Events


UNITED KINGDOM
BATH
Seurat to Riley: The Art of Perception

Perception is a key to most art, and it has been a subject of intense interest among many practitioners. In the late 19th century Pointillists, such as Georges Seurat, were preoccupied with scientific colour theories. In the 20th century it was the perception and depiction of movement that was on the minds of Vorticists, Op Artists and Kinetic Artists, like Victor Vasarely, Bridget Riley, Jeffrey Steele and Peter Sedgley– some of whom are still working today. The colourful work of contemporary artists, such as Jim Lambie and ceramicist Sara Moorhouse, are also featured in this exhibition.
Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388 569
(www.holburne.org)
Until 21 January 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Currencies of Conflict: Siege and Emergency Money from Antiquity to WWII

Many conflicts across the world and throughout history have involved sieges in which the people with no access to the outside have had to produce emergency currency in the form of coins or paper money. Examples of this fascinating emergency currency, dating from Ancient Greece to the Second World War, are on show and tell the little-known story of its invention and use.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0) 1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 23 February 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Sampled Lives: Samplers from the Fitzwilliam Museum

More than 100 embroidered and stitched samplers offer a rare glimpse into the lives of ordinary young women in the past. The pieces, whose makers range in date from mid-17th-century English Quakers to early 20th-century school pupils, give an insight into education, employment, family, status and needlework skills.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 8 April 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Another India: Explorations and Expressions of Indigenous South Asia

Marking the 70th anniversary of India's independence from Britain and the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, this exhibition presents more than 100 artefacts, paintings and photographs from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology collections (some on show for the first time) along with work by contemporary artists in an exploration of the diverse minority populations of India. Together, the pieces on display tell the story of colonialism, British involvement in the subcontinent, and collecting.
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
+44 (0)1223 333516
(maa.cam.ac.uk)
Until 22 April 2018.


DERBY
Marion Adnams: A Singular Woman

Born in 1898 in Derby, where she spent most of her long life, Marion Adnams was an art teacher who painted in a distinctive, Surrealistic style. Her art was informed by her interest in the natural world, particularly the Derbyshire landscape and White Peak. Now Adnams' home town is staging the first exhibition in decades devoted to the artist, who died in 1998, including drawings, prints, personal objects and paintings, such as For Lo, Winter is Past, from 1963 (above).
Derby Museum and Art Gallery
+44 (0)1332 641901
(www.derbymuseums.org)
Until 4 March 2018.

EDINBURGH
A New Era: Scottish Modern Art 1900–1950

The traditional view of modern Scottish art is that it was dominated by the Scottish Colourists of the 1920s and 1930s, heavily influenced by French artists. By putting progressive works by leading artists and their lesser-known counterparts in the spotlight, this show challenges previous thinking. More than 80 works by 50 artists reveal Scotland's contributions to Expressionism, Surrealism, Fauvism, Cubism and Abstraction.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 10 June 2018.


EDINBURGH
Splendours of the Subcontinent: A Prince's Tour of India 1875–6

As part of the 2017 UK-India Year of Culture, gifts presented to Edward, Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII, on his 1875–76 tour of India, Sri Lanka and Nepal are on show. It is the first time the gifts – exquisite examples of Indian craftsmanship, including gold and silverware, ceremonial arms and jewellery such as the sirpech (turban ornament) presented by Sajjan Singh, Maharaja of Udaipur (above) – have been displayed together since the late 19th century. Watercolours and photographs help to tell the story of the royal visit.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 15 December to
15 April 2018.


EDINBURGH
Constable and McTaggart

John Constable's impact on Scottish landscape painter William McTaggart (1835–1910) is examined in this display, which includes Constable's monumental Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows, 1831 (above) and McTaggart's The Storm, 1890. McTaggart saw Constable's paintings a number of times during the 19th century, but his style changed in the 1880s when 118 works by Constable were on display in Edinburgh. Constable's influence can be seen in The Storm – in the scale of the painting, the depiction of the approaching storm, and in the use of a variety of brush strokes.
Scottish National Gallery
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 25 March 2018.

LIVERPOOL
John Piper

Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral was consecrated 50 years ago and this exhibition marks the occasion by honouring British artist John Piper (1903–92), who designed many of its stained-glass windows, including the centrepiece of the cathedral. More than 40 of his works, particularly painting and collages, chart Piper's career, his relationship with major international artists, such as Jean Arp and Georges Braque, and his influence on British art from the 1930s. His work shows a fondness for his native landscapes and an understanding of earlier art forms, such as Anglo-Saxon carving and medieval stained-glass windows.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 17 November to 18 March 2018.

