Events


UNITED KINGDOM

BATH
Bruegel: Defining a Dynasty

In the UK's first exhibition devoted to the Bruegel family, 35 works have been brought together to showcase the originality and diversity of four generations of these talented artists. As well as loans from the National Gallery, Royal Collection Trust, the National Trust, the Fitzwilliam Museum, the Ashmolean Museum and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, paintings from the Holburne's own collection will be on show, including one of the highlights, Wedding Dance in the Open Air. Previously thought to be the work of a copyist, recent conservation work and analysis has now firmly attributed this oil painting to Pieter Bruegel the Younger.
The Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388569
(www.holburne.org)
Until 4 June 2017.

BRADFORD
Splendours of the Subcontinent: A Prince's Tour of India 1875–6

As part of the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, an exhibition of the gifts presented to Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (the future Edward VII) on his 1875–76 visit to India, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Pakistan will tour the UK. This is the first time these exquisite examples of Indian craftsmanship have been on show together since 1876–83 when they toured the UK and Europe. Included are precious gold objects, such as the enamelled gold inkstand (above) presented by the Maharaja of Benares, jewellery, silverware and ceremonial arms; watercolours and photographs also help to tell the story. Splendours of the Subcontinent will travel from Bradford to New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, Leicester (July) and to the Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse (December), before returning to the Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace in 2018.
Cartwright Hall
+44 (0)1274 431212
(bradfordmuseums.org)
Until 18 June 2017.

CAMBRIDGE
Another India: Explorations and Expressions of Indigenous South Asia

Marking the 70th anniversary of India's independence from Britain and the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, this exhibition presents more than 100 artefacts, paintings and photographs from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology collections (some on show for the first time) along with work by contemporary artists in an exploration of the diverse minority populations of India. Together, the pieces on display tell the story of colonialism, British involvement in the subcontinent, and collecting.
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
+44 (0)1223 333516
(maa.cam.ac.uk)
Until 22 April 2018.


CAMBRIDGE
Madonnas and Miracles: The Holy Home in Renaissance Italy
Exploring the practice of religious devotion in the privacy of the Italian Renaissance home, this exhibition brings together books, jewellery, ceramics, sculpture and paintings from across the country, and juxtaposes fine works of art, such as Virgin and Child (above) by Botticelli (1444–1510), alongside more homely artefacts. The exhbitis bear witness to the relationship between spirituality, domesticity and materiality during a period that is often seen in a more secular light.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 7 March to 4 June 2017.

CIRENCESTER, Gloucestershire
Fresh Air 2017

In its 13th biennial sculpture exhibition, a variety of vibrant contemporary works will be on show in the picturesque setting of Quenington Old Rectory's five-acre garden, beside the River Coln. Fresh Air 2017 features a mixture of media, styles and scales, with 75 artists (30 new to the show) taking part, many of them focusing on the theme of flora and fauna. Garden furniture, glass-works and ceramics, such as Peter Hayes' Raku disc with a blue wave (above) will all be there.
Quenington Old Rectory
+44 (0)1285 750 358
(www.freshairsculpture.com)
From 11 June to 2 July 2017.

DULWICH
Vanessa Bell (1879-1961)

The first major exhibition of the work of Vanessa Bell, a key figure of the Bloomsbury Group, takes a close look at her pioneering work in portraiture, still life and landscape, and in decorative arts. With some 100 oil paintings on show, along with fabrics and works on paper, Bell's experiments with abstraction, colour and form will be explored. Among the key works on display are her portraits, including one of her sister Virginia Woolf (above), and her decorative designs for furniture.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0) 20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk/)
From 8 February to 4 June 2017.

EDINBURGH
Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites

Love, loss, exile, rebellion and retribution all play a part in this exhibition that tells the real story of a turbulent period in European history, the rise and fall of the Jacobites and Charles Edward Stuart (better known as Bonnie Prince Charlie), which still carries with it a number of misconceptions. He landed on the Isle of Eriskay in
1745, and was the Jacobite Stuarts' last hope of regaining the crown of England, Scotland and Ireland, after his grandfather James VII (of Scotland) and II (of England) was deposed and replaced by James' Protestant daughter Mary and her husband William of Orange. But Charles was ultimately defeated in the Battle of Culloden. Many historic artefacts from Scottish collections and from across the UK and France, including spectacular objects given to Bonnie Prince Charlie, like this dress targe, a circular shield (above) presented to him by James, 3rd Duke of Perth, circa 1740, shed light on the Jacobites and their campaigns.
National Museum of Scotland
+44 (0)300 123 6789
(www.nms.ac.uk)
From 23 June to 12 November 2017.


EDINBURGH
Maria Merian's Butterflies
The German artist and entomologist, Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717), travelled to Suriname in 1699 and spent two years in, what was then, a Dutch colony studying and recording plants and animals, and the little-understood life-cycle of insects. Fine plates of her ground-breaking Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium (Metamorphosis of the Insects of Suriname), part-printed and part-painted on vellum by Maria Merian's own hand and acquired by George III for his scientific library at Buckingham House, tell the extraordinary story of this intrepid artist and her scientific endeavours. One example (above) of her beautiful illustrations is Branch of West Indian Cherry with Achilles Morpho Butterfly, 1702–3.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
Until 23 July 2017.


