Events


UNITED KINGDOM
BRISTOL
Skeletons: Our Buried Bones

This touring exhibition organised with the Museum of London and Wellcome Trust, brings together
12 skeletons from Bristol and London to demonstrate what analytical techniques can reveal about long-dead individuals. Among the remains on display are those of a young man given a simple burial in South Gloucestershire 3500 years ago, a Roman couple sharing a stone coffin, and a girl from a Victorian burial ground.
M Shed
+44 (0)117 352 6600
(www.bristolmuseums.org.uk)
Until 3 September 2017.

CAMBRIDGE
Another India: Explorations and Expressions of Indigenous South Asia

Marking the 70th anniversary of India's independence from Britain and the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, this exhibition presents more than 100 artefacts, paintings and photographs from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology collections (some on show for the first time) along with work by contemporary artists in an exploration of the diverse minority populations of India. Together, the pieces on display tell the story of colonialism, British involvement in the subcontinent, and collecting.
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
+44 (0)1223 333516
(maa.cam.ac.uk)
Until 22 April 2018.

CHATSWORTH, Derbyshire
House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth

Stunning pieces from the Devonshire Collection – including paintings, garments, jewellery, archival material, designs and textiles – are used to explore the history of dress. They offer an insight into the style of notable figures, such as Bess of Hardwick, Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, Adele Astaire, Deborah Devonshire and Nancy Mitford. The work of designers like Christian Dior, Gucci, Erdem and Alexander McQueen appear alongside livery, uniforms, coronation robes and fancy-dress costumes. Rare theatre costume designs from the 1660s, made by Inigo Jones, are also on show.
Chatsworth
+44 (0)1246 565300
(www.chatsworth.org)
Until 22 October 2017.

CAMBRIDGE
Elephants, Deities and Ashoka's Pillar: Coins of India from Antiquity to the Present

Celebrating 70 years of Indian independence, this exhibition uses coins and banknotes (from the Fitzwilliam's numismatic collections) to chart cultural, religious, economic, and political developments in India from the
4th century BC to the 20th century.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 1 October 2017.

EDINBURGH
Beyond Caravaggio

The dramatic masterpieces of Caravaggio (1571–1610) were greatly admired by artists in his lifetime and in the decades following his death. This collaboration between the National Gallery, London, the National Gallery of Ireland and the National Galleries of Scotland, brings together works not only by Caravaggio but also by his Europeans followers, such as Gentileschi, Ribera, Valentin and Ter Brugghen. Together they show the influence his use of light and composition had on other artists.
Scottish National Gallery
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 24 September 2017.

EDINBURGH
Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites

Love, loss, exile, rebellion and retribution all play a part in this exhibition that tells the real story of a turbulent period in European history, the rise and fall of the Jacobites and Charles Edward Stuart (better known as Bonnie Prince Charlie), which still carries with it a number of misconceptions. He landed on the Isle of Eriskay in
1745, and was the Jacobite Stuarts' last hope of regaining the crown of England, Scotland and Ireland, after his grandfather James VII (of Scotland) and II (of England) was deposed and replaced by James' Protestant daughter Mary and her husband William of Orange. But Charles was ultimately defeated in the Battle of Culloden. Many historic artefacts from Scottish collections and from across the UK and France, including spectacular objects given to Bonnie Prince Charlie, like this dress targe, a circular shield (above) presented to him by James, 3rd Duke of Perth, circa 1740, shed light on the Jacobites and their campaigns.
National Museum of Scotland
+44 (0)300 123 6789
(www.nms.ac.uk)
From 23 June to 12 November 2017.


EDINBURGH
The Tomb: Ancient Egyptian Burial

This fascinating exhibition tells the story of 1000 years of use and reuse of one ancient Egyptian tomb in Thebes. Built circa 1290 BC for the chief of police and his wife, it was looted and reused a number of times over the centuries until the early 1st century AD when, shortly after the Roman conquest of Egypt, it was sealed when an entire family was interred in it. The tomb then remained intact until it was excavated in the 19th century, preserving an array of stunning finds from various eras in ancient Egypt, all reflecting the wish to remember the deceased, to protect their bodies and to provide for their spirits in the Underworld. Among the highlights on show are a cedarwood, ebony and ivory box made for Amenhotep II (see the news item on page 4), amulets, a gilded mummy mask and the painted sacrophagus of the priest Nehemsumut (above) from Thebes, circa 840–815 BC.
National Museum of Scotland
+44 (0)300 123 6789
(www.nms.ac.uk)
From 31 March to 3 September 2017.

LIVERPOOL
Ancient Egypt: A Journey Through Time

One of the UK's leading collections of ancient Egyptian and Nubian antiquities is on display once more
in a new gallery at Liverpool's World Museum. The gallery has increased in size, with around 1000 artefacts on view, including many objects that have not been displayed before. Among the highlights are the Book
of the Dead of Djed-hor, who lived near the great temple of Horus at Edfu and who was buried circa
332 BC, and the painted coffin of a man named Haty (above) from 8th-century BC Thebes.
World Museum
+44 (0)151 478 4393
(www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk)
Ongoing.