LIVERPOOL
Surrealism in Egypt: Art et Liberté 1938–1948
Surrealist art in Egypt, produced by a collective of artists and writers in Cairo, has often been overlooked, but it is a distinct episode in the story of the movement. The majority of this material – comprising more than 100 paintings, photographs, film and archival documents – has not been seen before in the UK, and it reveals the socio-political motivations that drove the Art et Liberté group. They published their manifesto Long Live Degenerate Art in 1938, in response to the local rise of fascism and, in the following decade, young intellectuals eager for reform created a variety of work. Themes explored include womens issues and police brutality.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 17 November to 18 March 2018.


LONDON
On violence and beauty: reflections on war

A selection of objects, ancient and modern, lets us consider the relationship between conflict and art in the British Museum's new Asahi Shimbun Display. The oldest object, an Ancient Egyptian battlefield palette from circa 3300–3100 BC, captures a general wish to conquer both chaos and the enemy. An Assyrian relief shows a battle with the Elamite army, and a 6th-century BC Greek amphora depicts the death of the Amazon queen Penthesilea at the hands of Achilles (above). These ancient representations, with their focus on heroism and conquest, contrast with a video installation by Iranian artist Farideh Lashai (1944–2013), who takes a fresh approach to The Disasters of War, Goya's series of 82 prints, made from 1810 to 1820.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8181
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 21 January 2018.

LONDON
Living with gods

Beliefs from across the globe are brought together in this exhibition, which was the subject of the recent BBC Radio 4 series by the museum's former director, Neil Macgregor. A wide range of objects chart practices across faiths in a number of themes, such as pilgrimage, co-existence and conflict, and public celebrations. Among the many highlights are the Lion Man (above) from Baden-Württemberg, Germany, a hybrid creature from 40,000 BC, the end of the last Ice Age. Other artefacts include: a miniature prayer-book that may have belonged to Queen Elizabeth I; a Tibetan New Year dance mask; and Soviet scientific atheist posters.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8181
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 8 April 2018.

LONDON
Lake Keitele: A Vision of Finland

The first UK exhibition on Finnish artist Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865–1931) focuses on his exquisite 1905 work Lake Keitele (above right), which was acquired by the National Gallery in 1999. All four versions of this subject are shown in chronological order which reveals the artist's progress from a naturalistic landscape to a more abstract painting. Also on show are his earlier landscapes and a stained-glass piece of a lakeshore view, showing the continued importance of Finland's natural environment to the artist who helped to define the country's national identity.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 4 February 2018.


LONDON
Cézanne Portraits
Some of the nearly 200 portraits painted by Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) are on display here revealing a chronological development in his style and method, and his ideas about identity. The works include examples of Cézanne's characteristic complementary pairs and multiple versions of the same subject. Self-portraits, portraits of his wife Hortense Fiquet, his uncle Dominique Aubert, and his gardener and his odd-job man, Vallier, are brought together and used to examine the influence of particular sitters over the artist's portraiture. His Self-Portrait, oil on canvas dating from circa 1885, is shown above.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0) 20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
Until 11 February 2018.


LONDON
Charles I: King and Collector

Charles I was one of the great art collectors and patrons of his day. After his execution in 1649, his acquisitions of works by Titian, Dürer, Mantegna and Holbein, and contemporary commissions by Rubens, Van Dyck (whose 1635 Triple Portrait of the king is shown below) and others, were sold. His son, Charles II, recovered many pieces during the Restoration, but others remained scattered across Europe. More than 100 works, including Classical sculptures, tapestries and miniatures, as well as studio paintings, are at last reunited and their impact on England's visual culture is explored.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 27 January to 15 April 2018.


LONDON
All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life

Focusing on the visceral work of Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, this exhibition examines how artists in the 20th century have responded to the challenge of capturing their personal experiences of life in paint, imbuing their creations with both sensuality and intimacy – Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud, 1964 (above) by his friend Bacon, is one example. Figurative paintings by other artists, such as Stanley Spencer, Walter Sickert, Frank Auerbach and RB Kitaj, are also on show and connections are made with different generations of artists. Women artists and their role in an world of male-dominated figurative painting are put in the spotlight in works by Paula Rego, Cecily Brown, Celia Paul, Jenny Saville and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 28 February to 27 August 2018.