EDINBURGH
The Tomb: Ancient Egyptian Burial

This fascinating exhibition tells the story of 1000 years of use and reuse of one ancient Egyptian tomb in Thebes. Built circa 1290 BC for the chief of police and his wife, it was looted and reused a number of times over the centuries until the early 1st century AD when, shortly after the Roman conquest of Egypt, it was sealed when an entire family was interred in it. The tomb then remained intact until it was excavated in the 19th century, preserving an array of stunning finds from various eras in ancient Egypt, all reflecting the wish to remember the deceased, to protect their bodies and to provide for their spirits in the Underworld. Among the highlights on show are a cedarwood, ebony and ivory box made for Amenhotep II (see the news item on page 4), amulets, a gilded mummy mask and the painted sacrophagus of the priest Nehemsumut (above) from Thebes, circa 840–815 BC.
National Museum of Scotland
+44 (0)300 123 6789
(www.nms.ac.uk)
From 31 March to 3 September 2017.


LIVERPOOL
Tracey Emin and William Blake in Focus

In a curious pairing, Tracey Emin's infamous work My Bed is displayed in the north of England for the first time in an exhibition, which explores the links between her and poet and artist William Blake. Born some 200 years apart, both artists' work shows a preoccupation with spirituality, birth and death. Among pieces on show by Blake are his colour print, Pity, circa 1795 (above) The Blasphemer and The Crucifixion: 'Behold Thy Mother'.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)151 702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 3 September 2017.


LIVERPOOL
Portraying a Nation: Germany 1919–1933

The works of two artists, painter Otto Dix and photographer August Sander, are being exhibited for the first time, side by side, charting the Weimar Republic and Germany during the interwar years. More than 300 paintings, drawings, prints and photographs are displayed in two exhibitions, Otto Dix: The Evil Eye and ARTIST ROOMS: August Sander. Their work reflects the experimentation and innovation in visual arts during this pivotal period in Germany's history and also both artists' preoccupation with representing the extremes of society. Otto Dix's harsh portrayals of German society – including his Reclining Woman on a Leopard Skin, 1927 (above) – and the brutality of war, mainly produced in Düsseldorf between 1922 and 1925, when he became a leading New Objectivity painter, are complemented by August Sander's expansive series People of the Twentieth Century. Together they offer a collective portrait of a nation.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)151 702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 23 June to 15 October 2017.

LONDON
Hokusai: beyond the Great Wave

Perhaps the most famous image in Japanese art is the iconic print The Great Wave, circa 1831, by Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849). The first UK exhibition to focus on the productive last 30 years of the artist's life, explores his later works both chronologically and thematically. Paintings, drawings, woodblock prints and illustrated books, from the British Museum's own collection, and loans from Japan, Europe, and the United States (many on show in the UK for the first time), reveal aspects of Hokusai's personal beliefs and interests. Among the highlights are prints from the famous series Thirty-Six Views of Mt Fuji, such as Clear day with a southern breeze ('Red Fuji'), 1831 (above), which revived his career in the early 1830s after difficulties in the previous few years. The light sensitivity of some pieces means they can only be shown for a limited period. So for conservation reasons, there will be a rotation of about half of the 110 works on display midway through the exhibition.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
From 25 May to 13 August 2017. (Closed from 3-6 July for a partial rotation of the exhibits.)

LONDON
Sargent: The Watercolours

In this exhibition some 80 works by John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) reflect the artist's technical talents and individuality during his fertile period of watercolour production between 1900 and 1918. Drawn to the flexibility of the medium, which allowed him to paint rapidly and with little preparation, Sargent used watercolour to escape the studio and work en plein air. He travelled through southern Europe and the Middle East, recording landscapes, architecture and people that he saw there. While his watercolours, such as The Church of Santa Maria della Salute, Venice, circa 1904–9 (above), and Rome: An Architectural Study, circa 1906–7, are often viewed and then overlooked as mere travel souvenirs, they actually form an important part of Sargent's oeuvre as they reveal his distinctive way of seeing and composing, using close-ups, unorthodox and obscured viewpoints and dynamic poses.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
From 21 June to 8 October 2017.

LONDON
Tunnel: The Archaeology of Crossrail

Artefacts unearthed at sites across London during the Crossrail project tell the story of 8000 years of human activity in the capital, covering many key historic events. The finds range from a Mesolithic flint scatter to a chamber-pot showing the Victorian sense of humour. Among other highlights are skeletons from the 1660s found buried in a mass grave near Liverpool Street, which tested positive for the Plague pathogen, and a rare Roman copper alloy medallion of Emperor Philip I (above), issued to mark the New Year celebrations in AD 245, only the second known example from Europe.
Museum of London Docklands
+44 (0)20 7001 9844
(www.museumoflondon.org.uk)
Until 3 September 2017.

LONDON
Canaletto and the Art of Venice

Joseph Smith (circa 1674−1770), an English merchant and later British Consul in Venice, was the greatest patron of art in the city at the time. In 1762, George III purchased almost all of Smith's paintings, which made the Royal Collection pre-eminent in 18th-century Venetian art in the world. It includes the largest number of works by Canaletto. More than 200 paintings, drawings and prints by this famous Venetian painter and his contemporaries demonstrate how they captured the allure of the city. Not only did Canaletto and others meticulously record the vibrancy of the city, they also developed the capriccio fantasies, as in Marco Riccis' Caprice View with Roman Ruins, circa 1729 (above).
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)20 7766 7300
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 19 May to 12 November 2017.