LIVERPOOL
Tracey Emin and William Blake in Focus

In a curious pairing, Tracey Emin's infamous work My Bed is displayed in the north of England for the first time in an exhibition, which explores the links between her and poet and artist William Blake. Born some 200 years apart, both artists' work shows a preoccupation with spirituality, birth and death. Among pieces on show by Blake are his colour print, Pity, circa 1795 (above) The Blasphemer and The Crucifixion: 'Behold Thy Mother'.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)151 702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 3 September 2017.


LIVERPOOL
Portraying a Nation: Germany 1919–1933

The works of two artists, painter Otto Dix and photographer August Sander, are being exhibited for the first time, side by side, charting the Weimar Republic and Germany during the interwar years. More than 300 paintings, drawings, prints and photographs are displayed in two exhibitions, Otto Dix: The Evil Eye and ARTIST ROOMS: August Sander. Their work reflects the experimentation and innovation in visual arts during this pivotal period in Germany's history and also both artists' preoccupation with representing the extremes of society. Otto Dix's harsh portrayals of German society – including his Reclining Woman on a Leopard Skin, 1927 (above) – and the brutality of war, mainly produced in Düsseldorf between 1922 and 1925, when he became a leading New Objectivity painter, are complemented by August Sander's expansive series People of the Twentieth Century. Together they offer a collective portrait of a nation.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)151 702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 23 June to 15 October 2017.

LONDON
Desire, love, identity: exploring LGBTQ histories

Marking the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Sexual Offences Act that partially decriminalised homosexuality in England and Wales, a selection of objects ranging from 9000 BC to the present have been brought together to chart diverse experiences of love, sex and identity across cultures and across time. Among the exhibits are a silver medallion depicting the emperor Hadrian, minted in Rome in AD 119–22, and a coin showing his lover Antinous, from AD 130–38, (both above), images of Sappho and modern campaign badges. A marked trail explores this theme through key objects, such as the Warren Cup,
in the permanent collections.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
Until 15 October 2017.

LONDON
Bloomsbury Art & Design

In the early 20th century the Bloomsbury Group were busy producing beautiful paintings and applied arts. Artists, such as Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell, designed bold rugs, upholstery, ceramics and painted furniture. It was Roger Fry who opened the Omega Workshops in 1913, spurring the artists on to create such pieces for the home. He bequeathed many works to the newly formed Courtauld Institute of Art in 1935 and this helped form their significant Bloomsbury Group collection. A wide range of objects is on show, highlighting the lively creativity of their makers in contrast to the sombre Edwardian aesthetic prevailing at the time.
Courtauld Gallery
+44 (0)20 7848 2526
(courtauld.ac.uk)
Until 21 September 2017.

LONDON
Substance and Shadow: Alberto Giacometti Sculptures and their Photographs by Peter Lindbergh

Giacometti's highly distinctive, elongated sculptures have been captured in black and white photographs by Peter Lindbergh, and both are on show in this fine exhibition. The photographs capture Giacometti's bronzes and plasters from the Kunsthaus Zurich (the leading Giacometti collection held by a museum) and explore the relationship between the ancient medium of sculpture and the modern medium of photography.
Gagosian, Britannia Street
+44 (0)207 841 9960
(www.gagosian.com)
Until 22 July 2017.

LONDON
Syria: A Conflict Explored

When the Imperial War Museum was established in 1917, its purpose was to record the contemporary conflict, namely the First World War. Now, in its centenary year, the museum is embarking on Conflict Now – a series of events focusing on current developments. The first, Syria: A Conflict Explored, consists of exhibitions and events charting the ongoing upheaval in Syria. One display, Syria: Story of a Conflict, examines the origins and impact of the conflict; another, Sergey Ponomarev: A Lens on Syria, showcases images by this Pullitzer prize-winning Russian photographer. His images offer us an insight into life in government-controlled areas of Assad's Syria and the plight of Syrian refugees.
Imperial War Museum London
+44 (0)20 7416 5000
(www.iwm.org.uk)
Until 3 September 2017.

LONDON
Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic

Artist Chris Ofili has turned to tapestry for the first time with his commission from the Clothworkers' Company. Drawing inspiration from Classical mythology, contemporary figures, and the magic and stories of the Trinidadian landscape, the artist has created a colourful work in collaboration with the Dovecot Tapestry Studio. After its unveiling at the National Gallery (where it is on show alongside sketches and preparatory designs), the tapestry will move to its permanent home
at the Clothworkers' Hall.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 28 August 2017.


