Events


UNITED KINGDOM

BRISTOL
Grayson Perry: The Most Popular Art Exhibition Ever!

Featuring more than 25 of this popular artist's latest works in a variety of media, Grayson Perry's show explores how contemporary art can speak to a diverse cross-section of society. Ceramics, such as Puff Piece, 2016 (above), bronzes, cast iron, tapestry and prints are all used to tackle themes of masculinity, sex, class, religion, popularity and art, and contemporary political issues like Brexit. After a highly successful summer stint at the Serpentine Gallery in London, the exhibition is on show outside the capital for the first time.
Arnolfini
+44 (0)117 917 2300
(www.arnolfini.org.uk)
Until 24 December 2017.

CAMBRIDGE
Degas: A passion for perfection

The Fitzwilliam's collection of paintings, drawings, etchings, pastels, monotypes and sculptures in bronze and wax, counterproofs, and letters by Degas – the most extensive and representative in the UK – will be put on display to mark the centenary of the artist's death on 27 September 1917. Exploring how Degas experimented with techniques, repeatedly reworked compositions and poses, and drew inspiration from Old Masters and Classical antiquity, the exhibition has sculptures of dancers, charcoal drawings of female bathers, and scenes of café life. Among the works on show are a group of drawings from King's College Cambridge, bequeathed in 1946 by John Maynard Keynes, who bought them in 1918 and 1919 from Degas' posthumous studio sales in Paris.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 3 October 2017 to
14 January 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Sampled Lives: Samplers from the Fitzwilliam Museum

More than 100 embroidered and stitched samplers offer a rare glimpse into the lives of ordinary young women in the past. The pieces, whose makers range in date from mid-17th-century English Quakers to early 20th-century school pupils, give an insight into education, employment, family, status and needlework skills.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 8 April 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Another India: Explorations and Expressions of Indigenous South Asia

Marking the 70th anniversary of India's independence from Britain and the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, this exhibition presents more than 100 artefacts, paintings and photographs from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology collections (some on show for the first time) along with work by contemporary artists in an exploration of the diverse minority populations of India. Together, the pieces on display tell the story of colonialism, British involvement in the subcontinent, and collecting.
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
+44 (0)1223 333516
(maa.cam.ac.uk)
Until 22 April 2018.


EDINBURGH
Splendours of the Subcontinent: A Prince's Tour of India 1875–6

As part of the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, gifts presented to Edward, Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII, on his 1875–76 tour of India, Sri Lanka and Nepal are on show. It is the first time the gifts – exquisite examples of Indian craftsmanship, including gold and silverware, ceremonial arms and jewellery such as the sirpech (turban ornament) presented by Sajjan Singh, Maharaja of Udaipur (above) – have been displayed together since the late 19th century. Watercolours and photographs help to tell the story of the royal visit.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 15 December to
15 April 2018.


EDINBURGH
Constable and McTaggart

John Constable's impact on Scottish landscape painter William McTaggart (1835–1910) is examined in this display, which includes Constable's monumental Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows, 1831 (above) and McTaggart's The Storm, 1890. McTaggart saw Constable's paintings a number of times during the 19th century, but his style changed in the 1880s when 118 works by Constable were on display in Edinburgh. Constable's influence can be seen in The Storm – in the scale of the painting, the depiction of the approaching storm, and in the use of a variety of brush strokes.
Scottish National Gallery
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 25 March 2018.

LIVERPOOL
John Piper

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral was consecrated 50 years ago and this exhibition marks the occasion by honouring British artist John Piper (1903–92), who designed many of its stained-glass windows, including the centrepiece of the cathedral. More than 40 of his works, particularly painting and collages, chart Piper's career, his relationship with major international artists, such as Jean Arp and Georges Braque, and his influence on British art from the 1930s. His work shows a fondness for his native landscapes and an understanding of earlier art forms, such as Anglo-Saxon carving and medieval stained-glass windows.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 17 November to 18 March 2018.

LIVERPOOL
Surrealism in Egypt: Art et Liberté 1938–1948
Surrealist art in Egypt, produced by a collective of artists and writers in Cairo, has often been overlooked, but it is a distinct episode in the story of the movement. The majority of this material – comprising more than 100 paintings, photographs, film and archival documents – has not been seen before in the UK, and it reveals the socio-political motivations that drove the Art et Liberté group. They published their manifesto Long Live Degenerate Art in 1938, in response to the local rise of fascism and, in the following decade, young intellectuals eager for reform created a variety of work. Themes explored include womens issues and police brutality.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 17 November to 18 March 2018.