LONDON
Ocean Liners: Speed & Style

The glitz and glamour of the golden age of ocean travel are recreated in this exhibition, which explores all aspects of design of some of the most luxurious vessels of the 19th and 20th centuries, and considers the wider cultural impact and lasting appeal of ocean liners. More than 100 years of high-end engineering, architecture, interior design, onboard lifestyle and fashion are set out, from Brunel's 1859 Atlantic steamship The Great Eastern to the 1969 launch of the QE2. With more than 250 artefacts, including paintings, ship models, furniture, and posters on show the highlights include: Art Deco interiors, such as a stylish panel from The Rape of Europa, 1934, by Jean Dupas (above) that once adorned the Normandie, which was launched in 1935. Also displayed are Lady Marguerite Allen's pearl and diamond Cartier tiara, saved from the sinking Lusitania when it was torpedoed in 1915 (Lady Allen survived); and a panel fragment from the first-class lounge of that most iconic of ill-fated ships, the Titanic.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 3 February until
10 June 2018.


LONDON
Ayurvedic Man: Encounters with Indian Medicine

Inspired by an 18th-century Nepalese painting of male anatomy made according to classical Ayurveda, this exhibition looks at this long-practised system of medicine. Newly discovered letters from Henry Wellcome's archive are on show alongside manuscripts, paintings and artefacts, such as animal-shaped surgical tools. The exhibits reveal the relationship between colonial and indigenous medicine, the use of plants in healing, and the role of gender in Indian medicine, visualised in a 19th-century watercolour entitled Woman swinging below an aubergine plant (above).
The Wellcome Collection
+44 (0)20 7611 2222
(wellcomecollection.org)
Until 8 April 2018.


LONDON

Monochrome: Painting in Black and White
This exhibition sets out to show that, in art, colour is a choice, not a necessity. More than 50 painted works on glass, vellum, wood, ceramic, silk and canvas produced over a span of seven centuries introduce different aspects of painting in black, white and grey or grisaille, the grey shading often used to imitate sculpture, as in the oil painting by Ingres, Odalisque in Grisaille, circa 1824–34 (above). Pieces range from medieval stained glass to Olafur Eilasson's light installation. The work of Dürer, Rembrandt and other masters is shown with that of contemporary artists, such as Gerhard Richter, Bridget Riley and Chuck Close.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 18 February 2018.



LONDON
Reflections: Van Eyck and the Pre-Raphaelites

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood admired Jan van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait of 1434, acquired by the National Gallery in 1842, and the painting shaped their views on draughtsmanship, colour, technique and the symbolic meanings of objects. Now, for the first time, this 15th-century masterpiece will be shown alongside works that it inspired by Rossetti, Holman Hunt, Millais and others. Their representation of domestic scenes and the use of convex mirrors to depict real and illusory spaces, as in The Bath of Venus, 1898–1904, by Charles Haslewood Shannon (above), were all influenced by Van Eyck.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 2 April 2018.



LONDON
Charles II: Art & Power

After years of puritanical rule under Cromwell, the Restoration in 1660, brought renewed interest in the arts in England. King Charles II was a great patron of the arts, but the works he acquired not only served to adorn the royal apartments, but also reinforced his position and glorified the monarchy. Fine portraits, Old Master paintings, such as Orazio Gentileschi's A Sibyl, circa 1635–38 (above), tapestries, furniture and silver-gilt objects reveal how all the arts served to enhance the king's image.
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 8 December to 13 May 2018.



LONDON
From Life

Both life drawing and drawing from Classical and Renaissance sculpture used to play an important part in an artist's training, as can be seen in Thomas Rowlandson's Drawing from Life at the Royal Academy, 1808 (above). From Life surveys these practices – from the earliest days of the Royal Academy to today, with a range of media by contemporary artists experimenting with new technologies.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 11 December to 11 March 2018.



LONDON
The EY Exhibition: Impressionists in London, French Artists in Exile (1870–1904)

During the Franco-Prussian War, some of the great French artists of the 19th century sought refuge in Britain. Here, they were interested in differences in social life: in parks, for example (walking on the grass was prohibited in formal French gardens), at regattas and in social codes. Monet's and Sisley's Thames riverscapes, Pissarro's suburbian scenes and Tissot's fashionable events, such as The Ball on Shipboard, circa 1874 (above), all show an outsider's view of British society.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 2 November to 7 May 2018.