LONDON
Giovanni Da Rimini: An Early 14th-Century Masterpiece Reunited

A recent purchase by the National Gallery, acquired in 2015 with the assistance of US philanthropist Ronald S Lauder, the well-preserved panel Scenes from the Lives of the Virgin and other Saints,1300–05 (above) by Giovanni da Rimini (active 1292–1336) is on public display for the first time. The exhibition explores this exquisite, rare oil painting on a panel in the context of a brief artistic flourishing in the early 14th-century Rimini. The National Gallery's panel is thought to be half of a diptych and will be joined by what is believed to be the other half, Scenes from the Life of Christ, from the Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica, Rome.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 8 October 2017.


LONDON
The Encounter: Drawings from Leonardo to Rembrandt

A spectacular selection of fine portrait drawings by Old Masters from across Europe offers an insight into the intimate encounter between sitter and artist. Among the 50 works on show are drawings by Leonardo, Dürer, Rembrandt, Rubens and Hans Holbein the Younger, such as the latter's portrait of Sir John Godsalve, circa 1532-34 (above). Exhibiting exceptional draughtsmanship, a wide range of people are captured in the portraits. Some (such as Henry Parker, Lord Morley, Henry VIII's ambassador to Nuremberg) can be identified, others are unknown friends, pupils or people in the street. Also displayed are the tools and media used for these drawings, including metalpoint and coloured chalks.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0)20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
From 13 July to 22 October 2017.


LONDON
Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion

The influential Spanish designer Cristóbal Balenciaga (1895–1972) developed some famous shapes in fashion such as the tunic, the sack, the baby doll and the shift dress. After starting up in San Sebastian, he opened his famous fashion-house in Paris 80 years ago, but the 1950s and 1960s are considered his most creative years and are the focal point of this show. As well as garments and hats by Balenciaga and his followers, X-rays (examining how innovative structures were achieved), sketches, patterns and fabric samples are on view. There are also charming photographs, such as Dovima with Sacha, cloche and suit by Balenciaga, Café des Deux Magots, Paris, 1955, by Richard Avedon (above) to amuse. Mainly drawn from the V&A's own Balenciaga collection begun by Cecil Beaton in the 1970s, the clothes on show bear witness to a versatile designer who could create everything from ballgowns to gardening shorts for a high-profile, exclusive clientele.
Victoria & Albert Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 18 February 2018.

LONDON
Hokusai: beyond the Great Wave

Perhaps the most famous image in Japanese art is the iconic print The Great Wave, circa 1831, by Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849). The first UK exhibition to focus on the productive last 30 years of the artist's life, explores his later works both chronologically and thematically. Paintings, drawings, woodblock prints and illustrated books, from the British Museum's own collection, and loans from Japan, Europe, and the United States (many on show in the UK for the first time), reveal aspects of Hokusai's personal beliefs and interests. Among the highlights are prints from the famous series Thirty-Six Views of Mt Fuji, such as Clear day with a southern breeze ('Red Fuji'), 1831 (above), which revived his career in the early 1830s after difficulties in the previous few years. The light sensitivity of some pieces means they can only be shown for a limited period. So for conservation reasons, there will be a rotation of about half of the 110 works on display midway through the exhibition.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
From 25 May to 13 August 2017. (Closed from 3-6 July for a partial rotation of the exhibits.)

LONDON
Sargent: The Watercolours

In this exhibition some 80 works by John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) reflect the artist's technical talents and individuality during his fertile period of watercolour production between 1900 and 1918. Drawn to the flexibility of the medium, which allowed him to paint rapidly and with little preparation, Sargent used watercolour to escape the studio and work en plein air. He travelled through southern Europe and the Middle East, recording landscapes, architecture and people that he saw there. While his watercolours, such as The Church of Santa Maria della Salute, Venice, circa 1904–9 (above), and Rome: An Architectural Study, circa 1906–7, are often viewed and then overlooked as mere travel souvenirs, they actually form an important part of Sargent's oeuvre as they reveal his distinctive way of seeing and composing, using close-ups, unorthodox and obscured viewpoints and dynamic poses.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
From 21 June to 8 October 2017.

LONDON
Tunnel: The Archaeology of Crossrail

Artefacts unearthed at sites across London during the Crossrail project tell the story of 8000 years of human activity in the capital, covering many key historic events. The finds range from a Mesolithic flint scatter to a chamber-pot showing the Victorian sense of humour. Among other highlights are skeletons from the 1660s found buried in a mass grave near Liverpool Street, which tested positive for the Plague pathogen, and a rare Roman copper alloy medallion of Emperor Philip I (above), issued to mark the New Year celebrations in AD 245, only the second known example from Europe.
Museum of London Docklands
+44 (0)20 7001 9844
(www.museumoflondon.org.uk)
Until 3 September 2017.