LONDON
The Business of Prints

Drawing from the UK's national collection of more than two million prints, this exhibition focuses on their use as objects of trade before the invention of photography, their production, their lettering, how they were used and collected, and their quality. Works by Dürer, Rembrandt and Goya are displayed alongside those by less familiar artists, offering a range of interesting and varied images. Highlights include: sundials to cut out and assemble, a prompt for an early form of karaoke and an anonymous etching by a 16th-century Flemish artist of a rabbit, used for target practice (above).
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8181
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 28 January 2018.

LONDON
Fairgrounds of the Faithful: Moulids – the Sufi Festivals of Egypt
For nearly three decades now the award-winning photographer and documentary maker, Tim Coleman, has been recording festivals called Moulids held by Sufis in Egypt. This exhibition brings together a collection of his images that reveal the remarkable nature of these festivals, celebrating the birth of the founders of particular Sufi orders.
Brunei Galley, SOAS
+44 (0)20 7898 4915
(www.soas.ac.uk/gallery)
Until 16 December 2017.

LONDON
Tove Jansson (1914–2001)

Most famous for her creation, the Moomins, Finnish artist Tove Jansson was also a prolific painter of landscapes, still-lifes and self-portraits. This retrospective brings together 150 works in diverse media to show her wide-ranging talent. As well as Surrealist-inspired works from the 1930s and abstract compositions from the 1960s, her illustrations, sketches for the Moomin characters, and book jacket designs are on display. Among the highlights are her bold anti-war cartoons for the liberal political satire magazine Garm. Jansson started drawing for Garm when she was only 15, and went on to produce more than 500 caricatures and over 100 covers for the publication.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
Until 28 January 2018.

LONDON
Poor Art/Arte Povera: Italian Influences, British Responses

Turin and Rome during the late 1960s, witnessed a period of social and economic change, artists were experimenting and rejecting traditional practices and materials in favour of everyday materials and the unconventional. This movement was dubbed Arte Povera (Poor Art) in 1967 by the critic and curator Germano Celant. Now, 50 years on, this show explores the emergence of Arte Povera and how it influenced British artists who graduated from art schools in the 1970s and 1980s.
Estorick Collection
+44 (0)20 7704 9522
(www.estorickcollection.com)
Until 17 December 2017.



LONDON
Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael around 1500

A selection of eight choice works by Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael tell the story of the complex and, at times, rivalrous relationship between these three Renaissance artists, and how they revolutionised art at the start of the 16th century. The centrepiece of the display is Michelangelo's sculpture The Virgin and Child with the Infant St John,1504–05 (above), also known as the Taddei Tondo, on loan from the Royal Academy of Arts. It will return there in 2018 and go on show in an exhibition marking the 250th anniversary of the RA and the redevelopment linking Burlington House with Burlington Gardens.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 28 January 2018.


LONDON

Monochrome: Painting in Black and White
This exhibition sets out to show that, in art, colour is a choice, not a necessity. More than 50 painted works on glass, vellum, wood, ceramic, silk and canvas produced over a span of seven centuries introduce different aspects of painting in black, white and grey or grisaille, the grey shading often used to imitate sculpture, as in the oil painting by Ingres, Odalisque in Grisaille, circa 1824–34 (above). Pieces range from medieval stained glass to Olafur Eilasson's light installation. The work of Dürer, Rembrandt and other masters is shown with that of contemporary artists, such as Gerhard Richter, Bridget Riley and Chuck Close.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 18 February 2018.



LONDON
Reflections: Van Eyck and the Pre-Raphaelites

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood admired Jan van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait of 1434, acquired by the National Gallery in 1842, and the painting shaped their views on draughtsmanship, colour, technique and the symbolic meanings of objects. Now, for the first time, this 15th-century masterpiece will be shown alongside works that it inspired by Rossetti, Holman Hunt, Millais and others. Their representation of domestic scenes and the use of convex mirrors to depict real and illusory spaces, as in The Bath of Venus, 1898–1904, by Charles Haslewood Shannon (above), were all influenced by Van Eyck.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 2 April 2018.



LONDON
Charles II: Art & Power

After years of puritanical rule under Cromwell, the Restoration in 1660, brought renewed interest in the arts in England. King Charles II was a great patron of the arts, but the works he acquired not only served to adorn the royal apartments, but also reinforced his position and glorified the monarchy. Fine portraits, Old Master paintings, such as Orazio Gentileschi's A Sibyl, circa 1635–38 (above), tapestries, furniture and silver-gilt objects reveal how all the arts served to enhance the king's image.
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 8 December to 13 May 2018.



