Events


UNITED KINGDOM

CAMBRIDGE
Flux: Parian Unpacked

In 2016, the Fitzwilliam acquired the David Glynn Collection, more than 300 pieces of 19th-century Parian ware (above), a porcelain invented by the Minton pottery in 1845 to look like marble and named after the Greek island of Paros where white marble is found. These pieces depict literary figures, kings and queens, notable people from British history, and characters from mythology. More than 100 busts are displayed, curated by ceramic artist Matt Smith, who delves into questions of our notion of history and its constant state of flux, celebrity and colonialism. New Parian works by Smith throughout the galleries bring these themes to mind when contemplating the permanent collections.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0) 1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 6 March to 1 July 2018.

CAMBRIDGE
Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery

Charting nearly a century of British potters' innovative work using traditional ceramic forms, this show looks at the evolution of specific types of vessel in British studio pottery. Organised with the Yale Center of British Art, where it was first displayed, the show features more than 100 historic and contemporary ceramics by celebrated artists such as Lucie Rie, Edmund de Waal, Grayson Perry and Clare Twomey, whose work Made in China – a sprawling set of 80 vast porcelain vases, highlighting the difference in labour conditions in different regions – will be installed around the museum.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0) 1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 20 March to 17 June 2018.

COMPTON VERNEY, Warwickshire
Created in Conflict: British Soldier Art from the Crimean War to Today
Commemorating 100 years since the end of the First World War, this display of artworks created by soldiers since the 19th century, has been brought together to provide a personal insight into the lives of those who have served in combat. Art was a way in which soldiers could keep in touch with home, or it could be used as propaganda. Together, the exhibits reflect the resourcefulness and great diversity of experience during times of war.
Compton Verney
+44 (0)1926 645 500
(www.comptonverney.org.uk)
Until 10 June 2018.


COMPTON VERNEY, Warwickshire
Ravilious and Co: The Pattern of Friendship
Eric Ravilious (1903–42) was at the heart of one of the most important circles of innovative English artists and designers of the mid-20th century. His designs for wallpapers, textiles and ceramics are displayed alongside his familiar landscapes , especially of the South Downs, and war paintings in an exhibition which charts his relationships and collaborations with fellow artists, such as Paul Nash (who influenced his work as a wood engraver), John Nash, Enid Marx and Eileen 'Tirzah' Garwood (who became his wife). Ravilious also produced over 400 book illustrations, book jackets and more than 40 lithographic designs. This aspect of his oeuvre is displayed in a mock-up of a 1930s' bookshop, showing books and illustrations, such as The Westbury Horse, 1939 (above). Eric Ravilious was lost in action over Iceland, aged only 39, while working as a war artist.
Compton Verney
+44 (0)1926 645 500
(www.comptonverney.org.uk)
Until 10 June 2018.


DEDHAM, Essex
Munnings and the River

In the 250th anniversary year of the Royal Academy, this exhibition takes a look at a less familiar aspect of the career of one of its presidents – Sir Alfred Munnings. He is best known for his equestrian and sporting scenes but, here, his landscapes are in the spotlight. Rivers provided a backdrop for most of the artist's life, from his childhood home in a watermill to his later residence near the Stour in Dedham, and it is these natural features that flow through his landscape paintings, such as Tagg's Island 1919 (above) on the Thames.
Munnings Museum
+44 (0)1206 322127
(www.munningsmuseum.org.uk)
Until 31 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
Canaletto and the Art of Venice

Over 100 paintings, drawings, and prints by Canaletto (1697–1768) and his contemporaries show how they captured the allure of Venice. Not only did they meticulously record the vibrancy of the city around them, they also developed the capriccio, architectural fantasies conjuring up Classical ruins, which can be seen in Canaletto's A Capriccio View with Ruins, circa 1742–44 (above), Marco Riccis's Caprice View with Roman Ruins, circa 1729, and Landscape with Classical Ruins, Cattle and Figures, circa 1741–42, by Francesco Zuccarelli. All these paintings come from the Royal Collection. They were acquired by George III from Joseph Smith (circa 1674−1770), an English merchant and later British Consul in Venice. The king, a great patron of the arts, bought almost all Smith's collection in 1762, an acquisition that has made the Royal Collection one of the pre-eminent collections of 18th-century Venetian art in the world containing the largest number of works by Canaletto.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 11 May to 21 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
A New Era: Scottish Modern Art 1900–1950

The traditional view of modern Scottish art is that it was dominated by the Scottish Colourists of the 1920s and 1930s, heavily influenced by French artists. By putting progressive works by leading artists and their lesser-known counterparts in the spotlight, this show challenges previous thinking. More than 80 works by 50 artists reveal Scotland's contributions to Expressionism, Surrealism, Fauvism, Cubism and Abstraction.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 10 June 2018.