LONDON
Queer British Art 1861–1967

Marking the 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalisation of male homosexuality in England and Wales, this is the first exhibition devoted to queer British art. It explores lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) identities in the arts – from the abolition of the death penalty for sodomy in 1861 to the passing of the Sexual Offences Act in 1967. With a variety of works covering the public and the personal, the playful and the political, it looks at the role of queer art in society, coded desires, women who defied convention, and Sixties Soho. Works by Francis Bacon, Cecil Beaton, Duncan Grant, Evelyn de Morgan, and more are shown alongside films, magazines, personal photographs, ephemera, and objects such as the door from Oscar Wilde's prison cell.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
Until 1 October 2017.


LONDON
Alberto Giacometti

Best known for his elongated bronze figures, Alberto Giacometti (1901–66) was also a skilled painter and draughtsman and he sculpted in other materials. More than 250 works, including significant loans from Paris' Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti, chart his career and demonstrate how he has earned his place among the great 20th-century painter-sculptors, such as Matisse, Picasso and Degas. This exhibition examines the Swiss artist's work with Surrealism and the themes of brutality and sadism, his interest in Egyptian and African art, his fusing of ancient and modern styles, his relationship with the decorative arts, and his interest in scale and perspective. As well as his iconic bronze figures, which in their isolation personify the despair that was rife in post-war Paris, rarely seen fragile plaster works will be on show. One example is the group Women of Venice, 1956 (seen in a photograph with the artist, above), created for the Venice Biennale and now brought together for the first time since then.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
From 10 May to
10 September 2017.

LONDON
Gilded Interiors: French Masterpieces of Gilt Bronze

In late 18th-century France, gilt bronze was used to create luxurious but useful objects, such as clocks, candelabras and firedogs, and also to embellish furniture and porcelain. But these works, many of which were designed by the foremost architects and modelled by leading sculptors, are often overlooked as an art form. The last word in luxury, gilt bronze works were commissioned and owned by the wealthiest in French society, including Marie-Antoinette, and international patrons, such as the Prince of Wales (later George IV). Alongside the glittering objects on show are highly-detailed drawings by architect and interior designer Pierre-Adrien Pâris (1745-1819) – on view for the first time in the UK – which illustrate how the Classical ruins of ancient Rome provided inspiration both for architects and decorative artists.
Wallace Collection
+44 (0)207 563 9500
(www.wallacecollection.org)
From 4 May to 30 July 2017.

LONDON
The American Dream: Pop to the Present

With more than 200 works by 70 artists, this major exhibition charts six decades of American printmaking from the birth of Pop Art in the early 1960s, through Minimalism, Conceptual art and photorealism, to the present. Bold, innovative prints from the latter half of the 20th century responded to contemporary events and burning issues, such as President Kennedy's assassination in 1963, the Vietnam War, the struggle for civil rights, the AIDS crisis, feminism and the power and influence of the USA. Loans from New York's Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC and other institutions, as well as work from the British Museum's own collections, by an array of America's most celebrated artists including Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Bourgeois, and Ed Ruscha whose screenprint, Standard Station, (above) will be on display.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(www.americandreamexhibition.org)
From 9 March to 18 June 2017.

LONDON
Places of the Mind: British Watercolour Landscapes 1850–1950

The perception that the 'Great Age of British Watercolours' ended when Turner died in 1851 is being challenged in this display of 125 landscapes. Ranging from Pre-Raphaelite works by George Price Boyce and Alfred William Hunt to more abstract pieces by Henry Moore, the selection shows a variety of techniques, styles, and responses to the cultural and social shifts of the time. The landscapes bear witness to the effects of tourism, urbanisation, artists' colonies and the aftermath of war. Highlights include John Singer Sargent's View from a Window, Genoa, circa 1911 (above).
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
From 23 February to 27 August 2017.

LONDON
Cagnacci's Repentant Magdalene: An Italian Baroque Masterpiece from the Norton Simon Museum

The erotically charged, monumental (229.2cm x 266.1cm) Repentant Magdalene (above), painted circa 1660–61, is often considered Guido Cagnacci's greatest work. Now on loan from the Norton Simon Museum in California, this painting offers a rare chance to see a work by one of the most unconventional and sensual artists of the Italian Baroque, whose paintings do not appear in any UK public collections.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 21 May 2017.


LONDON
Michelangelo & Sebastiano

Charting the artistic relationship between Michelangelo and Sebastiano del Piombo, from the 1510s to the 1540s, this exhibition brings together a range of works by both artists, singly, their collaborations, and even their intimate correspondence. The themes covered include their work before meeting, their parting of ways, how each artist treated the death and resurrection of Christ, approaches towards figure and characterisation, and their influence on one another. Del Piombo's sympathetic Mary and Elizabeth (The Visitation) circa 1518–19 (above) is one of the works that are on display.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 15 March to
25 June 2017.