LONDON
Canaletto and the Art of Venice

Joseph Smith (circa 1674−1770), an English merchant and later British Consul in Venice, was the greatest patron of art in the city at the time. In 1762, George III purchased almost all of Smith's paintings, which made the Royal Collection pre-eminent in 18th-century Venetian art in the world. It includes the largest number of works by Canaletto. More than 200 paintings, drawings and prints by this famous Venetian painter and his contemporaries demonstrate how they captured the allure of the city. Not only did Canaletto and others meticulously record the vibrancy of the city, they also developed the capriccio fantasies, as in Marco Riccis' Caprice View with Roman Ruins, circa 1729 (above).
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)20 7766 7300
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 19 May to 12 November 2017.

LONDON
Queer British Art 1861–1967

Marking the 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalisation of male homosexuality in England and Wales, this is the first exhibition devoted to queer British art. It explores lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) identities in the arts – from the abolition of the death penalty for sodomy in 1861 to the passing of the Sexual Offences Act in 1967. With a variety of works covering the public and the personal, the playful and the political, it looks at the role of queer art in society, coded desires, women who defied convention, and Sixties Soho. Works by Francis Bacon, Cecil Beaton, Duncan Grant, Evelyn de Morgan, and more are shown alongside films, magazines, personal photographs, ephemera, and objects such as the door from Oscar Wilde's prison cell.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
Until 1 October 2017.


LONDON
Alberto Giacometti

Best known for his elongated bronze figures, Alberto Giacometti (1901–66) was also a skilled painter and draughtsman and he sculpted in other materials. More than 250 works, including significant loans from Paris' Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti, chart his career and demonstrate how he has earned his place among the great 20th-century painter-sculptors, such as Matisse, Picasso and Degas. This exhibition examines the Swiss artist's work with Surrealism and the themes of brutality and sadism, his interest in Egyptian and African art, his fusing of ancient and modern styles, his relationship with the decorative arts, and his interest in scale and perspective. As well as his iconic bronze figures, which in their isolation personify the despair that was rife in post-war Paris, rarely seen fragile plaster works will be on show. One example is the group Women of Venice, 1956 (seen in a photograph with the artist, above), created for the Venice Biennale and now brought together for the first time since then.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(tate.org.uk)
From 10 May to
10 September 2017.

LONDON
Places of the Mind: British Watercolour Landscapes 1850–1950

The perception that the 'Great Age of British Watercolours' ended when Turner died in 1851 is being challenged in this display of 125 landscapes. Ranging from Pre-Raphaelite works by George Price Boyce and Alfred William Hunt to more abstract pieces by Henry Moore, the selection shows a variety of techniques, styles, and responses to the cultural and social shifts of the time. The landscapes bear witness to the effects of tourism, urbanisation, artists' colonies and the aftermath of war. Highlights include John Singer Sargent's View from a Window, Genoa, circa 1911 (above).
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(britishmuseum.org)
From 23 February to 27 August 2017.

LONDON
Bridget Riley: Paintings, 1963-2015

This exhibition charts Bridget Riley's dramatic use of monochrome and colour throughout her career, from her exclusively black and white paintings in the early to mid-1960s, to her transition to grey in the late 1960s and, then, on to colour. More recently she has returned to monochrome but, although Riley has taken up a palette from the past, her latest monochromatic works show new ideas developed from her paintings in colour.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 16 September 2017.

OXFORD
Raphael: The Drawings

Spanning the career of Raphael (1483–1520), from his early years in Umbria to his triumphs in Florence and Rome, this exhibition brings together over 100 works from international collections, in an attempt to transform how we look at his work by focusing on the immediacy and expressiveness of his drawings. Studies for major projects, such as the Vatican frescoes, and for Transfiguration, his final painting, which he worked on up until to his death, with drawings such as Detail of Study of Two Apostles for the 'Transfiguration' (above) reveal his astounding visual language.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
From 1 June to 3 September 2017.

 

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Past is Present: Revival Jewelry

Jewellery designers, such as Cartier, have often looked back at antique forms for inspiration – as in his
1924 winged scarab brooch (above). Reviving such ancient adornments became particularly popular in the 19th century with designers, such as Castellani, Giacinto Melillo and Eugène Fontenay, who were influenced by newly excavated artefacts. This exhibition charts 4000 years of jewellery history, balancing Egyptian, Classical and Renaissance treasures with their modern counterparts. The Cartier scarab brooch, for example, is paired
with an Ancient Egyptian winged scarab (740–660 BC). Also on show is a Bulgari necklace from the 1980s incorporating ancient Macedonian coins, and a 2002 pendant by Italian goldsmith Akelo that makes use of an Etruscan granulation technique.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 19 August 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
Eyewitness Views: Making History in Eighteenth-Century Europe

Whether they are carefully planned meetings of leading figures, people at play, or natural phenomena, key events in the 18th century were documented by artists. In European centres painters, such as Canaletto, were commissioned to capture these historic moments. The Venetian carnival, the eruption of Vesuvius, and The Flooding of Piazza Navona, 1756 (above) by Giovanni Paolo Panini, were all newsworthy scenes worth recording.
Getty Center
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 30 July 2017.