LONDON
Matisse in the Studio

Henri Matisse was a great collector of different types of art, including: Buddhist statues from Thailand; Bamana figures from Mali; Chinese calligraphy; textiles and furniture from North America. These objects were displayed in his studio and, as this exhibition shows, influenced his work. Paintings, such as The Moorish Screen, 1921 (above), sculptures, and drawings are displayed alongside the objects that inspired them.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 12 November 2017.



LONDON
Jasper Johns: 'Something Resembling Truth'

Paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints by the American artist Jasper Johns (b 1930) chart his career over the past six decades, focusing on continuity and change, and experimentation. The works feature familiar images, such as Flag, 1958 (above), targets, numbers, maps and light bulbs, reflecting his distinctive treatment of everyday objects.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 10 December 2017.



LONDON
From Life

Both life drawing and drawing from Classical and Renaissance sculpture used to play an important part in an artist's training, as can be seen in Thomas Rowlandson's Drawing from Life at the Royal Academy, 1808 (above). From Life surveys these practices – from the earliest days of the Royal Academy to today, with a range of media by contemporary artists experimenting with new technologies.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 11 December to 11 March 2018.



LONDON
The EY Exhibition: Impressionists in London, French Artists in Exile (1870–1904)

During the Franco-Prussian War, some of the great French artists of the 19th century sought refuge in Britain. Here, they were interested in differences in social life: in parks, for example (walking on the grass was prohibited in formal French gardens), at regattas and in social codes. Monet's and Sisley's Thames riverscapes, Pissarro's suburbian scenes and Tissot's fashionable events, such as The Ball on Shipboard, circa 1874 (above), all show an outsider's view of British society.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 2 November to 7 May 2018.



LONDON
Red Star over Russia: A Revolution in Visual Culture 1905–55

Nina Vatolina's Fascism – The Most Evil Enemy of Women. Everyone to the Struggle Against Fascism, 1941 (above) is among the revolutionary material drawn from the collection of graphic designer David King (1943–2016). Together it provides an exciting visual history of Russia and the Soviet Union – from the overthrow of the last Tsar to the Civil War and the rise of Stalin. This show of dynamic posters, paintings, photographs and books marks the centenary of the October Revolution.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 8 November to
18 February 2018.

LONDON
Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic

As well as providing an insight into the creation of the beloved bear and the interplay between AA Milne's storytelling and EH Shepard's illustrations, this show looks at the lasting popularity of Winnie-the-Pooh. Original drawings and manuscripts are shown alongside a range of items, such as ceramics and clothes, all featuring Winnie-the-Pooh and his companions Christopher Robin, Eeyore, Piglet and Tigger.
Victoria and Albert Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 9 December until
8 April 2018.

LONDON
El Greco to Goya: Spanish Masterpieces from The Bowes Museum

The Bowes Museum in County Durham is home to one of the largest collections of Spanish art in the UK. Now works from this collection are on show at the Wallace Collection – this is a collaboration between two museums both established, for the good of the nation, by the illegitimate sons of aristocratic fathers. Spanning three centuries of social, political, and religious change, as well as developments in style and subject matter, this exhibition includes works by El Greco and Goya, as well as by less familiar figures such as Antonio de Pereda.
Wallace Collection
+44 (0)207 563 9500
(www.wallacecollection.org)
Until 7 January 2018.


LONDON
Drawn in Colour: Degas from the Burrell

Another exhibition commemorating the centenary of Degas' death, this show presents a group of works by the artist from the Burrell Collection in Glasgow alongside others from the National Galley and other collections. Sir William Burrell (1861–1958), a shipping magnate, collected a large number of Degas pastels from throughout his career that illustrate some of the artist's favourite subjects. The Green Ballet Skirt, circa 1896 (above), shows his love of ballet, while pictures of horse-racing and private scenes of women at their toilette also appealed to him. Degas turned to pastel when his eyesight began to fail, and bold colours became important in contemporary art. Most of these pictures have not been seen outside Glasgow since they were brought here in the early 20th century.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 20 September 2017 to
7 May 2018.