LONDON
America after the Fall: Painting in the 1930s

A complement to the British Museum's American Dream exhibition, this focuses on the Great Depression, which left America facing major challenges in the years following the Wall Street Crash. Mass urbanisation, industrialisation and immigration are all reflected in American art of the 1930s. Among the 45 works are paintings by Jackson Pollock, Georgia O'Keefe, Edward Hopper and Grant Wood, whose iconic American Gothic is on display outside North America for the first time.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 4 June 2017.

LONDON
Wolfgang Tillmans

Photographs, video, digital slide projections and recorded music all make up contemporary artist Wolfgang Tillmans' first exhibition at the Tate Modern. The works, which include astro custo, 2012, (above), look at the state of the world today, using 2003, the year of the invasion of Iraq and anti-war demonstrations, as a key turning-point. Portraiture, landscape and still life all feature and explore social and political issues.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
Until 11 June 2017.



LONDON
America after the Fall: Painting in the 1930s

A critical period of the 20th century for America was the Great Depression, which followed the Wall Street Crash. Changes such as mass urbanisation, industrialisation and immigration are all reflected in American art of the 1930s. Among the 45 paintings in this exhibition are works by Jackson Pollock, Georgia O'Keefe, Edward Hopper and Grant Wood, whose iconic American Gothic, 1930 (above), travels outside North America for the first time.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 25 February to 4 June 2017.


LONDON
The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection

One of the world's greatest private collections of photography forms the basis of the exhibition, which showcases over 150 examples of classic modernist work from the 1920s to the 1950s. Over 60 artists are represented, including André Kertész, Berenice Abbot, Alexander Rodchenko and Edward Steichen, plus Man Ray's portraits of Matisse, Picasso and Breton and his Les Larmes (Glass Tears) 1932 (above).
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
Until 7 May 2017.

LONDON
Electricity: The Spark of Life

How have people tried to understand and master the power of electricity throughout history? This exhibition centres on the generation, supply and consumption of this powerful but deadly force that we all depend on today, exploring these themes through photography, paintings and a variety of objects, including electrostatic generators and ancient amber used to make sparks.
Wellcome Collection
+44 (0)20 7611 2222
(www.wellcomecollection.org)
From 23 February to 25 June 2017.

LONDON
Opening up the Soane

The seven-year Opening up the Soane programme has now been completed, and Sir John Soane's Museum has been returned to the architect's original design for his Georgian house-museum, allowing it to be seen as he intended. A number of lost spaces have been re-created and opened to visitors for the first time, and the museum now has full step-free access. Among the restored areas are the kitchens, the ante-room and the catacombs in the basement, the lobby to the breakfast room (above), and the Apollo recess. The museum's candlelit evenings will continue to take place on the first Tuesday of each month.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+44 (0)20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
Ongoing.

LONDON
Defacing the past: Damnation and Desecration in Imperial Rome

A look at the fascinating Roman act of damnatio memoriae, where a mention of a particular person – be it their name or image – is struck from the record. For instance, an overthrown emperor's memory could be condemned or erased in this way by his successors. Though the focus is primarily on coinage (above), inscriptions, papyri and sculpture will also be on show.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
From 13 October 2016
to 7 May 2017.

LONDON
Bridget Riley: Paintings, 1963-2015

This exhibition charts Bridget Riley's dramatic use of monochrome and colour throughout her career, from her exclusively black and white paintings in the early to mid-1960s, to her transition to grey in the late 1960s and, then, on to colour. More recently she has returned to monochrome but, although Riley has taken up a palette from the past, her latest monochromatic works show new ideas developed from her paintings in colour.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 16 September 2017.

 

OXFORD
Raphael: The Drawings

Spanning the career of Raphael (1483–1520), from his early years in Umbria to his triumphs in Florence and Rome, this exhibition brings together over 100 works from international collections, in an attempt to transform how we look at his work by focusing on the immediacy and expressiveness of his drawings. Studies for major projects, such as the Vatican frescoes, and for Transfiguration, his final painting, which he worked on up until to his death, with drawings such as Detail of Study of Two Apostles for the 'Transfiguration' (above) reveal his astounding visual language.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
From 1 June to 3 September 2017.

OXFORD
Degas to Picasso: Creating Modernism in France

The story of the rise of Modernism in France is told through the works of some of the greatest artists in the country, including Manet, Pisarro, Cézanne, Picasso and Degas, from around 1800 to the mid-20th century. Starting with the Romantic artists David, Gericault and Delacroix, this show looks at the departure from tradition and follows the winding route to abstraction and Paris where ideas were exchanged in bohemian spheres. An interesting watercolour by Degas, St John the Baptist and the Angel, 1857–8, (above) is one of the works on show.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
Until 7 May 2017.