HOUGHTON HALL, Norfolk
Damien Hirst at Houghton Hall: Colour Space Paintings and Outdoor Sculptures

The home of Britain's first Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole, is now playing host to new works by Damien Hirst. On public view for the first time, in Houghton Hall's historic State Rooms, are 46 paintings from the Colour Space series, a development of the artist's earlier Spot Paintings, the first of which was created in 1986. Hirst's sculpture is on display in the house and gardens, including the Pegasus and unicorn duo of Myth and Legend (above), which was first seen at Chatsworth in 2011.
Houghton Hall
+44 (0)1485 528569
(www.houghtonhall.com)
Until 15 July 2018.

LIVERPOOL
Egon Schiele/Francesca Woodman

Drawings by the early 20th-century Austrian Expressionist artsist Egon Schiele, who died 100 years ago, and photographs by the later American artist Francesca Woodman (1958–81) together demonstrate innovative approaches to capturing movement through dynamic compositions. Both artists created intimate nude portraits and self-portraits with the focus on emotional intensity – Schiele used quick, sharp lines and Woodman used long exposures.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 24 May to 23 September 2018.



LONDON
Charmed lives in Greece: Ghika, Craxton, Leigh Fermor

After meeting at the end of the Second World War, artists Niko Ghika and John Craxton, and writer Patrick Leigh Fermor became firm friends, shaping each other's work and sharing a love of Greece, where they spent much of their lives. Centring on their homes, on Hydra, Crete, Kardamylia and Corfu, this sunny, Mediterranean exhibition shows paintings, photographs, book jackets, personal possessions and letters that bring their friendship and the people and places of Greece to life. Above is John Craxton's 1948 Study for a Poster.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 15 July 2018.


LONDON
Edward Bawden

Throughout his long career, which spanned 60 years, Edward Bawden (1903–89) demonstrated his great versatility and humour as an artist and designer. He also had a flair for storytelling, which can be seen in his linocuts depicting Aesop's Fables, such as The Gnat and the Lion, 1970, (above) and the illustrated books he created for his children. Today, his artistic accomplishments are largely overshadowed by his commercial designs for companies including Fortnum & Mason and Shell. Presenting material from every stage of his career, including unseen pieces from his family's private collection, this exhibition sets out to redress this imbalance with a particular emphasis on his role in reinventing watercolour with Paul Nash and Eric Ravilious, and his work as a war artist between
1940 and 1945.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
From 23 May to 9 September 2018.

LONDON
Tacita Dean: Still Life

Curated by Tacita Dean and featuring some of her own work, this exhibition presents a contemporary artist's view of still life in a range of media, and its importance in the history of art. The paintings come from the National Gallery's own collections, which serve as a source of inspiration for artists. Paintings such as Zurbarán's Cup of Water and a Rose are shown alongside works by contemporary artists such as Wolfgang Tillmans and Roni Horn. Dean has also made a new film diptych, Ideas for Sculpture in a Setting, especially for the National Gallery exhibition, which is part of a collaboration between the National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery and Royal Academy, who are staging, respectively, her Still Life, Portrait and Landscape shows.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 28 May 2018.

LONDON
Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire

An influential figure in American landscape painting and founder of the Hudson River School, the British-born artist Thomas Cole (1801–48) travelled England and Italy and engaged actively with European art of the time. Cole's grand cycle of paintings entitled The Course of Empire will be on show, reflecting his interest in enhanced scenic ruins – a good example of this is Aqueduct near Rome, 1832 (above) – and his dialogue with other artists such as JMW Turner and John Constable. National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 11 June to 7 October 2018.

LONDON
Ed Ruscha: Course of Empire

Presenting a very different view of progress and the cyclical nature of civilisation to that of Cole's The Course of Empire Series (displayed concurrently) is Ed Ruscha's 2005 series of American landscapes that feature the industrial buildings of Los Angeles. Ruscha's Course of Empire is shown in its entirety for the first time since its debut at the 51st Venice Biennale.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 11 June to 7 October 2018.

LONDON
Tacita Dean: Portrait

While the National Gallery explores what still life means to Tacita Dean, the National Portrait Gallery next door focuses on another genre usually associated with painting – portraiture. Instead of paintings, for the first time at the gallery the emphasis will be on the medium of 16mm film. As well as two new works by Dean (Providence and
His Picture in Little), her six-screen installation STILLNESS…, 2008, which features the American choreographer Merce Cunningham, and film diptych of Ethiopian artist Julie Mehretu GDGDA, 2011, have their first showing in the UK.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0) 20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
Until 28 May 2018.

LONDON
Splendours of the Subcontinent: Four Centuries of South Asian Paintings and Manuscripts

During the 17th century, when the newly formed East India Company was bringing South Asian exports
to Britain, the Mughal empire was flourishing. Exquisite paintings and manuscripts portray the Mughal court at the time, and a number of these, presented to George III, are now held in the Royal Library at Windsor Castle. The collection grew as the East India Company rose in prominence and continually gifted manuscripts to the monarch. Queen Victoria received many illuminated letters, paintings, manuscripts and books from India, including a volume of her journals translated into Hindi. Her Hindustani diaries and phrase book will be on show too, giving a glimpse of her studies with her secretary Abdul Karim. Pictured above is Queen Tissarakshita, 1911, by Abanindranath Tagore (1871–1951), founder of the Indian Society of Oriental Art.
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 8 June to 14 October 2018.