LONDON
Red Star over Russia: A Revolution in Visual Culture 1905–55

Nina Vatolina's Fascism – The Most Evil Enemy of Women. Everyone to the Struggle Against Fascism, 1941 (above) is among the revolutionary material drawn from the collection of graphic designer David King (1943–2016). Together it provides an exciting visual history of Russia and the Soviet Union – from the overthrow of the last Tsar to the Civil War and the rise of Stalin. This show of dynamic posters, paintings, photographs and books marks the centenary of the October Revolution.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 8 November to
18 February 2018.

LONDON
Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic

As well as providing an insight into the creation of the beloved bear and the interplay between AA Milne's storytelling and EH Shepard's illustrations, this show looks at the lasting popularity of Winnie-the-Pooh. Original drawings and manuscripts are shown alongside a range of items, such as ceramics and clothes, all featuring Winnie-the-Pooh and his companions Christopher Robin, Eeyore, Piglet and Tigger.
Victoria and Albert Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 9 December until
8 April 2018.

LONDON
Drawn in Colour: Degas from the Burrell

Another exhibition commemorating the centenary of Degas' death, this show presents a group of works by the artist from the Burrell Collection in Glasgow alongside others from the National Galley and other collections. Sir William Burrell (1861–1958), a shipping magnate, collected a large number of Degas pastels from throughout his career that illustrate some of the artist's favourite subjects. The Green Ballet Skirt, circa 1896 (above), shows his love of ballet, while pictures of horse-racing and private scenes of women at their toilette also appealed to him. Degas turned to pastel when his eyesight began to fail, and bold colours became important in contemporary art. Most of these pictures have not been seen outside Glasgow since they were brought here in the early 20th century.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 20 September 2017 to
7 May 2018.

LONDON
Egypt Uncovered: Belzoni and the Tomb of Pharaoh Seti I

To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Giovanni Battista Belzoni's discovery of the tomb of Seti I on 17 October 1817, this exhibition tells the story of the extraordinary former circus strongman and Seti I's white alabaster sarcophagus. It charts the sarcophagus' long journey to London, including the party Soane threw to mark the arrival of his prized acquisition.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+ 44 (0) 20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
From 11 October 2017
to 14 April 2018.


LONDON
Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion

The influential Spanish designer Cristóbal Balenciaga (1895–1972) developed some famous shapes in fashion such as the tunic, the sack, the baby doll and the shift dress. After starting up in San Sebastian, he opened his famous fashion-house in Paris 80 years ago, but the 1950s and 1960s are considered his most creative years and are the focal point of this show. As well as garments and hats by Balenciaga and his followers, X-rays (examining how innovative structures were achieved), sketches, patterns and fabric samples are on view. There are also charming photographs, such as Dovima with Sacha, cloche and suit by Balenciaga, Café des Deux Magots, Paris, 1955, by Richard Avedon (above) to amuse. Mainly drawn from the V&A's own Balenciaga collection begun by Cecil Beaton in the 1970s, the clothes on show bear witness to a versatile designer who could create everything from ballgowns to gardening shorts for a high-profile, exclusive clientele.
Victoria & Albert Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 18 February 2018.

MANCHESTER
The Reformation

Marking the 500th anniversary of a truly world-changing event, this exhibition explores the role of printing in the turbulent times surrounding the Reformation. In October 1517, Martin Luther questioned the Catholic Church, sharing his thoughts far and wide in print. The early printed material on display shows the impact of this German monk's words, leading to William Tyndale's influential English translation of the Bible in 1526 and Henry VIII's radical religious changes in England.
The John Rylands Library
+44 (0)161 306 0555
(www.library.manchester.ac.uk/rylands/whats-on/events)
Until 4 March 2018.

OXFORD
Designing English

The Bodleian Library holds a spectacular array of medieval manuscripts in English, and a selection of them are on show, along with inscriptions, to provide an in-depth study of graphic design in the first millennium of the English language. Picture books, magnificent illuminations framed with gold, and new page designed for specific tasks, such as handling swans, are featured. Other treasures include the exquisite 9th-century Alfred Jewel (above), made as the handle of an aestel, a pointing device used as a reading aid, and explore how it was designed, created and employed.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until 22 April 2018.