Illuminating Women in the Medieval World
Female figures of many kinds decorate the pages of medieval manuscripts – and in more ways than one. Some wealthy and high-status women commissioned books, others illuminated them. Many more women – encompassing virtuous nuns and saints, sinful adulterers, romantic lovers, nurturing mothers, and more – were depicted in these illuminations. The varied use of the female figure reveals a fascinating array of attitudes towards women in the medieval period.
Getty Center
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 17 September 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
American Indian Art from the Fenimore Art Museum: The Thaw Collection

Eugene and Clare Thaw's collection of Native North American art spans many centuries and a wide range of art forms. Sculpture, basketry, textiles, ceramics, paintings, drawings and decorative arts are all represented in this selection of 38 highlights from their collection. A Lakota (Sioux) war record painted on animal hide around 1880 (above), a waterproof Kamleika garment (or parka) made from sea-mammal gut, and a whelk shell gorget (circa 1100–1400) carved by a Mississippian sculptor show the diversity of Native American artworks.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 8 October 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Mummies

The most iconic symbol of ancient Egypt is the mummy. This exhibition reveals the secrets of mummification using modern scientific techniques, rare artefacts and cutting-edge imagery. Egyptian mummies are displayed alongside others from Peru, where numerous different cultures practised mummification thousands of years ago.
American Museum of Natural History
+1 212 769 5100
(www.amnh.org)
Until 7 January 2018.



NEW YORK, New York
Paradise of Exiles: Early Photography in Italy

Daguerreotypes and photographs from Italy, dating from between 1839 (the year photography was invented) and 1871 (the year Italy became a unified nation), are brought together in this exhibition to give a picture of the country as an important centre of exchange and experimentation in the development of this new medium, with foreign travellers capturing its distinctive monuments and landscapes. One example is Temple of Vesta, circa 1855 (above), a salted paper print by Pietro Dovizielli (1804–85). This show celebrates the little-known contribution of Italian photographers to the early decades of the new art form, and also reflects how they used daguerreotypes and paper negatives to represent their cultural heritage at a time of great political change.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 13 August 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Noah's Beasts: Sculpted Animals from Ancient Mesopotamia

Images of animals in Mesopotamian sculptures crafted in stone, such as Ewe and Ram Flanking Plant with a Gatepost, Late Uruk period, circa 3500–3100 BC (above), and also in metal, such as silver with inlays of shell and lapis lazuli, reflect the role of animals in religion and ancient agrarian societies, and illustrate the connection between humankind and the rest of the natural world. On show will be: sculptural works from circa 3300–2250 BC, which reveal the attention to naturalistic detail combined with elements of stylisation; cylinder seals, including one depicting animals behaving like humans, and clay tablets, including one from 1646 BC inscribed with The Deluge Story (perhap a prototype for the biblical story of Noah's Flood).
The Morgan Library and Museum
+1 212 685 0008
(www.themorgan.org)
From 26 May to 27 August 2017.


NEW YORK, New York
Splendors of Korean Art

Loans from the National Museum of Korea, including Silla gold jewellery and pottery, Goryeo Buddhist sculpture, celadon ware and Joseon porcelain and paintings, join pieces from the Met's own collections to present a chronological tour of Korea's art history from the Late Bronze Age to the 21st century. In more than 70 works displayed, the highlights include the Goryeo Buddhist 14th-century gilded Amitabha Triad (above) from the National Museum of Korea, which is shown near the Met's 7th-century Pensive Bodhisattva and 17th-century Seated Bodhisattva, reflecting the long-continued tradition of Buddhist art. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 20 27 37 45 15
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 17 September 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
Infinite Blue

The colour blue has been used to represent spirituality, power, status and beauty in a range of cultures throughout history. Following one common strand, the blue artworks on display from across the globe reveal information about cultural values, technological advances, and international trade. As part of  A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum (a series of exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Elizabeth A Sackler Center for Feminist Art), Infinite Blue features paintings, prints, drawings, decorative arts, printed books and more. Among the highlights are illuminated manuscripts exemplifying the use of blue in Christian iconography, early Chinese blue-and-white porcelain, and a stunning blue faience, late 2nd-century statuette of Aphrodite (above) from Ptolemaic Egypt.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 5 November 2017.