LONDON
The Great Spectacle: 250 Years of the Summer Exhibition

This year the Royal Academy of Arts celebrates its 250-year history; its Summer Exhibition has been held annually without interruption since 1769. Highlights from past RA exhibitions will be on display, including works by Thomas Lawrence, John Everett Millais, Frederic Lord Leighton, Tracey Emin, Zaha Hadid and David Hockney. A Private View, 1881 (below) by William Powell Frith, sums up this great social occasion at the height of its fashionability.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 12 June to 19 August 2018.

LONDON
The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War

One little-known aspect of the Second World War is the contribution made by a group of 70 Brazilian Modernist artists. In 1944 they exhibited and sold their work to raise funds for the British military effort. It was the first Brazilian collective exhibition in the UK, hosted across eight galleries around the country. Paintings by 20 of the artists, including Thea Haberfeld, Candido Portinari, and Emiliano Di Cavalcanti, ended up in public collections. They are reunited for the first time since 1944 in this exhibition.
Sala Brasil Arts Centre, Embassy of Brazil in London
+44 (0)20 7747 4500
(www.theartofdiplomacy.com)
Until 22 June 2018.

LONDON
Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One

When the First World War ended 100 years ago, it left its mark on art in Britain, Germany and France. Works created between 1916 and 1932 reflect how artists reacted to the physical and psychological scars of the dreadful conflict felt across European society, and how they engaged with themes, such as remembrance and rebuilding. Over 150 pieces from this challenging period are on display, including works by William Orpen, Otto Dix, Stanley Spencer, Hannah Höch and Winifred Knights, whose The Deluge of 1920 is shown above.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 5 June to 16 September 2018.

LONDON
Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up

With her brightly coloured clothing and disticntive eyebrows the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907–54) cultivated a highly individual look that can be seen in her self-portraits. This is the first exhibition, outside Mexico, to show her most intimate possessions, including her medical corsets and prosthetics, displayed with photographs of her including Frida with Olmec figurine, 1939 (above), jewellery and letters, which reveal how she proudly drew on Mexican traditions in her Covoacán home, the Blue House.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 16 June to 4 November 2018.


LONDON
Fashioned from Nature

Exploring the relationship between fashion and nature since 1600, including camouflage, such as the 1998 design for a suit by Richard James (above), this exhibition shows work by Stella McCartney, Christopher Raeburn and Vivienne Westwood. It also highlights the challenges of sustainability in the fashion industry and showcases some of the research and cutting-edge processes involved.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 27 January 2019.

LONDON
James Cook: The Voyages
To mark 250 years since Captain James Cook set sail from Plymouth on Endeavour at the start of his first expedition, the British Library brings together original documents by the on-board artists, scientists and seamen to illuminate the story of Cook's three major voyages of exploration to the Pacific, and the encounters that improved British knowledge of the world's geography. Journals, maps, handwritten log books, natural history drawings (including the first European depiction of a kangaroo) and drawings by Polynesian high priest and navigator Tupaia, who joined the ship in Tahiti, show the variety of talents exhbitied by these pioneering voyagers.
British Library
(www.bl.uk)
+44 (0)1937 546546
From 27 April to 28 August 2018.

LONDON
Monet & Architecture

Monet is widely praised for his sensitive depictions of the natural world – gardens, landscapes and the sea – but in this exhibition it is his response to the built environment that is under the microscope. In an interview in 1895, the artist said: 'Other painters paint a bridge, a house, a boat… I want to paint the air that surrounds the bridge, the house, the boat – the beauty of the light in which they exist.' The works on display reveal how he set out to do just this throughout his career. Village scenes and modern cityscapes reflect the changes in society in Monet's day. Among the highlights are his iconic pictures of Venice and London.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 9 April to 29 July 2018.

LONDON
Joan Jonas
With a range of works spanning five decades, from the late 1960s to the present, Tate Modern is mounting the largest UK exhibition of the boundary-pushing art of American artist Joan Jonas. She is a pioneer of video and performance and her cutting-edge installations address topical themes, such as climate change and extinction.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 14 March to 5 August 2018.

LONDON
Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy
Focusing on one particularly prolific year in the life of Picasso, Tate Modern's first solo exhibition devoted to one of the 20th-century's most popular and influential artists brings together more than 100 paintings, sculptures and drawings as well as photographs, that offer an insight into his personal life. One of the highlights of the show is a set of three images of his lover, Marie-Thérèse Walter, which Picasso painted in five days in March 1932, now shown together for the first time since their creation.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 8 March to 9 September 2018.