UNITED STATES


CHICAGO, Illinois
Chinamania

Sculptor Walter McConnell's new installation, A Theory of Everything: Dark Stupa consists of more than 50 pieces of blue-and-white Chinese porcelain from the Kangxi period (1661-1722), and a hanging piece he has made from 3D scans of them. Also on show are two vast sculptutures, which McConnell terms stupas (one is shown above). Each made of more than 800 of his own porcelain figures, they present a striking contrast between the historic originals and their mass-produced imitations.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
Until 4 June 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Mummies

The most iconic symbol of ancient Egypt is the mummy. This exhibition reveals the secrets of mummification using modern scientific techniques, rare artefacts and cutting-edge imagery. Egyptian mummies are displayed alongside others from Peru, where numerous different cultures practised mummification thousands of years ago.
American Museum of Natural History
+1 212 769 5100
(www.amnh.org)
Until 7 January 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Age of Empires: Chinese Art of
the Qin and Han Dynasties (221 BC–AD 220)

The fleeting Qin dynasty (221–206 BC) and much longer Han dynasty (206 BC–AD 220) unified China, bringing about political stability, prosperity and a golden age in art, literature and technology. More than 160 works, including terracotta warriors, ceramics, metalwork, textiles, calligraphy, painting and architectural models, on loan from collections in China examine how art helped create a new and lasting cultural identity. Featuring new research and archaeological discoveries from the past 50 years, the exhibition also reveals ancient China's relationship with other parts of the world.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 16 July 2017.


NEW YORK, New York
Paradise of Exiles: Early Photography in Italy

Daguerreotypes and photographs from Italy, dating from between 1839 (the year photography was invented) and 1871 (the year Italy became a unified nation), are brought together in this exhibition to give a picture of the country as an important centre of exchange and experimentation in the development of this new medium, with foreign travellers capturing its distinctive monuments and landscapes. One example is Temple of Vesta, circa 1855 (above), a salted paper print by Pietro Dovizielli (1804–85). This show celebrates the little-known contribution of Italian photographers to the early decades of the new art form, and also reflects how they used daguerreotypes and paper negatives to represent their cultural heritage at a time of great political change.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 13 August 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Noah's Beasts: Sculpted Animals from Ancient Mesopotamia

Images of animals in Mesopotamian sculptures crafted in stone, such as Ewe and Ram Flanking Plant with a Gatepost, Late Uruk period, circa 3500–3100 BC (above), and also in metal, such as silver with inlays of shell and lapis lazuli, reflect the role of animals in religion and ancient agrarian societies, and illustrate the connection between humankind and the rest of the natural world. On show will be: sculptural works from circa 3300–2250 BC, which reveal the attention to naturalistic detail combined with elements of stylisation; cylinder seals, including one depicting animals behaving like humans, and clay tablets, including one from 1646 BC inscribed with The Deluge Story (perhap a prototype for the biblical story of Noah's Flood).
The Morgan Library and Museum
+1 212 685 0008
(www.themorgan.org)
From 26 May to 27 August 2017.


NEW YORK, New York
Splendors of Korean Art

Loans from the National Museum of Korea, including Silla gold jewellery and pottery, Goryeo Buddhist sculpture, celadon ware and Joseon porcelain and paintings, join pieces from the Met's own collections to present a chronological tour of Korea's art history from the Late Bronze Age to the 21st century. In more than 70 works displayed, the highlights include the Goryeo Buddhist 14th-century gilded Amitabha Triad (above) from the National Museum of Korea, which is shown near the Met's 7th-century Pensive Bodhisattva and 17th-century Seated Bodhisattva, reflecting the long-continued tradition of Buddhist art. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 17 September 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Infinite Blue

The colour blue has been used to represent spirituality, power, status and beauty in a range of cultures throughout history. Following one common strand, the blue artworks on display from across the globe reveal information about cultural values, technological advances, and international trade. As part of  A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum (a series of exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A Sackler Center for Feminist Art), Infinite Blue features paintings, prints, drawings, decorative arts, printed books and more. Among the highlights are illuminated manuscripts exemplifying the use of blue in Christian iconography, early Chinese blue-and-white porcelain, and a stunning blue faience, late 2nd-century statuette of Aphrodite (above) from Ptolemaic Egypt.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 5 November 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
A Woman's Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt

Also part of the Brooklyn Museum's series A Year of Yes, this exhibition delves into the ancient Egyptian belief that to make rebirth possible for a deceased woman, she must briefly turn into a man long enough to create a foetus. This is because, according to Egyptian medicine, the man creates the foetus and passes it on to the woman during sex. Evidence for this post-mortem gender transformation can be seen in coffins on which a woman is depicted with red skin (more commonly a male attribute) and on which spells that address the deceased with masculine pronouns are recorded. As well as painted sarcophagi, like the Coffin of the Lady of the House, circa 1292-1190 BC (above), small statuettes are on display, showing the woman returned to her female state after recreating herself for rebirth.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until end 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Renaissance Maiolica: Painted Pottery for Shelf and Table

Maufactured in Italy from the 15th to the 17th centuries, this beautifully painted and tin-glazed earthenware took the form of many practical objects, such as tableware, serving vessels, storage containers and desk accessories, as well as devotional objects and sculpture. Maiolica works were created with harmony between form and function, and were immensely valued for artistic reasons by Italy's elite. Renaissance Italian potters drew on techniques that were used in the Islamic world, which they combined with innovations in contemporary goldsmithing, sculpture and painting to create exquisitely decorated pieces of maiolica. These in turn influenced tin-glazed pottery elsewhere in Europe.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 29 May 2017.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.