OXFORD
Bodleian Treasures: 21 pairs and a Tropical Forest

This selection of highlights from 12 million items in the Bodleian's extensive collections reveals some renowned rarities alongside less familiar treasures. Among them are: Shakespeare's First Folio, Handel's Messiah, William Blake's Marriage of Heaven and Hell and the illustrated Sanskrit religious text Shikshapatri.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 287400
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until 11 February 2018.

UNITED STATES
BOSTON, Massachusetts
Mark Rothko: Reflection

Mark Rothko (1903–70) is well-known for his vast canvases and considered use of colour. He expressed his persisting belief that art should be experienced rather than merely viewed, and this exhibition sets out to give visitors the opportunity to do just that, to experience the immenseness of his iconic large-scale work. The entire span of Rothko's career is represented, starting with his early Surrealist works. The show also explores his admiration for the Old Masters and the long-held tradition that artists continually refer to the past. This is exemplified by the juxtaposition of two portraits of artists, Rothko's Thru the Window, 1938–39, and Rembrandt's Artist
in his Studio, circa 1628.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 1 July 2018.


CHICAGO, Illinois
Ancient Mediterranean Cultures in Contact

A rich display of nearly 100 ancient Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan and Roman objects from the Field Museum's own collections sheds light on the interactions and exchanges between Mediterranean cultures. Although occupied by Greeks and Romans, Egypt held on to many of its long-standing customs, such as its burial rituals, and even exported its religious ideas and practices. Among the highlights are: Etruscan gold jewellery; a tetradrachm of Alexander the Great's general Ptolemy I demonstrating the use of Greek currency in Egypt; a falcon amulet associated with Horus (above) and a bronze bathtub from Boscoreale, a villa near Pompeii, which hints at the ownership of slaves from distant, conquered lands by a wealthy elite.
Field Museum
+1 312 922 9410
(www.fieldmuseum.org)
Until 29 April 2017.

LOS ANGELES, California
Giovanni Bellini: Landscapes of Faith in Renaissance Venice

Celebrated for his religious scenes, mythological compositions, and portraits, the Venetian artist Giovanni Bellini (circa 1435–1516) was also able to capture exquisite landscapes in paint. Twelve of his paintings and one drawing show how one of the most illustrious artists of the Italian Renaissance set his religious subjects against powerful backdrops of the natural world. Bellini painted religious compositions from the start of his career, beginning with small pieces for private devotion and moving on to altarpieces. One of his earliest surviving works, Saint Jerome in the Wilderness, circa 1455, places the saint and lion in a cave in the foreground, but the scenery in the background is akin to the Venetian mainland (a familiar feature in Bellini's work), rather than the Syrian desert. Later in his career, Bellini worked on sacred allegories. One of these, The Sacred Allegory (above), dating from circa 1500–04, is a complex and mysterious scene depicting what may be the Christ child, the Tree of Life and the Virgin Mary in an unusual landscape.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 14 January 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
Finding Form

Artists employ different techniques and media – white chalk highlights, hatched ink lines and differences in the density of wash – when trying to recreate the three-dimensional world on paper, a two-dimensional surface. Thus, form and depth can be achieved, as in Saint John the Baptist, circa 1500, in red chalk, by Giovanni Agostino da Lodi (above). This show has work from the 16th to the 19th centuries, that use these techniques.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 11 February 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Provocations: Anselm Kiefer at The Met Breuer

While still a student at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Karlsruhe in 1969, the highly successful German artist Anselm Kiefer (born 1945) took photographs of himself in his father's Wehrmacht uniform doing the illegal Nazi salute at historic monuments. This was because the artist found the silence about Germany's past unbearable. These images, some of which he selected for a photo essay six years later, outraged the public. With one painting and 34 works on paper that span Kiefer's career and are all from the Met's own collection, this exhibition shows the artist has not ceased to provoke and continues to examine and confront our conflicted past, time and existence, working with old photographs and using new materials such as lead, hay and earth.
The Met Breuer
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 8 April 2018.