LONDON
All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life

Focusing on the visceral work of Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, this exhibition examines how artists in the 20th century have responded to the challenge of capturing their personal experiences of life in paint, imbuing their creations with both sensuality and intimacy – Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud, 1964 (above) by his friend Bacon, is one example. Figurative paintings by other artists, such as Stanley Spencer, Walter Sickert, Frank Auerbach and RB Kitaj, are also on show and connections are made with different generations of artists. Women artists and their role in an world of male-dominated figurative painting are put in the spotlight in works by Paula Rego, Cecily Brown, Celia Paul, Jenny Saville and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 28 February to 27 August 2018.


LONDON
Ocean Liners: Speed & Style

The glitz and glamour of the golden age of ocean travel are recreated in this exhibition, which explores all aspects of design of some of the most luxurious vessels of the 19th and 20th centuries, and considers the wider cultural impact and lasting appeal of ocean liners. More than 100 years of high-end engineering, architecture, interior design, onboard lifestyle and fashion are set out, from Brunel's 1859 Atlantic steamship The Great Eastern to the 1969 launch of the QE2. With more than 250 artefacts, including paintings, ship models, furniture, and posters on show the highlights include: Art Deco interiors, such as a stylish panel from The Rape of Europa, 1934, by Jean Dupas (above) that once adorned the Normandie, which was launched in 1935. Also displayed are Lady Marguerite Allen's pearl and diamond Cartier tiara, saved from the sinking Lusitania when it was torpedoed in 1915 (Lady Allen survived); and a panel fragment from the first-class lounge of that most iconic of ill-fated ships, the Titanic.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 3 February until
10 June 2018.

NORWICH
The Square Box on the Hill

As a Norman palace, a prison and a public museum, Norwich Castle sits on the largest man-made mound in the country and has dominated the cityscape since the 12th century. With plans afoot to develop the keep as part of the Norwich Castle: Gateway to Medieval England project, this show surveys the many past transformations of the castle through architectural plans by Sir John Soane, paintings, brewery memorabilia, and fragments of medieval masonry.
Norwich Castle
+44 (0)1603 495897
(www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk)
Until 3 June 2018.

NOTTINGHAM
Scaling the Sublime: art at the limits of landscape

In the 18th and 19th centuries, Romantic artists attracted to the immense power of nature painted 'Sublime' landscapes and seascapes featuring dramatic mountains and dark chasms, tempestuous climes, avalanches and volcanic eruptions. Now seven contemporary artists, Martin John Callanan, Simon Faithfull, Tim Knowles, Mariele Neudecker, Rebecca Partridge (also a co-curator of the show), Katie Paterson, and Richard T Walker – consider our relationship with nature in the present day with works in a range of media, drawing inspiration from glaciers, icecaps, forests, the moon and stars.
Djanogly Gallery, Nottingham Lakeside Arts
+44 (0)115 846 7777
(www.lakesidearts.org.uk)
Until 17 June 2018.

OXFORD
America's Cool Modernism: O'Keeffe to Hopper

Paintings, photographs and prints by American artists of the 1920s and 1930s offer an overview of Modernism in the USA. With loans from the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Met, this is the first time many of them have been seen outside the USA. Early works by Georgia O'Keeffe, such as Black Abstraction, 1927 (above), are on show alongside Edward Hopper's cityscapes, the Precisionist work of Charles Demuth, Paul Strand's photographs, a painting by the American poet ee cummings and one by Edward Steichen, who destroyed most of his paintings before turning to photography.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
From 23 March to 22 July 2018.

OXFORD
From Sappho to Suffrage: Women Who Dared
An important anniversary being celebrated this year is the centenary of the Representation of the People Act of 1918, which gave the vote to British women over the age of 30, with a property qualification. Marking 100 years
of women's suffrage, the Bodleian is highlighting the remarkable achievements of women who defied expectations, from pirates and explorers to suffragettes, and going as far back as the poet Sappho.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
From 6 March 2018 to
3 February 2019.

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Collecting Stories: Native American Art

Although Native American art formed part of the MFA's founding collections, the Navajo weavings, and items such as Plains Indians' beadwork and Zuni Pueblo pottery, like this Olla, or water-jar, 1820–40 (above), that entered the museum in its early days, are rarely seen. Now they have been put under the spotlight in this examination of the history of Native American art in the museum's holdings and displays.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 10 March 2019.

BOSTON, Massachusetts
Mark Rothko: Reflection

Mark Rothko (1903–70) is well-known for his vast canvases and considered use of colour. He expressed his persisting belief that art should be experienced rather than merely viewed, and this exhibition sets out to give visitors the opportunity to do just that, to experience the immenseness of his iconic large-scale work. The entire span of Rothko's career is represented, starting with his early Surrealist works. The show also explores his admiration for the Old Masters and the long-held tradition that artists continually refer to the past. This is exemplified by the juxtaposition of two portraits of artists, Rothko's Thru the Window, 1938–39, and Rembrandt's Artist
in his Studio, circa 1628.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 1 July 2018.