PRINCETON, New Jersey
The Berlin Painter and His World: Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early 5th Century BC

Since 1911 when Sir John Beazley first published his identification of the otherwise anonymous Berlin Painter, the total number of complete and fragmentary vases attributed to this talented Attic artist has expanded to some 330 pieces. Celebrated for his elegant style, the painter influenced other vase painters of the period whose works will also be shown in this exhibition. There are 54 vase-paintings by the Berlin Painter, and a further 30 by other artists including his teacher Phintias, his principal rival the Kleophrades Painter, his students Hermonax, the Providence Painter, and the Achilles Painter, and followers such as the Dutuit Painter and the Tithonos Painter. The range both of subjects depicted and sizes of vessels show the wider context of 5th-century Athens. Among the highlights by the Berlin Painter are his name-vase from Berlin, a red-figure amphora with a fawn between Hermes and a satyr, and a hydria depicting Apollo seated on top of a winged tripod from the Vatican (above).
Princeton University Art Museum
+1 609 258 3788
(artmuseum.princeton.edu)
From 4 March to 11 June 2017.

WASHINGTON DC
Inventing Utamaro: A Japanese Masterpiece Rediscovered

For the first time since 1879, all three original parts of a triptych painting by the celebrated ukiyo-e artist Kitagawa Utamaro (1753–1806) will be displayed together. The large-scale painting group explores the classical Japanese themes, moon and flowers, with stylised figures of beautiful women, as was characteristic of Utamaro (who became known as a connoisseur of female beauty) and other ukiyo-e painters. The three original pieces, Moon at Shinagawa (above ) from the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art, Fukagawa in the Snow, from the Okada Museum of Art in Hakone, Japan, and Cherry Blossoms at Yoshiwara, from the collection of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, Connecticut, have been reunited only at the Sackler Gallery due to loan restrictions. Other items on view, such as prints and illustrated books, demonstrate how ukiyo-e artists working within studios would re-use compositions and themes, and place Utamaro's triptych in the context of Japonisme and collecting and connoisseurship at the turn of the 20th century.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
From 8 April to 9 July 2017.

WASHINGTON DC
Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence

The glazing technique invented by the 15th-century Florentine sculptor Luca della Robbia (1399/1400–82) characterises the terracotta sculptures produced by three generations of the Della Robbia family, still spectacular today with their vivid colours – brilliant blues, whites, greens, purples and yellows. Innovative and expressive Della Robbia works on display include reliefs of Prudence, 1475 (above) portraits, household statuettes and architectural decoration, along with sculptures by a rival firm, the workshop of Benedetto Buglioni (1459/1460–1521) and his apprentice Santi Buglioni (1494–1576).
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
Until 4 June 2017.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
War and Storm: Treasures from the sea around Sicily

Warships destroyed in sea battles and merchant vessels wrecked off the coast of Sicily over three millennia have yielded extraordinary objects that form the basis of this exhibition. Highlighting the importance of the island as a key spot for trade and cultural exchanges as well as the dangers of travelling by sea, Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Arab and Norman artefacts are all on show. Helmets and beak-heads speak of naval battles fought long ago, while amphorae, since taken over by coral (below), reflect the trade networks along with grander items, such as a life-size elephant's foot cast in bronze, which was probably part of a complete bronze elephant, the rest of which remains lost beneath the waves.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
From 6 April to 20 August 2017.

FRANCE


LENS
The Le Nain Mystery

The three Le Nain brothers, Antoine, Louis and Mathieun, made an important contribution to 17th-century French painting, yet some of their works are still shrouded in mystery, with questions over attribution gripping art historians. They produced country scenes populated by peasants, large-format religious works, sensuous mythological paintings, such as Louis Le Nain's Venus at the Forge of Vulcan, 1641 (above) and small copperplate etchings. As well as featuring works from across the Le Nains' careers, grouped together according to style to identify each brother's artistic personality, the exhibition also examines their legacy.
Musée du Louvre-Lens
+33 32 11 86 321
(www.louvrelens.fr)
Until 26 June 2017.

PARIS
France-Germany, 1870–1871: War, Commune, and Memories

In the Franco-Prussian War, Paris was besieged and the Communards took over the city. This exhibition takes a fresh look at the conflict, presenting both the French and German points of view and setting the war in a larger chronological context. Objects, such as this Aigle du 21e de ligne (Eagle of the 21st Line) (left), paintings, sculptures, photographs and documents reveal the impact of the war and the political, military and ideological developments that took place
as a result.
Musée de l'Armée
+33 810 11 33 99
(www.musee-armee.fr)
Until 30 July 2017.

PARIS
Picasso Primitive

Despite often denying that his work had nay relationship with non-European art, Picasso's personal art collection reveals that he was fascinated by it, and had pieces from Africa, Oceania, the Americas and Asia in his studios. Divided into two sections, Picasso Primitive first looks, chronologically, at the documents, letters, objects and photographs that tell the story of the artist's admiration, respect and, even, fear of non-Western art. The second part compares Picasso's works to those by non-European artists, focusing on themes such as nudity, sexuality, impulses and loss, rather than simply on stylistic links.
Musée du quai Branly
+33 1 56 61 70 00
(www.quaibranly.fr)
Until 23 July 2017.