NEW YORK, New York
Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer

Real and mythical animals adorn a large number of luxury objects from late Imperial China. This exhibition takes a close look at Chinese decorative art, focusing on creatures that appear in silk and lacquer between the 13th and the 18th centuries. Dragons, unicorns, phoenixes, butterflies, lions and oxen all appear on robes, rank badges, tapestry panels used for decorating interiors, and an array of lacquer vessels produced by imperial workshops, including a fine Ming dynasty red lacquer box (above).
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 22 July 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer
Dubbed Il Divino (The Divine One) by his contemporaries because of his extraordinary, wide-ranging artistic abilities – in drawing, design, sculpture, painting and architecture, Michelangelo Buonarroti is one of the most esteemed Renaissance artists. This show brings together drawings, sculpture, his earliest painting and a wooden architectural model to show why Michelangelo earned such a lofty epithet.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 13 November to
12 February 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Modigliani Unmasked

Early drawings by Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920) collected by his friend and first patron Paul Alexandre are on display (many for the first time in the US) in this exploration of how the artist's heritage as an Italian Sephardic Jew has influenced his work. Modigliani arrived in Paris in 1906 at a time when anti-Semitism was rife in the city. His drawings, paintings and sculptures respond to the social issues of the era, multiculturalism, and thoughts on identity.
The Jewish Museum
+1 212 423 3200
(thejewishmuseum.org)
From 15 September 2017 to
4 February 2018.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.



SAN FRANCISCO, California
Teotihuacan: City of Water, City of Fire

The most visited archaeological site in Mexico, the city of Teotihuacan is still yielding fascinating discoveries, such as a previously unknown tunnel beneath the Feathered Serpent Pyramid. Mural fragments such as one depicting a bird with shield and spear, AD 500–50 (above), obsidian blades and finds from new excavations offer a glimpse of life in this vast Mesoamerican cultural, political, economic and religious centre.
de Young, Fine Art Museums of San Francisco
+1 415 750 3600
(deyoung.famsf.org)
Until 11 February 2018.

VERO BEACH, Florida
Grayson Perry: Making Meaning

A new curatorial partnership between the Royal Academy of Arts and The Gallery at Windsor will see the Florida venue stage shows by three Royal Academicians over the next three years. First off is Grayson Perry, with his bold take on subjects such as identity, Britishness, craftsmanship and the art establishment through ceramics, sculpture, etchings and tapestries, including the 8m-long Comfort Blanket, 2014.
The Gallery at Windsor
+1 772 388 4071
(www.windsorflorida.com)
From 15 January to 27 April 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
Heavenly Earth: Images of Saint Francis at La Verna

In September 1224, Francis of Assisi spent 40 days fasting and praying in the wilderness of La Verna, Tuscany, in order to share in Christ's suffering. As the story goes, a seraph in the form of a crucified man appeared and left Francis imprinted with Christ's wounds until the end of his life two years later. The stigmatisation of St Francis is the first recorded incident of this kind in the Christian tradition. It was an important moment for monasticism (La Verna is an active monastery to this day) and this exhibition looks at images of St Francis, in print and paint, from the late 15th to mid-18th centuries. These include a German woodcut (above) from circa 1500–10, showing St Francis receiving the stigmata,
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
From 25 February to 8 July 2018.



WASHINGTON DC
Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice across Asia

Buddhist art from a diverse range of Asian countries has been brought together for this exhibition, which considers how sacred objects and artworks are an integral part of Buddhism. More than 250 remarkable artefacts, including a 14th-century, gilt-copper Buddha from central Tibet (above), are on display. They reveal the power they embody and the relationships between objects, people and ritual. This exhibition also contains two experiential spaces. One is the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room from the Alice S Kandell Collection, in which many objects are displayed as they would be in the shrine of a noble family.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
Until October 2020.

AUSTRALIA
SYDNEY
Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Medium

The ever-stylish work of the celebrated photographer Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–89) covers a wide range of subjects. Over 200 of the images he captured in his pursuit of 'perfection in form' are in this comprehensive survey of his career. Mapplethorpe's floral still lifes, erotic images from New York's gay scene and portraits of cultural figures of the 1970s and 1980s, such as Patti Smith, Debbie Harry, Philip Glass, Isabella Rossellini and Louise Bourgeois, made him a celebrity in his own right.
Art Gallery of New South Wales
+61 1800 679 278
(www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au)
Until 4 March 2018.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
Pharaoh: The Face of Power

During the Middle Kingdom (circa 2000–1800 BC), the pharaoh unified the country and strengthened his position after a period of decline. Portraits were used to transmit the idea of power. Some sculptures show pharaohs (such as Amenemhet III and his predecessor Sesostris III) looking stern and authoritative, while others, like The Black Head of a King (also Amenemhet III) capture a sense of the ruler's powerful personality. Jewellery and amulets are also on view.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.dk)
From 12 October 2017 to
25 February 2018.