NEW YORK, New York
A Woman's Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt

Also part of the Brooklyn Museum's series A Year of Yes, this exhibition delves into the ancient Egyptian belief that to make rebirth possible for a deceased woman, she must briefly turn into a man long enough to create a foetus. This is because, according to Egyptian medicine, the man creates the foetus and passes it on to the woman during sex. Evidence for this post-mortem gender transformation can be seen in coffins on which a woman is depicted with red skin (more commonly a male attribute) and on which spells that address the deceased with masculine pronouns are recorded. As well as painted sarcophagi, like the Coffin of the Lady of the House, circa 1292-1190 BC (above), small statuettes are on display, showing the woman returned to her female state after recreating herself for rebirth.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until end 2017.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
America Collects Eighteenth-Century French Painting

Many 18th-century French paintings that have ended up in collections across America owe their fate to Napoleon's older brother, Joseph Bonaparte. When he fled across the Atlantic in 1815, Joseph Bonaparte took his collection of art by the likes of Jacques Louis David, Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, Hubert Robert and Jean Honoré Fragonard with him. He put them on public display, igniting a widespread passion for French art across the United States. Portraits, landscapes, still lifes and scenes from antiquity and Classical mythology – such as Louis Jean François Lagrenée's Pygmalion and Galatea, 1784 (above) and François André Vincent's Arria and Paetus, 1784, both by famous and less well-known artists, all became hugely popular.
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
Until 20 August 2017.

AUSTRALIA
MELBOURNE
Gods, Myths and Mortals: Greek Treasures Across the Millennia from the Benaki Museum

On long-term loan from Athens' Benaki Museum, a spectacular array of artefacts traces 8000 years of Greek civilisation – from Neolithic pottery, Cycladic sculpture and Mycenaean jewellery, to Byzantine icons and manuscripts, and weapons belonging to 19th-century revolutionaries. They all shed light on Greek culture and history, focusing on themes such as mythology, trade, force, expression and identity.
Hellenic Museum
+61 3 8615 9016
(www.hellenic.org.au)
Until 2024.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
French Painting

The story of 150 years of French painting, between 1800 and 1950, is told in masterpieces from the Glyptotek collection that emphasise the inventiveness of art during this period. The exhibition travels backwards through time, featuring work by Manet, Monet, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Degas – including his Jockeys Before the Race, circa 1888 (above) – and other artists active in France. Although the focus is on paintings, drawings and small sculptures also make an appearance, reflecting the different ways in which artists strove for originality.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
Until 31 December 2017.

COPENHAGEN
War and Storm: Treasures from the sea around Sicily

Warships destroyed in sea battles and merchant vessels wrecked off the coast of Sicily over three millennia have yielded extraordinary objects that form the basis of this exhibition. Highlighting the importance of the island as a key spot for trade and cultural exchanges as well as the dangers of travelling by sea, Phoenician, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Arab and Norman artefacts are all on show. Helmets and beak-heads speak of naval battles fought long ago, while amphorae, since taken over by coral (below), reflect the trade networks along with grander items, such as a life-size elephant's foot cast in bronze, which was probably part of a complete bronze elephant, the rest of which remains lost beneath the waves.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
From 6 April to 20 August 2017.

FRANCE
PARIS
Jardins

Gardens have long been a passion for many people, artists included. These stimulating, multi-sensory spaces have a scientific element as botanical collections, but can also be considered as works of art. This exhibition brings together paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings and more, to portray the garden as an art form. Works by Dürer, Cézanne, Klimt and others span the centuries and capture the spirit of the garden.
Grand Palais
+33 1 44 13 17 17
(www.grandpalais.fr)
Until 24 July 2017.

PARIS
The Islamic Treasures of Africa: From Timbuktu to Zanzibar

Begining in the 8th century, when Islam started to extend its influence into sub-Saharan Africa, this exhibition of 300 multi-disciplinary works draws on archaeology, architecture, photography and contemporary art to build a comprehensive picture of spiritual and cultural exchanges between the Maghreb and the Middle East. Trade, travel, religious practices, magic, art, craftsmanship and writing all played their part, and all are represented, using artefacts such as amulets, jewellery, Tuareg leather goods and sacred texts.
Institut du Monde Arabe
+33 1 44 13 17 17
(www.imarabe.org)
Until 30 July 2017.

PARIS
The Power of Flowers: Pierre-Joseph Redouté

Often dubbed 'the Raphael of Flowers', Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759–1840), combined science and art in his accurate botanical paintings. He recorded new plants, collected from all over the globe, that appeared in gardens, reproducing them meticulously and elegantly in watercolour on vellum. Appointed painter to Empress Joséphine and Queen Marie-Amélie, he was also an engraver, a publisher and a teacher. In this, the first exhibition in France completely dedicated to Redouté and his influence, more than 250 works on loan from various museums around the country will be on show.
Musée de la Vie Romantique
+33 1 55 31 95 67
(museevieromantique.paris.fr)
Until 1 October 2017.

GREECE
ATHENS
Odysseys

Odysseus' long and perilous voyage home after the Trojan War is one of the most popular tales from ancient Greece. Rather than retelling Homer's Odyssey, through ancient artefacts this show explores themes, like taming the environment and broadening horizons.
National Archaeological Museum
+30 21 3214 4890
(www.namuseum.gr)
Until 30 September 2017.