PARIS
The Power of Flowers: Pierre-Joseph Redouté

Often dubbed 'the Raphael of Flowers', Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759–1840), combined science and art in his accurate botanical paintings. He recorded new plants, collected from all over the globe, that appeared in gardens, reproducing them meticulously and elegantly in watercolour on vellum. Appointed painter to Empress Joséphine and Queen Marie-Amélie, he was also an engraver, a publisher and a teacher. In this, the first exhibition in France completely dedicated to Redouté and his influence, more than 250 works on loan from various museums around the country will be on show.
Musée de la Vie Romantique
+33 1 55 31 95 67
(museevieromantique.paris.fr)
Until 1 October 2017.


PARIS
Masterpieces of the Leiden Collection: The Age of Rembrandt

In a season celebrating the Dutch Golden Age, the Louvre is exhibiting a selection of 17th-century works from the private collection of Thomas Kaplan and Daphne Recanati Kaplan – the largest private collection of works by Rembrandt. Some 30 paintings and drawings reveal the talents of Golden Age painters from the Leiden region as well as Rembrandt, whose 10 works on show include the large-format Minerva in her Study (above). The exhibition also features works by Frans van Mieris, Gerrit Dou and Jan Steen.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 53 17
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 22 May 2017.

PARIS
Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting

Also part of the Louvre's exploration of the Dutch Golden Age is this exhibition on Johannes Vermeer, which for the first time since 1966 brings together 12 of his paintings (representing a third of his total known body of work), including loans from American, British, German and Dutch collections, with comparative pieces by other artists of the day. His work is seen in the context of the Golden Age and the development of a new wave of genre painting in the early 1650s that portrayed an idealised elegant domesticity, as can be seen in The Milkmaid, 1657–58 (above).
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 53 17
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 22 May 2017.

PARIS
The Body in Movement: Dance and the Museum

Spanning antiquity to the 20th century, this new Petite Galerie exhibition presents some 70 pieces that highlight diverse responses to the challenge of capturing movement in artworks that are, by nature, static. Together, they offer a chance to examine conventions of the representation of movement and postures, including walking, running, stopping in one's tracks, and even the movement of the soul, for example through fear. The history of artists' attempts to anatomise movement, long before the advent of chronophotography, is told through the work of artists such as Degas and Rodin, and famed dancers, such as Isadora Duncan and Vaslav Nijinsky. Highlights of the exhibition include Ancient Egyptian figures, such as this ofine example that dates from circa 1800 BC (above), and images on Ancient Greek red and black figure vases. The show includes loans from Musée Rodin, the Musée d'Orsay and the Centre Pompidou.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 53 17
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 3 July 2017.

GERMANY


BERLIN
Dangerous Perfection: Ancient Funerary Vases from Apulia

Some 13 impressive funerary vases from Ceglie del Campo in Apulia (recently conserved as part of a joint project with the J Paul Getty Museum in LA after enduring wartime and postwar damage) are on show. The vases, which shed light on ancient upper-class burial customs, are richly decorated with scenes from Greek mythology, such as the fight against the Chimera shown on the one (above). They were restored in the 19th century by Raffaele Garguilo (1785–1870); at the time his reconstructions were described as a 'dangerous perfection'.
Altes Museum
+49 30 266 42 42 42
(www.smb.museum)
Until 18 June 2017.



ISRAEL
JERUSALEM
Gods, Heroes and Mortals in Ancient Greece

Greek vases had a variety of functions and the finest examples were richly decorated with scenes from the mythological world or with figures from the realm of men, such as athletes and warriors as in the Attic red-figure lekythos made circa 470–450 BC (above). This exhibition explores depictions of gods and mortals on pots ranging from the second millennium BC to the end of the 5th century BC. It also offers an insight into the manufacture and usage of the pots.
Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem
+972 2 561 1066
(www.blmj.org)
Until June 2018.

MONACO


Borderline
A dozen vast works by Philippe Pasque, seven on display for the first time, explore the notion of limits and challenge society's relationship with nature, particularly the fear of and fascination with the marine world, and commitments to protecting biodiversity in the oceans. Pasque's giant silver shark in a piece called Who should be scared? 2016 (above), is one of the pieces on show.
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco
+377 93 15 36 00
(www.oceano.org)
From 5 May to 30 September 2017.

NETHERLANDS
AMSTERDAM
Turkish Tulips
Tulips are forever associated with the Netherlands but in this exhibition, curated by British artist Gavin Turk, the trade routes that brought them here from Turkey are traced. Contemporary works featuring tulips by Sir Peter Blake, Damien Hirst and Philippa van Loon are also on show in the home of the Van Loon family, who traded with the Ottoman Empire in the 16th century.
Museum Van Loon
+31 20 624 5255
www.museumvanloon.nl
Until 29 May 2017.


THE HAGUE
The Discovery of Mondrian

As part of the year-long celebration, Mondrian to Dutch design: 100 years of De Stijl, the Gemeentemuseum is, for the first time, exhibiting its entire Mondrian collection – the biggest in the world. More than 300 works covering every stage of his career – from his landscapes, painted in and around Amsterd,am and Domburg, to his iconic grid paintings, such as Composition with red, black, yellow, blue and gray, 1921 (above) – will be on show. There will also be letters, photographs and personal belongings (such as the artist's collection of gramophone records), including objects that are normally considered too fragile to display. To complete the scene, there will also be reconstructions of Mondrian's Amsterdam, Paris and New York studios.
Gemeentemuseum
+31 (0)70 3381111
(www.gemeentemuseum.nl)
3 June to 24 September 2017.