LONDON
Dalí/Duchamp
Two highly original artists Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968) and Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) met in the 1930s and remained friends until Duchamp's death. As well as looking at the personal links between the two Surrealists, this exhibition examines their aesthetic and philosophical connections through more than 80 works, including of Duchamp's masterpiece, The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915 (Richard Hamilton's 1965–6/85 reconstruction, is shown above). Duchamp's 'readymades', notably a 1964 replica of his iconic urinal, which he called Fountain, 1917, and Dalí's iconic Lobster Telephone, 1938, are also on show, as well as paintings, sculpture and archival material – all imaginative pieces exploring how the two artists treated the body and the object, with subjects as divers as time and space, energy, gravity and quantum theory.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 7 October 2017 to
3 January 2018.

LONDON
Adam Nathaniel Furman: The Roman Singularity
Coinciding with the 15th London Design Festival, a city of 3D-printed models by architectural designer Adam Nathaniel Furman encapsulates Rome's significance as a destination for thinkers, full of history and art throughout the centuries. Accompanying the city is a new work by Furman, Pasteeshio. Made from 3D-printed glazed ceramics arranged into a larger composition, the sculpture sits alongside Pasticcio, the column of fragments made by Sir John Soane, prompting comparisons between the 19th- and 21st-century works.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+ 44 (0) 20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
From 16 September to
10 December 2017.

LONDON
Egypt Uncovered: Belzoni and the Tomb of Pharaoh Seti I

To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Giovanni Battista Belzoni's discovery of the tomb of Seti I on 17 October 1817, this exhibition tells the story of the extraordinary former circus strongman and Seti I's white alabaster sarcophagus. It charts the sarcophagus' long journey to London, including the party Soane threw to mark the arrival of his prized acquisition.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+ 44 (0) 20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
From 11 October 2017
to 14 April 2018.



LONDON
Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion

The influential Spanish designer Cristóbal Balenciaga (1895–1972) developed some famous shapes in fashion such as the tunic, the sack, the baby doll and the shift dress. After starting up in San Sebastian, he opened his famous fashion-house in Paris 80 years ago, but the 1950s and 1960s are considered his most creative years and are the focal point of this show. As well as garments and hats by Balenciaga and his followers, X-rays (examining how innovative structures were achieved), sketches, patterns and fabric samples are on view. There are also charming photographs, such as Dovima with Sacha, cloche and suit by Balenciaga, Café des Deux Magots, Paris, 1955, by Richard Avedon (above) to amuse. Mainly drawn from the V&A's own Balenciaga collection begun by Cecil Beaton in the 1970s, the clothes on show bear witness to a versatile designer who could create everything from ballgowns to gardening shorts for a high-profile, exclusive clientele.
Victoria & Albert Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 18 February 2018.

OXFORD
Bodleian Treasures: 21 pairs and a Tropical Forest

This selection of highlights from 12 million items in the Bodleian's extensive collections reveals some renowned rarities alongside less familiar treasures. Among them are: Shakespeare's First Folio, Handel's Messiah, William Blake's Marriage of Heaven and Hell and the illustrated Sanskrit religious text Shikshapatri.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 287400
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until 11 February 2018.

UNITED STATES



BOSTON, Massachusetts
Showdown! Kuniyoshi vs Kunisada

The rvivlary between the two best-selling, 19th-century, Japanese, ukiyo-e woodblock print designers, Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1786–1864) and Utagawa Kunisada (1797–1861), still rages on in this exhibition drawn from the MFA's own collections. With his elegant portrayals of historical scenes and of women, as in The In-demand Type (above) from the series Thirty-two Physiognomic Types in the Modern World, from the 1820s, Kunisada was more popular in his day. But, today, his dynamic tattooed warriors and supernatural monsters, the precursors of magna and anime, means Kuniyoshi is more celebrated. After seeing how both artists treated the same subjects and borrowed from each other's styles, visitors can chose which one they prefer.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 10 December 2017.

BOSTON, Massachusetts
Follow the North Star: Inuit Art from the Collection of Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh

As the Canadian Confederation reaches its 150th anniversary, the Museum of Fine Arts is marking the milestone with a presentation of Inuit prints from the collection of portrait photographer Yousuf Karsh and his wife Estrellita. Most of the pieces are stonecuts, printed from blocks of soapstone, and stem from the printmaking cooperative at Cape Dorset, north of Hudson Bay, where the technique was introduced in the late 1950s. Works by prominent Inuit artists, such as Kenojuak Ashevak, Agnes Nanogak, Jessie Oonark, Pudlo Pudlat, and Lucy Qinnuayuak explore the themes of family, hunting, shamanism, and tradition and modernity. A selection of small-scale sculptures is also on show.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 31 December 2017.