ITALY
ROME
Menorah: Worship, History and Legend

On show in two locations in Rome – the Vatican Museums and the Hebrew Museum – this major exhibition takes a close look at the menorah and how it became a significant symbol of Judaism after the Second Temple's destruction at the hands of the Romans. Of particular note is the 1st-century Magdala Stone, which carries the oldest known carving of the menorah and which is on public display for the first time. A wide array of ancient artefacts is displayed, and the story of the menorah is told right up to the 21st century. On this fascinating journey, visitors will encounter the menorah in Christian iconography and in works by artists such as Nicolas Poussin and Marc Chagall.
Museo Ebraico di Roma and
Musei Vaticani
+39 06 6840061/+39 06 69884676
(www.museoebraico.roma.it/www.museivaticani.va)
Until 23 July 2017.

VENICE
Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable

For the first time, the two venues of the Pinault Collection in Venice (Palazzo Grasso and Punta della Dogana) are devoted to the work of a single artist – Damien Hirst. In this ambitious, sprawling and bizarre exhibition, the artist not only imagined the precious artefacts on board a fictional ancient wreck, named the Unbelievable, he had them constructed, deposited them on the seabed for 10 years and then recovered them. Now, the head of Medusa (above), a statue of Proteus, a sphinx and the skull of a Cyclops feature in an exhibition that turns art and archaeology on its head.
Palazzo Grassi and
Punta della Dogana
+39 041 2401 308
(www.palazzograssi.it)
Until 3 December 2017.

MONACO
MONACO
The Forbidden City in Monaco: Court Life of the Emperors and Empresses of China

Charting the cultural and artistic excellence of the lengthy Qing Dynasty (1644–1911), China's last imperial dynasty, this exhibition brings together an exceptional range of objects from the former imperial collections, some of which have never before been on show outside of the Imperial Palace. The spectacular items offer insights into the emperors' everyday lives, personal passions – private collections, and their interest in science.
Grimaldi Forum
+377 99 99 20 00
(www.grimaldiforum.com)
From 4 July to 10 September 2017.


Borderline
A dozen vast works by Philippe Pasque, seven on display for the first time, explore the notion of limits and challenge society's relationship with nature, particularly the fear of and fascination with the marine world, and commitments to protecting biodiversity in the oceans. Pasque's giant silver shark in a piece called Who should be scared? 2016 (above), is one of the pieces on show.
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco
+377 93 15 36 00
(www.oceano.org)
From 5 May to 30 September 2017.

NETHERLANDS


AMSTERDAM
New Realities: Photography in the 19th Century

Some 300 photographs from the Rijksmuseum's substantial collection show the variety of works produced in the new medium after its invention in 1839. All dating from the 19th century, the pieces on show include portraits, nudes, cityscapes, travel photographs, scientific, commercial and amateur snapshots. Work by anonymous and famous photographers, such as William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron, Roger Fenton and Robert Macpherson, including his Rome, 1860–63 (below), is on display. Among the highlights are images by the first woman photographer Anna Atkins (1799–1871), also credited with publishing the first book illustrated with photographs. Running at the same time is Sea Views, a show of contemporary photographic seascapes.
Rijksmuseum
+31 20 6747 000
(www.rijksmuseum.nl)
Until 17 September 2017.


THE HAGUE
The Discovery of Mondrian

As part of the year-long celebration, Mondrian to Dutch design: 100 years of De Stijl, the Gemeentemuseum is, for the first time, exhibiting its entire Mondrian collection – the biggest in the world. More than 300 works covering every stage of his career – from his landscapes, painted in and around Amsterd,am and Domburg, to his iconic grid paintings, such as Composition with red, black, yellow, blue and gray, 1921 (above) – will be on show. There will also be letters, photographs and personal belongings (such as the artist's collection of gramophone records), including objects that are normally considered too fragile to display. To complete the scene, there will also be reconstructions of Mondrian's Amsterdam, Paris and New York studios.
Gemeentemuseum
+31 (0)70 3381111
(www.gemeentemuseum.nl)
3 June to 24 September 2017.

RUSSIA
ST PETERSBURG
19th-Century German and Austrian Painting from the Mansion of Baron Stieglitz

While restoration work on Baron Stieglitz's mansion on the English Embankment in St Petersburg is underway, the State Hermitage is taking care of some of the works from the house. During the 19th century, Baron Alexander Stieglitz, a banker and patron of the arts, bought and commissioned paintings by contemporary German and Austrian artists to decorate his state rooms. He selected works by Moritz von Schwind, Hans Makart, Hans von Marées, Albert Zimmermann, and others, which have now been put on public
display for the first time.
State Hermitage Museum
+7 812 710 90 79
(www.hermitagemuseum.org)
Until 27 September 2017.

SPAIN


BILBAO
Paris, Fin de Siècle: Signac, Redon, Toulouse-Lautrec and Their Contemporaries

At the end of the 19th century, Neo-Impressionists, Symbolists and Les Nabis were among the many artists operating in Paris. There was a revival in printmaking and much political and social upheaval at the time. Rarely seen works from private European collections by the likes of Paul Signac, Odilon Redon and Pierre Bonnard, and also well-known images, such as Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec's colour lithograph Jane Avril, 1899 (above) show how lively Paris was at the fin de siècle.
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.es)
Until 17 September 2017.