DENVER, Colorado
Dead Sea Scrolls

Discovered in the Qumran Caves in the 1940s, the Dead Sea Scrolls are texts on parchment and papyrus that include the oldest known Bible manuscripts. Twenty of them (shown in rotation of 10 at a time) are on display in a presentation of artefacts from the region organised by the Israel Antiquities Authority. Among 600 objects are inscriptions, seals, weapons, mosaics, ceramics and textiles that offer an opportunity to see the traditions and beliefs of the ancient Middle East and their lasting cultural impact.
Denver Museum of Nature & Science
+ 1 303 370 6000
(www.dmns.org)
Until 3 September 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh

When Howard Carter found 'wonderful things' inside the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, the world was captivated. Now, a large number of these 'wonderful things' are on a world tour, starting in Los Angeles. Sculptures, a gilded wooden bed, jewellery, and more are used to trace Tutankhamun's story –from his death and journey through the underworld to immortality in this world and the next.
California Science Center
+1 323-724-3623 (www.californiasciencecenter.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
American Photography

The early history of photography often focuses on Europe, but while American photographers were at first slow to embrace negative-positive practices, they were still involved in experimentation. In 19th-century America, paper negatives and paper photographs became important pieces of documentary evidence of the Civil War, territorial expansions and treaties. They produced images of themselves and of soldiers away at war gazing upon their distant loved ones, and loved ones gazing back.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 27 May 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
Rembrandt and the Inspiration of India

The Dutch Golden Age artist Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–69) made copies after portraits from Mughal India more than after any other works of art. Four Mughal Elders Seated Under a Tree, circa 1656 (above) is one of 23 to survive and they are the only extant Rembrandt drawings on costly Asian paper, which hints at their value to the artist. Together with the original Mughal paintings that inspired them, the drawings highlight the impact of global trade on artists from different cultures.
J. Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 24 June 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
Beyond the Nile

The inaugural exhibition in the Getty Museum's new series, The Classical World in Context, charts the cultural and artistic links between Egypt, Greece and Rome from 3000 BC to AD 300. Egyptian stone vessels were sent to Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece, Egyptian statuary influenced Archaic Greek sculpture, and Egyptian religious cults spread through the Roman Empire. It was a two-way interaction: for example, portraits made in the Ptolemaic period, a time of cultural hybridisation, were often in a dual style. The ring (above), shows Ptolemy VI Philometor (186–145 BC) wearing the double crown of Egypt.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
From 27 March to
9 September 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
Plato in LA: Contemporary Artists' Visions
A third exhibition marking the reopening of the Getty Villa looks at modern artistic responses to one of the most influential thinkers in the Western world, the ancient Athenian philosopher Plato. Sculptures, paintings, drawings and installations by artists, such as Jeff Koons, Huang Yong Ping, Rachel Harrison, Whitney McVeigh, Raymond Pettibon and others, tackle Platonic concepts ranging from the meaning of the written word and the nature of reality and encouarge encourage quiet contemplation.
Getty Villa
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
From 18 April to 3 September 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici

Portrait of Doña María Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas, circa 1762 (above) by Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (1713–72), is one of several newly restored paintings from 18th-century New Spain (Mexico) that offer an insight into the cultural climate of the time. During this period, artists set up academies, worked with great versatility on portraits, casta paintings (depicting racially mixed families), and scenes for grand chapels and university halls. In an expression of local pride, they added to their canvases not just their signatures, but two Latin words: pinxit Mexici (painted in Mexico).
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 22 July 2018.



NEW YORK, New York
Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)

As Louis XIV would have wanted, his opulent palace of Versailles has stood the test of time and attracted many visitors since he moved his court there in 1682. Using the relocation as a starting point, this exhibition focuses on the following century of visits from royalty, ambassadors, artists, scientists and daytrippers up until 1789 and Louis XVI's forced move to Paris by the revolutionary mob. A wide variety of items, such as Fan with a View of the Château de Versailles, circa 1780–85 (above), give a glimpse of different experiences of Versailles and the impression the palace made.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 29 July 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination

Staged at The Met Fifth Avenue and at The Met Cloisters, this exhibition brings together Vatican vestments, medieval art and modern women's wear to investigate the influence of the high church on high fashion. Among the many world-famous designers featured are: Cristobal Balenciaga, Coco Chanel, Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana, Jean Paul Gaultier, Jeanne Lanvin, Yves Saint Laurent, Elsa Schiaparelli and Donatella Versace.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
(The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters)
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 10 May to 8 October 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
The Second Buddha: Master of Time

The legends of Padmasambhava, who is believed to have played a vital role in converting Tibet to Buddhism, see him overcome obstacles, liberate himself from life and death, and blur notions of time. Works from the 13th to the 20th century (and new interactive technology) tell the story of this key figure, hailed by Tibetans as 'The Second Buddha', with a focus on the links between past and future for establishing identity and projecting teachings forward for a more enlightened time.
Rubin Museum of Art
+1 212 620 5000
(www.rubinmuseum.org)
Until 7 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art
Although frightening, the deadly gorgon Medusa is often portrayed as beautiful and feminine rather than grotesque. This fascinating shift in visual representation first started in the 5th century BC, when other female mythical creatures, including sphinxes, sirens and Scylla, underwent a similar transformation. Art from the Classical world and beyond is used to explore the relationship between beauty and fear, and how the ancient femme fatale combined erotic desire, violence and death, and became a model for the late 19th-century reactions to women's empowerment.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 6 January 2019.