LOS ANGELES, California
Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas

As part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a programme of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles, this show looks at the development of luxury arts, which were key-bearers of meaning, through more than 300 exquisite artefacts, from about 1200 BC to the start of European colonisation in the 16th century. Metals were used mainly for ritual objects and regalia, with gold most often associated with gods and rulers The gold, turquoise and wood, Moche earspool (above) dates from AD 640–80 and depicts a warrior. Yet jade was more precious to the Olmecs and the Maya, and feathers and textiles were important to the Incas and their predecessors.
Getty Center
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 28 January 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Proof: Francisco Goya, Sergei Eisenstein, Robert Longo

Although produced centuries apart, prints by Goya, films by Sergei Eisenstein and charcoal drawings by the contemporary artist Robert Longo have similarities in form, content and purpose. The works in this exhibition – which are all monochromatic – depict moments of social, cultural and political importance over the centuries. They also highlight the pivotal role of the artist as a powerful, but emotive, witness to dramatic events – ranging from a mutiny on a battleship to the brutal behaviour of riot police at a protest.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 7 January 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Leonardo to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection
Over the course of 60 years, banker Robert Lehman acquired 2,600 works of western European art (dating from the 14th to the 20th century) and he bequeathed this substantial collection to the Met. Some 55 drawings by acclaimed artists from the Renaissance to the early 20th century, including Leonardo, Dürer, Rembrandt, Seurat and Matisse, have been selected to represent a vast array of styles, genres and techniques.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 7 January 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer
Dubbed Il Divino (The Divine One) by his contemporaries because of his extraordinary, wide-ranging artistic abilities – in drawing, design, sculpture, painting and architecture, Michelangelo Buonarroti is one of the most esteemed Renaissance artists. This show brings together drawings, sculpture, his earliest painting and a wooden architectural model to show why Michelangelo earned such a lofty epithet.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 13 November to
12 February 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Soulful Creatures: Animal Mummies in Ancient Egypt
Examining the mummification of animals offers a chance to understand their role in both the natural and supernatural worlds of ancient Egypt. Cats, dogs, birds and snakes are among the animal mummies, from at least 31 different cemeteries, that are displayed in this exhibition, along with artefacts that explore their ritual use from 3000 BC to the end of the 2nd century AD. Among the highlights is the elaborate and expensive ibis mummy from the early Roman period, wrapped in dyed linen strips to form a herringbone pattern. CT scans reveal new insights into the mummies' contents, and show how some priests misled worshippers.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
From 29 September 2017 to
21 January 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Modigliani Unmasked

Early drawings by Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920) collected by his friend and first patron Paul Alexandre are on display (many for the first time in the US) in this exploration of how the artist's heritage as an Italian Sephardic Jew has influenced his work. Modigliani arrived in Paris in 1906 at a time when anti-Semitism was rife in the city. His drawings, paintings and sculptures respond to the social issues of the era, multiculturalism, and thoughts on identity.
The Jewish Museum
+1 212 423 3200
(thejewishmuseum.org)
From 15 September 2017 to
4 February 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Mummies

The most iconic symbol of ancient Egypt is the mummy. This exhibition reveals the secrets of mummification using modern scientific techniques, rare artefacts and cutting-edge imagery. Egyptian mummies are displayed alongside others from Peru, where numerous different cultures practised mummification thousands of years ago.
American Museum of Natural History
+1 212 769 5100
(www.amnh.org)
Until 7 January 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
A Woman's Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt

Also part of the Brooklyn Museum's series A Year of Yes, this exhibition delves into the ancient Egyptian belief that to make rebirth possible for a deceased woman, she must briefly turn into a man long enough to create a foetus. This is because, according to Egyptian medicine, the man creates the foetus and passes it on to the woman during sex. Evidence for this post-mortem gender transformation can be seen in coffins on which a woman is depicted with red skin (more commonly a male attribute) and on which spells that address the deceased with masculine pronouns are recorded. As well as painted sarcophagi, like the Coffin of the Lady of the House, circa 1292-1190 BC (above), small statuettes are on display, showing the woman returned to her female state after recreating herself for rebirth.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until end 2017.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.



SAN FRANCISCO, California
Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire

The most visited archaeological site in Mexico, the city of Teotihuacan is still yielding fascinating discoveries, such as a previously unknown tunnel beneath the Feathered Serpent Pyramid. Mural fragments such as one depicting a bird with shield and spear, AD 500–50 (above), obsidian blades and finds from new excavations offer a glimpse of life in this vast Mesoamerican cultural, political, economic and religious centre.
de Young, Fine Art Museums of San Francisco
+1 415 750 3600
(deyoung.famsf.org)
Until 11 February 2018.