MADRID
Pity and Terror: Picasso's Path to Guernica

It is now 80 years since the Basque town of Guernica was destroyed by aerial bombing during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso created his iconic painting Guernica (above) for the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne in that same year, 1937. This vast and haunting monochrome canvas truly captures the chaos and violence of war, evoking pity and terror, which are two of the key themes in this exhibition. Documentary sources from 1937–49, including correspondence and photographs, relating to Picasso's masterpiece tell the story of its origin, its showing in exhibitions and the reactions to it.
Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía
+34 91 774 1000
(museoreinasofia.es)
Until 4 September 2017.

Renaissance Venice: The Triumph of Beauty and the Destruction of Painting
Paintings, sculptures, prints and books are used to capture the spirit of 16th-century Venetian art, which had a distinctive use of chiaroscuro and colour, and paid close attention to nature. Exquisite works by Titian, Tintoretto, Bassano, Giorgione, Lotto and Veronese, including his Jupiter and a Nude, 1560 (above) are all on show, many borrowed from major collections. Focusing on the subjects depicted, the exhibition is organised thematically and explores subjects such as Classicism, Orientalism, women, power and melancholy.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 24 September 2017.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM


CAMBRIDGE
Ancient and Classical Worlds Summer Programme

With a rich selection of courses on a range of past cultures and civilisations – from Ancient Egyptian religion to Greek philosophy, from the beginnings of astronomy to early imperialism, this programme offers four courses (two per week), evening talks and a series of plenary lectures on the theme of Connections and Conflicts. You can book for either one or two weeks.
9–22 July
Institute of Continuing Education University of Cambridge
(www.ice.cam.ac.uk/course/ancient-and-classical-worlds-summer- programme)

LEEDS
Celebrating Hercules in the Modern World

This conference looks at the work carried out in a large-scale project on the reception of Hercules in post-Classical culture. The topics explored include: Hercules as an allegorical figure in medieval Italian literature and art; as the embodiment of virtue and political uses of the hero in the Early Modern period; and also his appearance in drama, opera, film, radio, video games, children's literature and contemporary art, from the 19th century to the present.
7–9 July
University of Leeds
(www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/events/20047/thisyear)

LONDON
REVEAL Festival

A week-long public festival celebrates the opening of the V&A's Exhibition Road Quarter (above) designed by Amanda Levete and her practice, AL_A. There will be art, design and fashion events, performances and collaborations with other institutions around the Albertopolis, including the Natural History Museum, the Science Museum, Imperial College London, the Royal Albert Hall and the Royal College of Music.
30 June–7 July
V&A
(www.vam.ac.uk)

Summer School in Homer
Discover more about Homeric language and literature on this five-day intensive course. Classes will cover gods and goddesses, women, heroism, the Homeric question, and Homer's legacy, in diverse media such as cinema and modern poetry.
17–21 July
University College London
(www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/outreach/schools-colleges/classics/outreach/summer-schools/summerschoolinhomer)

Summer School in Ancient Philosophy
This five-day course covers all the major themes and thinkers of ancient philosophy, examining their views and assessing their importance today. Topics explored will include: ethics, political philosophy, early scientific theories, metaphysics and theories of knowledge and the philosophers – Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, the Stoics and the Sceptics. There is also an option to study the texts in English rather than in Greek and Latin.
24–28 July
University College London
(www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/outreach/schools-colleges/classics/outreach/summer-schools/summer-school-ancient-philosophy)

SWANSEA
Summer School in Ancient Languages

Swansea University offers intensive summer courses (the equivalent of one term at university level) in ancient Greek and Latin for all levels from beginners to advanced, and in Egyptian and Medieval Latin for beginners and post-beginners.
23 July–5 August
Swansea University
(www.swansea.ac.uk/classics/summerschoolinancientlanguages)

VARIOUS LOCATIONS
Festival of Archaeology

Coordinated by the Council for British Archaeology, the annual Festival of Archaeology consists of a wide range of events taking place across the UK. There are plenty of chances to get involved with the archaeology of all periods at talks, guided walks, demonstrations, excavation open days and more.
15–30 July
(www.archaeologyfestival.org.uk)

CANADA
QUEBEC & MONTREAL
Tenth Celtic Conference in Classics

This year the Celtic Conference in Classics crosses the Atlantic for the first time and will be held in Canada. It will include panels of expert speakers discussing fundamental questions in Classical studies. Topics, such as Plato, identity in Greek oratory, the reception of ancient drama, landscapes of war, Roman military history, conscience and consciousness, and epic and elegy, will be explored.
19–22 July
McGill University/
Université de Montréal
(www.celticconferenceclassics.com)

 

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