NEW YORK, New York
Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer

Real and mythical animals adorn a large number of luxury objects from late Imperial China. This exhibition takes a close look at Chinese decorative art, focusing on creatures that appear in silk and lacquer between the 13th and the 18th centuries. Dragons, unicorns, phoenixes, butterflies, lions and oxen all appear on robes, rank badges, tapestry panels used for decorating interiors, and an array of lacquer vessels produced by imperial workshops, including a fine Ming dynasty red lacquer box (above).
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 22 July 2018.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.

ST LOUIS, Missouri
Sunken Cities: Egypt's Lost Worlds

The touring exhibition showcasing finds from the lost Egyptian cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus makes its North American debut in St Louis. More than 250 remarkably well-preserved objects, recovered from beneath the waves between 1996 and 2012 by the French archaeologist Franck Goddio and his team, offer an insight into these two once thriving port cities on the Nile delta, which were lost to the sea by the 9th century AD. The exhibition uses exquisite metalwork, gold jewellery, stelae and statues to explore the richly interactive relationship between Greece and Egypt (conquered by Alexander the Great in 332 BC) and to shed light on the cult of Osiris, which was particularly popular in these cities.
Saint Louis Art Museum
+1 314 721 0072
(www.slam.org)
From 25 March to 9 September 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
To Dye For: Ikats from Central Asia

With their distinctive patterns and bright colours, Ikats have a wide appeal. In 2005, Oscar de la Renta helped secure their place in contemporary fashion by including the Central Asian designs in his collection. Others followed suit and the motifs soon spread to T-shirts, stationery and wallpaper. Ikat hangings and coats from Central Asia and designs by de la Renta are displayed together to investigate the original function of the fabrics and highlight their lasting appeal.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery
+1 202 633 1000
(www.freersackler.si.edu)
Until 29 July 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
Heavenly Earth: Images of Saint Francis at La Verna

In September 1224, Francis of Assisi spent 40 days fasting and praying in the wilderness of La Verna, Tuscany, in order to share in Christ's suffering. As the story goes, a seraph in the form of a crucified man appeared and left Francis imprinted with Christ's wounds until the end of his life two years later. The stigmatisation of St Francis is the first recorded incident of this kind in the Christian tradition. It was an important moment for monasticism (La Verna is an active monastery to this day) and this exhibition looks at images of St Francis, in print and paint, from the late 15th to mid-18th centuries. These include a German woodcut (above) from circa 1500–10, showing St Francis receiving the stigmata,
National Gallery of Art
+1 20 27 37 42 157 15
(www.nga.gov)
From 25 February to 8 July 2018.



WASHINGTON DC
Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice across Asia

Buddhist art from a diverse range of Asian countries has been brought together for this exhibition, which considers how sacred objects and artworks are an integral part of Buddhism. More than 250 remarkable artefacts, including a 14th-century, gilt-copper Buddha from central Tibet (above), are on display. They reveal the power they embody and the relationships between objects, people and ritual. This exhibition also contains two experiential spaces. One is the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room from the Alice S Kandell Collection, in which many objects are displayed as they would be in the shrine of a noble family.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)
Until October 2020.

BELGIUM


BRUGES
Mummies in Bruges: Secrets of Ancient Egypt

Human and animal mummies, including the Mummy of Pawiamen, 700–650 BC (above), from the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden's collection are shown alongside statues, stelae, burial gifts, papyrus sheets from the Book of the Dead, magical amulets and scarabs, to bring to light ancient Egyptian ways of life, rituals, burial customs and beliefs about the afterlife. Scans of the mummies also virtually unwrap them to reveal the secrets of the mummification process.
Oud Sint-Jan Exhibition Centre
+32 50 47 61 00
(www.xpo-center-bruges.be)
Until 11 November 2018.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
High on Luxury: Lost Treasures from the Roman Empire

Some 90 objects – including goblets, dishes and statues – comprise the spectacular Berthouville Treasure. This set of 1st-2nd-century AD Roman silverware, weighing 25kg, was discovered in northwest France in 1830, where it lay hidden on the site of the burned down Temple of Mercury since the 3rd century. After four years of cleaning and restoration, these luxury goods are on display in an exhibition that indulges in the extravagances of the Roman Empire and lavish feasting.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptoteket
+45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.dk)
Until 2 September 2018.