FRANCE


LENS
Italian Paintings from Northern France: Dialogues and Connections

This exhibition features some 20 Italian paintings that are held in collections in Picardy and the Nord-Pas-de-Calais exploring connecting links between 16th- to 18th-century artists. Among the highlights is a charming, 16th-century oil on panel showing Charity (above) from the workshop of Francesco Salviati (1510–63). The exhibition in the Lens Glass Pavilion comes at the end of the Heures italiennes series that has been held throughout 2017 in the Hauts-de-France region.
Musée du Louvre-Lens
+33 (0) 32 11 86 321
(www.louvrelens.fr)
From 18 October 2017 to
28 May 2018.

MOULINS
Artisans and Craftsmen of the Performing Arts

The exceptional and often unsung skills of those who work backstage are celebrated in 250 costumes, accessories, stage sets, videos, designs and prototypes. Together, they reveal the talent and hard work of costume and jewellery designers, stylists, hairdressers, shoemakers, and wigmakers.
Centre National du Costume de Scene
+33 4 70 20 76 20
(www.cncs.fr)
Until 11 March 2018.

PARIS
Burmese Images: Photographic Treasures of the MNAAG

A vast collection of historic photographs of Burma in the late 19th-century document the stunning landscapes and impressive monuments (some of the 19th-century wooden monuments are no longer standing) of this former British colony, as seen through the eyes of European photographers including J Jackson, Felice Beato, and Philip Adolph Klier. There are also images showing scenes of daily life, dancers and aristocratic women.
Musée national des arts asiatiques – Guimet
+33 1 56 52 54 33
(www.guimet.fr)
Until 22 January 2018.

PARIS
Before the Incas: Gods and Kings in Ancient Peru

The Inca is perhaps the best-known pre-Columbian civilisation, but this exhibition casts a light on its less well-known predecessors – the Cupisnique, Moche, Chimú and Lambayeque of northern Peru. Featuring ceramics, jewellery in gold and silver, leatherwork, grave goods, and more, some 300 works reveal the richness of these pre-Inca cultures and their influence on the societies that followed.
Musée du quai Branly–Jacques Chirac
+33 1 56 61 70 0
(www.quaibranly.fr)
Until 1 April 2018.

STRASBOURG
Laboratory for Europe: Strasbourg, 1880–1930

Between 1880 and 1930, many new ideas and art forms flourished in Strasbourg. There was much urban development, the decorative arts thrived and a world-class university emerged. This exhibition, which is a collaboration between the University of Strasbourg and Strasbourg Museums, celebrates this city's role in European arts and science and shows how its institutions acquired their important collections. Satellite exhibitions at Strasbourg's other museums explore the city's contribution to other fields such as zoology and music.
Musée d'Art moderne et contemporain de Strasbourg
+33 3 68 98 51 55
(www.musees.strasbourg.eu/musee-d-art-moderne-et-contemporain)
Until 25 February 2018.

INDIA
MUMBAI
India and the World: A History in Nine Stories

As part of UK/India 2017, a year of cultural exchanges that celebrated 70 years of Indian Independence, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS), Mumbai and the National Museum, Delhi, teamed up with the British Museum to launch an exhibition of art and artefacts from India and abroad that highlight the country's important place in the history of the world. Prehistoric hand-axes, coins from early empires, religious art, and more, tell a long and fascinating story that stretches to the present day and will continue into the future.
Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS)
+91 22 2284 4484
(www.csmvs.in)
Until 18 February 2018.

SPAIN
BILBAO
David Hockney: 82 portraits and 1 still-life

Recent works by David Hockney offer an intimate glimpse of his life in Los Angeles. Organised with the Royal Academy of Arts, where the show first ran in 2016, this exhibition features portraits of friends, family and fellow artists. The portraits are all the same size, painted in three days, and feature the same chair and blue background. This allows Hockney's skill in capturing the personality of each sitter to shine through. The blue background is also used in the solitary still life.Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 25 February 2018.


MADRID
César Paternosto: Towards Painting as Object

Curated by the Argentinian contemporary artist César Paternosto (b 1931), this exhibition explores how artists have approached painting as object, rather than just representation., since the beginning of the 20th century. Paternosto's own works, such as Red Trio, 2015 (above), offering the current take on this are displayed alongside paintings by some of the great 20th-century artists, such as Picasso, Mondrian, and Juan Gris, who inspired this exhibition.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 28 January 2018.