SAN FRANCISCO, California
Gods in Color: Polychromy in the Ancient World

The familiar white marble of ancient sculpture belies their original appearance, as this touring exhibition, now with new discoveries, shows with its colourfully painted replicas of Classical sculpture, such as the lofty (6ft 7in) plaster Athena (above), copied from an original of 480 BC from Aegina. Traces of paint can here be seen with the naked eye on some Greek and Roman sculpture while, in other cases, advances in technology have allowed researchers to get a fuller picture of ancient polychromy. Alongside the replicas, original statues and reliefs from Egypt, Greece, Rome and the Near East give a comprehensive view of the use of colour in the ancient Mediterranean.
Legion of Honor, Fine Art Museums of San Francisco
+1 415 750 3600
(legionofhonor.famsf.org)
Until 7 January 2018.




WASHINGTON DC
Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice across Asia

Buddhist art from a diverse range of Asian countries has been brought together for this exhibition, which considers how sacred objects and artworks are an integral part of Buddhism. More than 250 remarkable artefacts, including a 14th-century, gilt-copper Buddha from central Tibet (above), are on display. They reveal the power they embody and the relationships between objects, people and ritual. This exhibition also contains two experiential spaces. One is the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room from the Alice S Kandell Collection, in which many objects are displayed as they would be in the shrine of a noble family.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
Until October 2020.



WASHINGTON DC
In the Library: Jost Amman and 16th-Century Woodcut Illustration

The work of Europe's leading printmakers and book illustrators, is examined in this installation which draws together woodcuts by Jost Amman (1539–91), his predecessors, and his contemporaries, such as Heinrich Vogtherr, both the Elder and Younger, whose depictions of helmets (above) were published in 1545. These economical woodcuts commissioned for Bibles, history, ancient texts and literature, combined simplicity with imagination.
National Gallery of Art Library
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
From 5 January 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt

The special status of cats in ancient Egyptian society, religion and politics is explored from the Middle Kingdom to the Byzantine period. On show are feline coffins and statues and amulets oof the cat-headed goddess Bastet.
Freer/Sackler, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
From 14 October 2017 to 15 January 2018.



WASHINGTON DC

Edvard Munch: Colour in Context
From an early age the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) was in contact with spiritualist ideas popular in the late 19th century. He believed he could see energies emanating from certain hues. This exhibition brings together 21 of his prints, including Madonna, 1895 (above), showing how his choice, combination and meaning of colour were informed by spiritualist principles and psychological theories. Most of the works on display are from the Epstein Family Collection, the most significant collection of Munch's works outside Norway.
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
From 3 September 2017 to
28 January 2018.

CHINA


SHEKOU, Shenzhen
Values of Design

Design Society, a new cultural hub in Sea World Culture and Arts Centre, is opening this December with a set of exhibitions. The inaugural exhibition in the V&A Gallery draws on the V&A's own collections to examine the concepts of value and design through more than 250 objects from 31 countries, dating from AD 900 to the present. They explore performance, cost, problem solving, materials, communication and identity. Much of the focus is on 20th- and 21st-century designs, but earlier artefacts, including an Egyptian waterfilter, decorated with a hare, from 900–1200 BC (above) and a late 17th–18th-century Iranian astrolabe, show designers have long been concerned with environmental context and multifunctionality.
Design Society
(www.designsociety.cn)
From 2 December 2017.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
Pharaoh: The Face of Power

During the Middle Kingdom (circa 2000–1800 BC), the pharaoh unified the country and strengthened his position after a period of decline. Portraits were used to transmit the idea of power. Some sculptures show pharaohs (such as Amenemhet III and his predecessor Sesostris III) looking stern and authoritative, while others, like The Black Head of a King (also Amenemhet III) capture a sense of the ruler's powerful personality. Jewellery and amulets are also on view.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.dk)
From 12 October 2017 to
25 February 2018.


COPENHAGEN
French Painting

The story of 150 years of French painting, between 1800 and 1950, is told in masterpieces from the Glyptotek collection that emphasise the inventiveness of art during this period. The exhibition travels backwards through time, featuring work by Manet, Monet, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Degas – including his Jockeys Before the Race, circa 1888 (above) – and other artists active in France. Although the focus is on paintings, drawings and small sculptures also make an appearance, reflecting the different ways in which artists strove for originality.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
Until 31 December 2017.