QATAR

DOHA
Picasso-Giacometti

A collaboration between Qatar Museums, the Musée National Picasso and the Fondation Giacometti, this is the first exhibition showing the work of Pablo Picasso and Alberto Giacometti in the Middle East. More than 80 works, including paintings –such as Self-Portrait by Giacometti, circa 1923 (above) – sculpture and drawings, by the two artists have been brought together to explore the relationship between them and their work. The pieces displayed chart their development as young artists, the influence of Surrealism and their post-war return to Realism.
The Fire Station Artist in Residence
+974 4452 5555
(firestation.org.qa)
Until 21 May 2017.

DOHA
Imperial Threads: motifs and artisans from Turkey, Iran and India

Exploring artistic and cultural exchanges in Turkey, Iran and India in the early modern era, this exhibition centres on carpets made in Timurid and Safavid Iran, Ottoman Turkey and Mughal India. The Timurids helped shape aspects of the Safavid, Ottoman, and Mughal empires, and introduced new artistic styles and practices, mixing semi-nomadic traditions with existing elements of Persian culture. Manuscripts, metalwork and ceramics all help to set the carpets in their wider historic and artistic contexts.
Museum of Islamic Art
+974 4422 4444
(mia.org.qa)
Until 4 November 2017.


SPAIN

MADRID
Masterworks from Budapest: From the Renaissance to the Avant-Garde

While the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest is closed for renovation, some star pieces from its collection are on show in Madrid along with additional loans from the National Gallery of Hungary. A selection of 90 artworks representative of the two Budapest collections as a whole has travelled to Spain,. These span the 15th to the 19th centuries and are by some of the finest of Italian, German, Flemish, Spanish and Hungarian artists. Highlights include works by Leonardo, Dürer, Velázquez and Rubens, such as his painting Mucius Scaevola before Lars Porsenna, 1618–20 (above).
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 28 May 2017.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
CAMBRIDGE
Ancient and Classical Worlds Summer Programme

Learn about the ancient civilisations on courses taught by leading experts on this summer programme at Cambridge's Institute of Continuing Education. The courses cover topics such as: the rise of civilisation in Mesopotamia and Mexico; the writing of the Old Testament; ancient Egyptian religion; Plato and Aristotle; Augustan poetry; and ancient astronomy. A series of lectures on the theme of Connections and Conflicts in art and ideas across ancient cultures complements the wide range of courses.
Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge
9–22 July
www.ice.cam.ac.uk

LONDON
Classical Archaeology Seminar 2016–17: Global Antiquities and Classical Archaeology

Globalising the Mediterranean's Iron Age
Tamar Hodos
10 May, 17.00
Room 349, Senate House, University of London

From terra sigillata to china: Globalisations, moving objects and cultural imaginations in North West Europe
Martin Pitts
31 May, 17.00
Court Room, Senate House, University of London

London Roman Art Seminar
(supported by the Institute of Classical Studies)

Wives of 'crisis'? Portraits of women and their husbands in the 3rd century AD
Helen Ackers
8 May

How Rome was rebuilt: approaches to architectural restoration in antiquity
Christopher Siwicki
22 May
All seminars are on Mondays at 17.30 Room 243, South Block of Senate House, University of London
www.icls.sas.ac.uk

Royal Numismatic Society Lectures: Deformed Skulls and Buffalo Crowns: The Coinage of the Iranian Huns and their Successors
Klaus Vondrovec
16 May, 18.00
The Warburg Institute
Coinage in Rome and the Roman provinces IV: The High Empire
Andrew Burnett
20 June, 18.00 (followed by
AGM and Summer Party)
Spink & Son
(numismatics.org.uk/society-meetings)

VARIOUS LOCATIONS
Helen

Actors of Dionysus are taking Helen, their contemporary interpretation of the myth of Helen of Troy, on a short tour. In this dramatice version, which has a strong physical element and aerial feats, the privileged life of an icon falls apart when her husband is killed in a coup.
Forum Theatre, Malvern
10 and 11 May, 19.45
Bridge House Theatre, Warwick
12 and 13 May, 19.30
Sweet St Andrews, Hove
16 May, 18.00; 17 and 18 May, 13.30 and 19.30; 19 May, 13.30 and 18.00
(www.actorsofdionysus.com)

UNITED STATES


NEW YORK
TEFAF New York Spring Fair

After another exciting art fair in Maastricht, TEFAF travels to New York for the inaugural TEFAF New York Spring Fair. Although it specialises in modern and contemporary art and design, it includes exceptional antiquities
from dealers worldwide. Among the exhibitors are Merrin Gallery, David Ghezelbash Archéologie, Phoenix Ancient Art and Charles Ede Ltd from London whose star items include a 7th-century BC Greek bronze griffin head protome, and a rare Faliscan impasto ware olla, bearing an abstract depiction of a horse (above), dating from 600 BC.
Park Avenue Armory
4–8 May
(www.tefaf.com)


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