FRANCE
LENS
The Rose Empire: Masterpieces of 19th-century Persian art

The Qajar dynasty ruled Persia (modern-day Iran) from 1786 and 1985. In this period prolific court artists created a wondrous array of art, using traditional techniques in painting, glasswork and metalwork. Over 400 works, many from private collections and on public view for the first time, are in a setting by Christian Lacroix designed to evoke the palace of Fath Ali Shah in Sulaymaniyah (r 1797–1834). As well as charting traditional practices, including drawing and calligraphy, by the rulers themselves, they reveal how Nasseredin Shah introduced photography in the 1840s and how changing Qajar styles still influence contemporary Iranian art.
Louvre Lens
+33 3 21 18 62 62
(www.louvrelens.fr)
Until 22 July 2018.

PARIS
Gérard Garouste: Diane and Actaeon

Important texts like the Bible, the Talmud, and Cervantes' Don Quixote have served as inspiration for Gérard Garouste's paintings, engravings and sculptures, but, for the Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature, he turned his attention to the legend of Diana, the goddess of the hunt, and the ill-fated hunter Actaeon who was torn to pieces by his own hounds. Garouste, has created a number of works based on this myth, including Diane et Actéon, 2015, (above), which have now been brought together in this exhibition.
Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature
+33 1 53 01 92 40
(www.chassenature.org)
Until 1 July 2018.

PARIS
Neanderthal
Neanderthals have received some bad press since the first discovery of a skull in Germany's Neander valley in 1856, but recent research is continuing to transform our ideasabout this species. With Neanderthal remains on show, such as this 60,000-year-old skull (above) from La Chapelle-aux-Saints, this exhibition explores changing public perception, depictions in the arts and latest scientific investigations.
Musée de l'Homme
+33 1 44 05 72 72
(www.museedelhomme.fr)
Until 7 January 2019.

PARIS
Ghosts and Hells: The underworld in Asian art

Focusing on ghost stories from China, Thailand and Japan, this exhibition takes a look at how the spirit world has been manifest down the centuries in religious art, Hokusai prints, theatre, cinema, contemporary design, manga (Japanese comics) and PAC-MAN (a video game). Here. you can meet a wide range of ghosts, including supernatural cat-women, hungry spirits who have come back from the dead, jumping vampires and yokai from Japanese folklore.
Musée du quai branly–Jacques Chirac
+33 1 56 61 70 0
(www.quaibranly.fr)
Until 15 July 2018.

PARIS
The Epic of The Suez Canal: From the Pharaohs to the 21st century
The Suez Canal was constructed between 1859 and 1869 to connect the Mediterranean and the Red Sea. An impressive feat of engineering it has had an historic impact on travel and trade in the region. This exhibition explores the long history of the canal and related themes in Egypt, from the pharaohs up to the 2015 inauguration of the Suez Canal extension, through archaeological finds, photographs, scale models and archival film footage.
Institut du monde arabe
+33 1 40 51 38 38
(www.imarabe.org)
From 28 March to 5 August 2018.


PARIS
Delacroix (1798–1863)
For this comprehensive tour of the career of one of France's finest painters, more than 180 works by Eugène Delacroix are on show. They include his early works, exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1820, historic and mythological scenes, such as his Medée furieuse, 1838 (above), and his later religious and landscape compositions. The paintings reflect Delacroix's consciousness of his place in art history, pursuing individuality while at the same time following 16th- and 17th-century Flemish and Venetian artists.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 29 March to 23 July 2018.

PARIS
Guernica
On 26 April 1937, the Basque town of Guernica was destroyed by aerial bombing during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso created his painting Guernica for the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne that same year. The vast and haunting monochrome canvas, which captures the chaos and violence of war, evoking pity and terror, has been reproduced across the world. The iconic painting is
on loan from the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía with a number of related sketches, and the exhibition tells the story of the creation of the work and the impact of the Spanish Civil War on Picasso.
Musée national Picasso-Paris
+33 1 85 56 00 36
(www.museepicassoparis.fr)
From 27 March to 29 July 2018.

PARIS
Ghosts and Hells: The Underworld in Asian Art
Focusing on ghost stories from China, Thailand and Japan, this exhibition takes a look at how the spirit world has manifested itself down the centuries in religious art, Hokusai prints, theatre, cinema, contemporary design, Magma creations and, even, Pac Man. Visitors will meet a wide range of spirits, including cat-women, the hungry spirits of the dead, jumping vampires, and yokai (supernatural creatures from Japanese folklore).
Musée du quai branly – Jacques Chirac
+33 1 56 61 70 0
(www.quaibranly.fr)
From 10 April to 15 July 2018.

NETHERLANDS


AMSTERDAM
High Society

Portraiture is one way in which the rich and powerful project their status. Commissioning the finest artists comes at a price as do the high-end garments the sitters wear. This exhibition brings together full length, life-size standing portraits of princes, aristocrats and other prominent and wealthy individuals – from the 16th to the 20th centuries. This standardise, but potent, format was adopted by the likes of Veronese, Velázquez, Reynolds, Gainsborough, Sargent, Munch and Manet. Highlights include Rembrandt's recently restored wedding portraits of Marten Soolmans and Oopjen Coppit and Cranach the Elder's depiction of the sumptuously dressed Henry the Pious, Duke of Saxony, 1514 (above). A concurrent exhibition of prints and drawings, called Guilty Pleasures, takes a peek at the privates lives of high society and their sometimes illicit entertainments of reckless gambling, excessive drinking, wild partying and visiting brothels.
Rijksmuseum
+31 20 674 7000
(www.rijksmuseum.nl)
From 8 March to 3 June 2018.