FRANCE
BOULOGNE-BILLANCOURT
Maria by Callas

Forty years after her death, the great soprano Maria Callas takes centre stage in this exhibition, part of a wider project (including books and a film) investigating her work. Callas starred in many operas on stage and also acted in one role on screen – as Medea in Pasolini's 1969 film. This show offers an insight into the diva's life through private photographs, interviews, Super 8 films, costumes and other objects.
La Seine Musicale
+33 1 74 34 54 00
(www.laseinemusicale.com)
Until 14 December 2017.


LENS
Italian Paintings from Northern France: Dialogues and Connections

This exhibition features some 20 Italian paintings that are held in collections in Picardy and the Nord-Pas-de-Calais exploring connecting links between 16th- to 18th-century artists. Among the highlights is a charming, 16th-century oil on panel showing Charity (above) from the workshop of Francesco Salviati (1510–63). The exhibition in the Lens Glass Pavilion comes at the end of the Heures italiennes series that has been held throughout 2017 in the Hauts-de-France region.
Musée du Louvre-Lens
+33 (0) 32 11 86 321
(www.louvrelens.fr)
From 18 October 2017 to
28 May 2018.

LENS
Music! Echoes of Antiquity
Artefacts from Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome offer an insight into the role music played in their social, political and religious structures. Cylinder seals, vases, papyri and reliefs reflect the functions of music: as a marker of various stages in the life cycle, as part of religious rituals, as intermediary between gods and men, and as an accompaniment to battles and feasts. A painted wood stela, 1069–664 BC (above) shows the blind harpist Djedkhonsuiuefank playing before the god Ra-Horakhty.
Musée du Louvre-Lens
+33 (0) 32 11 86 321
(www.louvrelens.fr)
From 13 September 2017 to 15 January 2018.

MOULINS
Artisans and Craftsmen of the Performing Arts

The exceptional and often unsung skills of those who work backstage are celebrated in 250 costumes, accessories, stage sets, videos, designs and prototypes. Together, they reveal the talent and hard work of costume and jewellery designers, stylists, hairdressers, shoemakers, and wigmakers.
Centre National du Costume de Scene
+33 4 70 20 76 20
(www.cncs.fr)
Until 11 March 2018.



PARIS
Oriental Christians: 2,000 Years of History

Some 300 objects, many loans from religious communities, are on show for the first time in Europe, revealing the diverse experiences of Christians in countries across the Middle East during the past two millennia. As well as telling the religious, social, political and cultural history of these communities, the exhibition also looks to their future. Among the highlights of the show are the Rabbula Gospels, a 6th-century illuminated Syriac manuscript, the earliest known church frescoes from 3rd-century Dura-Europos in Syria, and The Virgin Hodigitria among the Saints, 1650 (above) an icon by Yûsuf al-Musawwir from Aleppo.
Institut du monde arabe
+33 1 40 51 38 38
(www.imarabe.org)
Until 14 January 2018.

PARIS
2017: The Year of France-Colombia

To mark France-Colombia 2017, this display of 18th-century art from the Viceroyalty of New Granada celebrates Colombian cultural heritage. A wooden statue of Saint Barbara, influenced by the Seville school and still an influence on local artists, and the ornate monstrance from the church of San Ignacio in Bogotá make up the display.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 20 September 2017 to 15 January 2018.


PARIS
Drawing in the Open Air: Variations of Drawings from Nature in the First Half of the 19th Century
By the 19th century the ability to draw in the open air became an essential part of an artist's training and was practised by many. A large number of plein air works depict a variety of subjects, including the unfinished View of Frascati (above) by Achille Bénouville (1815–91) from the Louvre's own Department of Prints and Drawings.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 18 October 2017
to 29 January 2018.

STRASBOURG
Laboratory for Europe: Strasbourg, 1880–1930

Between 1880 and 1930, many new ideas and art forms flourished in Strasbourg. There was much urban development, the decorative arts thrived and a world-class university emerged. This exhibition, which is a collaboration between the University of Strasbourg and Strasbourg Museums, celebrates this city's role in European arts and science and shows how its institutions acquired their important collections. Satellite exhibitions at Strasbourg's other museums explore the city's contribution to other fields such as zoology and music.
Musée d'Art moderne et contemporain de Strasbourg
+33 3 68 98 51 55
(www.musees.strasbourg.eu/musee-d-art-moderne-et-contemporain)
Until 25 February 2018.