SWITZERLAND
LAUSANNE
Ai Weiwei: It's Always the Others

More than 30 works from 1995 to the present day created by Ai Weiwei can be found not just in the Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts but all around the museums of the Palais de Rumine. In the Zoology Museum, for example, a 50-metre long dragon hangs high above visitors' heads. This and other works make use of a variety of media including porcelain, wood, marble, jade, bamboo, silk, aluminium, wallpaper, photographs and videos, confirming the artist's extraordinary versatility as well as his familiarity with traditional Chinese materials. One of the highlights is Sunflower Seeds – an installation of 10 tonnes of hand-painted porcelain seeds.
Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts
+41 21 316 34 45
(www.mcba.ch)
Until 28 January 2018.


ZURICH
Nasca, Peru: Searching for Traces in the Desert

The Nazca Desert in southern Peru is home to many enormous geoglyphs, up to 370 metres in length and known as the Nazca Lines. Archaeologists believe they were created by the Nazca culture between circa 200 BC and circa AD 650. But who were these ancient people? An extraordinary array of around 200 artefacts, some from recent excavations and all from Peruvian collections, offers a comprehensive look at Nazca culture. Ceramic vessels in the form of hybrid creatures, such as a painted bottle in the shape of an orca (above), colourful textiles, found in graves, and gold masks all shed light on the daily life of the Nazca, their gods and the rituals associated with the Nazca Lines.
Museum Rietberg
+41 (0)44 415 31 31
(www.rietberg.ch)
Until 15 April 2018.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
LONDON
Medieval Seminar Series 2017–2018
UCL Institute of Archaeology and British Museum

Norwich Castle Keep: A 12th-Century Building Reinterpreted for the
21st Century
Tim Pestell
23 January

Current work on the Anglo-Saxon monastery of Lindisfarne
David Petts
20 February

Discovering the Northern Picts: Kingship and Society in Northeast Scotland circa AD 300–1000
Gordon Noble
20 March
Seminars are held at 6pm in Room 612
UCL Institute of Archaeology
(www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology)

NETHERLANDS
MAASTRICHT
TEFAF Maastricht

Presenting 7000 years of art history, dealers and experts in ancient art, design, paintings, works on paper, tribal art and more, will be taking part in the 31st edition of this leading art and antiques fair. Among those offering antiquities are Cahn International AG, Charles Ede, Galerie Harmakhis and Rupert Wace Ancient Art. This year, TEFAF Maastricht's loan exhibition will showcase the Amsterdam Museum's newly restored The Headmen of the Longbow Civic Guard House (1653) by Bartholomeus van der Helst, alongside examples of 16th-century silverware depicted in the painting. Five more recently restored Golden Age group portraits will also be displayed, including two by Ferdinand Bol.
MECC
10–18 March
(www.tefaf.com)

RUSSIA
MOSCOW
Russian Art & Antique Fair

Russia's only antiques fair returns for its 44th year with more than 250 galleries – from Russia, Germany, Italy, the United States and France – participating. Traditionally they exhibit Russian art, furniture and graphic design but, now, ancient art, numismatics, carpets, antiquarian books, photographs, sculpture and paintings from different periods from a variety of regions will also
be on show.
Central Manege
6–11 February
(www.antiquesalon.ru)



BELGIUM
BRUSSELS
BRAFA

Recent years have seen increasing visitor numbers at one of the world's oldest art and antiques fairs, with more than 61,000 people attending BRAFA in 2017. On 27 January the first major international art fair of the year returns once more with 133 exhibitors from 15 countries taking part. Together, they offer high-quality works from across the globe, dating from antiquity to the present day. With Old Masters, tribal art, drawings by comic-strip artists, contemporary paintings, sculpture, furniture, jewellery, porcelain, glassware and clocks, there is something for all tastes. As ever, antiquities are well-represented and this year there are some new names, such as Sycomore Ancient Art, Ancient Art and Theatrum Mundi. The London-based dealer AncientArt will show: a Macedonian gold stater, minted under King Lysimachos and struck with the portrait of the deified Alexander the Great with a diadem and the horns of Ammon; a 7th-century BC Corinthian helmet; the only surviving shabti for Iweferbaku from the 18th Dynasty of Ancient Egypt. There are a good number returning antiquities dealers, such as J Bagot Arqueología – Ancient Art from Barcelona who will be bringing a Roman 1st–2nd-century AD double herm of Apollo and Dionysos in marble (above) and a Roman 1st-century AD Athena in bronze.
Tour & Taxis
27 January–4 February 2018
(www.brafa.art)

 

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