 

SPAIN



BILBAO
Esther Ferrer: Intertwined Spaces

Installations by one of Spain's leading performance artists, octogenarian Esther Ferrer, highlight the participatory aspect of art, presenting viewers with questions that encourage them to form their own interpretations. Central to Ferrer's diverse work, much of it here not seen before, is the construction of space, reflected in a selection of pieces, such as Napoleon's Triangle, from the 1980s (above).
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 10 June 2018.

MADRID
Victor Vasarely: The birth of Op Art

Tracing the evolution of the Hungarian artist Victor Vasarely (1908–97), this exhibition examines his important creative output in France and his role in developing post-war geometric abstraction and Op Art. Paintings by Vasarely also offer us a chance to reflect on his experimentation and his interest in a closer union between art and society.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
From 7 June to 9 September 2018.

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
DUBAI
Art & Jewelry

As this exquisite selection of bracelets, necklaces, earrings and rings shows, many artists in the 20th and 21st centuries turned their hands to designing jewellery, often for their lovers or wives. Paintings, sculpture and works on paper shed light on the relationship between art and jewellery. Anish Kapoor's jewellery, for instance, continues the sense of play with depth and perception seen in his sculpture, while Alexander Calder's pieces share their tribal, African-inspired symbols with his gouaches and mobiles. Other notable artists whose wotk is featured include: Pablo Picasso, Peter Blake, Lucio Fontana, Anthony Gormley, Jeff Koons and Marc Quinn.
Custot Gallery
+971 4 346 8148
(www.custotgallerydubai.ae)
Until 2 June 2018.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM



GLASGOW
Glasgow Greek Weekend

Bringing together philhellenes
from across Scotland, this event celebrates all things Greek. At the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, on Saturday there will be talks on Herakles, political exiles on Anafi, and sculpture, as well as stalls selling books and Greek products, and an exhibition of Hellenic-inspired works by local artists. On Sunday, there will be tours of Glasgow's atmospheric, Classically-inspired necropolis (above) and the city's Neoclassical buildings, and around the Ancient Greek vases in the Hunterian Museum.
19–20 May
www.scottishhellenic.org

LONDON
Accordia Lectures
Late Antique diptychs and their use in Carolingian Italy

Cristina La Rocca
Joint Lecture with the UCL Institute of Archaeology
8 May
Room 612,
UCL Institute of Archaeology
www.ucl.ac.uk/accordia/

Ancient Philosophy Seminar 2017–18
Cosmology and Human Nature in the Timaeus

Emily Fletcher
14 May
Seminars organised by the Institute of Classical Studies are held Mondays 4.30–6.30pm
Room 243, Senate House
ics.sas.ac.uk/events

Institute of Classical Studies Lectures
Dorothy Tarrant Lecture

The Goddess and Damned Wrath: How a Linguist Reads the Iliad
Josh Katz
8 May, 5pm
Room G22/26, Senate House

JP Barron Memorial Lecture
Socrates, Eros and Magic

Angie Hobbs
6 June, 5pm
Room G22/26, Senate House
ics.sas.ac.uk/events

A Life on the Road: the Exploits and Adventures of the 17th-century Ottoman Traveller, Evliya Çelebi

In this British Institute at Ankara Lecture, Ottoman historian and Evliya Çelebi expert Caroline Finkel discusses the inquisitive courtier, his travels and his writings, with a special focus on his 1671 Haj journey.
17 May, 6.30pm
British Academy
Carlton House Terrace
www.biaa.ac.uk/events

London Summer School in Classics
This summer school offers intensive classes in Latin and Greek at all levels, as well as beginners' courses in Syriac, Coptic, Biblical Hebrew, plus other lectures and workshops.
10–19 July
King's College London
www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/study/summerclass/
index.aspx

Summer School in Ancient Philosophy
Through lectures, debates and close readings of texts (mainly in translation), this summer school explores some of the principal issues and figures in ancient philosophy. The main subjects of the five courses are an introduction to ancient philosophy, metaphysics, ethics, and epistemology (taught with translated texts), and Plato's Symposium (using the original Greek text).
16–20 July
UCL
www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/outreach/summer-schools/Ancient Philosophy/2018-summer-school-ancient-philosophy

SWANSEA
Summer School in Ancient Languages

Swansea University offers intensive summer courses of one or two weeks in classical Latin, ancient Greek, medieval Latin and hieroglyphs. There are classes to suit people at different levels, and the summer school also arranges talks, films and optional trips to Welsh sites of historical interest.
15–28 July
Swansea University
www.swansea.ac.uk/classics/summerschoolinancientlanguages

 

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