ITALY
VENICE
Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable

For the first time, the two venues of the Pinault Collection in Venice (Palazzo Grasso and Punta della Dogana) are devoted to the work of a single artist – Damien Hirst. In this ambitious, sprawling and bizarre exhibition, the artist not only imagined the precious artefacts on board a fictional ancient wreck, named the Unbelievable, he had them constructed, deposited them on the seabed for 10 years and then recovered them. Now, the head of Medusa (above), a statue of Proteus, a sphinx and the skull of a Cyclops feature in an exhibition that turns art and archaeology on its head.
Palazzo Grassi and
Punta della Dogana
+39 041 2401 308
(www.palazzograssi.it)
Until 3 December 2017.

PUERTO RICO
PONCE
Frederic Leighton and the Eternal Mediterranean

A variety of works on loan from Leighton House Museum chart the career of the leading Victorian artist and President of the Royal Academy. This is the first exhibition in America devoted to Fredreric, Lord Leighton (1830–96) and it highlights the importance of the Mediterranean and his travels in his life and work.
Museo de Arte de Ponce
+1 787 840 1510
(www.museoarteponce.org)
Until 15 January 2018.

SPAIN
MADRID
Picasso/Lautrec

Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) never met Picasso (1881–1973) but the younger artist felt the impact of his predecessor's radical work and his interest in the relationship between art and advertising, and in high and low society. A selection of 100 works by both artists have been brought together for a comparative study, centring around caricature portraits, brothels, café night-life, cabarets and theatres, the circus and those who live on the margins of society.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until to 21 January 2018.

SWITZERLAND
LAUSANNE
Ai Weiwei: It's always the others

More than 30 works by Ai Weiwei, from 1995 to the present day, can be found around the museums of the Palais de Rumine. In the Zoology Museum, for example, a 50 metre-long dragon hangs high above visitors' heads. The artist makes use of a variety of media – porcelain, silk, wood, marble, jade, bamboo, aluminium, wallpaper, photography, videos and also 10 tonnes of hand-painted porcelain seeds – showcasing his extraordinary versatility and his relationship with traditional Chinese and other materials.
Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts
+41 21 316 34 45
(www.mcba.ch)
Until 28 January 2018.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM


LONDON
ROME MMXVII

The Royal Shakespeare Company's ROME MMXVII season brings Rome – as Shakespeare imagined it – to the Barbican with productions of four of his plays: Coriolanus (above)(6–18 November), Julius Caesar (24 November–20 January 2018), Titus Andronicus (7 December–19 January 2018) and Antony and Cleopatra
(30 November–20 January 2018).
Barbican
6 November–20 January 2018
(barbican.org.uk)

An Introduction to Virgil's Aeneid in translation: a two-day study course
Virgil's great Latin epic, the Aeneid¸ charts the escape of the Trojan hero Aeneas from his fallen home city and his voyage to establish a new city in Italy. Using Robert Fagle's translation (Penguin, 2006), this two-day course serves as an introduction to this great epic poem. The course costs £75. To book, contact Isabel Raphael before 17 November.
The Stonemasons Arms
6–7 December
(isabelraphael16@gmail.com)

OXFORD
Michael Wood: Travelling and Filming in Gandhara

Historian and broadcaster Michael Wood will share his experiences of Gandhara over 30 years in the 2017 Gandhara Connections public lecture. Gandhara Connections is a multidisciplinary project set up by the University of Oxford's Classical Art Research Centre (CARC) focusing on the art of the ancient region and its links to Classical Greece and Rome. Places are free but should be booked in advance (contact carc@classics.ox.ac.uk).
23 November, 5pm
Wolfson College,
University of Oxford
(www.carc.ox.ac.uk/events)

VARIOUS LOCATIONS
Antigone

This lively adaptation of Sophocles' Antigone (below) by Actors of Dionysus is sets in a dystopian landscape, with flocks of drones in the sky and Fate written in code.
Mumford Theatre, Cambridge
1 November
Cranbrook School, Cranbrook, Kent
2 November
Theatre Royal, Margate
3 November
Brewhouse, Burton on Trent
7 November
Malvern Theatre, Great Malvern
8 November
Edge Hill University, Ormskirk
9 November
Lakeside Theatre, Nottingham
13 November
Charter Theatre, Preston
14 & 15 November
The Macready Theatre, Rugby School
16 November
Gresham's School, Holt
17 November
Theatre Royal, Winchester
20 November
Roedean School, Brighton
21 November
Gulbenkian, Canterbury
27 November
(www.actorsofdionysus.com)

 

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