Events


UNITED KINGDOM


DEDHAM, Essex
Munnings and the River

In the 250th anniversary year of the Royal Academy, this exhibition takes a look at a less familiar aspect of the career of one of its presidents – Sir Alfred Munnings. He is best known for his equestrian and sporting scenes but, here, his landscapes are in the spotlight. Rivers provided a backdrop for most of the artist's life, from his childhood home in a watermill to his later residence near the Stour in Dedham, and it is these natural features that flow through his landscape paintings, such as Tagg's Island 1919 (above) on the Thames.
Munnings Museum
+44 (0)1206 322127
(www.munningsmuseum.org.uk)
Until 31 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
Canaletto and the Art of Venice

Over 100 paintings, drawings, and prints by Canaletto (1697–1768) and his contemporaries show how they captured the allure of Venice. Not only did they meticulously record the vibrancy of the city around them, they also developed the capriccio, architectural fantasies conjuring up Classical ruins, which can be seen in Canaletto's A Capriccio View with Ruins, circa 1742–44 (above), Marco Riccis's Caprice View with Roman Ruins, circa 1729, and Landscape with Classical Ruins, Cattle and Figures, circa 1741–42, by Francesco Zuccarelli. All these paintings come from the Royal Collection. They were acquired by George III from Joseph Smith (circa 1674−1770), an English merchant and later British Consul in Venice. The king, a great patron of the arts, bought almost all Smith's collection in 1762, an acquisition that has made the Royal Collection one of the pre-eminent collections of 18th-century Venetian art in the world containing the largest number of works by Canaletto.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 11 May to 21 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
Emil Nolde: Colour is Life

The German Expressionist Emil Nolde (1867–1956) was the single figure most heavily featured in the Degenerate Art exhibition of 1937 in Munich, where 33 of his works were displayed. Although he had joined the Nazi party, they still confiscated more than 1000 of his paintings. So, unable to work as a professional artist, he created his 'unpainted pictures', in the form of vibrant watercolours. This show surveys Nolde's career through these turbulent times with these watercolours displayed alongside his paintings, drawings and prints.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
From 14 July to 21 October 2018.

EDINBURGH
Raqib Shaw: Reinventing the Old Masters
The Old Masters offer inspiration for many, and Raqib Shaw, whose vast but intricate works are created in enamels with a porcupine quill, is no exception. Shaw's work is on show alongside earlier paintings from the National Galleries of Scotland collection that have influenced him. Examples include: Lucas Cranach's An Allegory of Melancholy, 1528, and Joseph Noel Paton's The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania, 1849.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until Sunday 28 October 2018.

GRASMERE, Cumbria
In Search of Mary Shelley: The Girl who wrote Frankenstein

In celebration of 100 years of votes for women and the bicentenary of the publication of Frankenstein, this exhibition – part of a programme named 'Women Behind the Words' – takes a closer look at the young author, Mary Shelley, whose novel was published when she was only 20. Curated by poet and Shelley biographer Fiona Sampson, the exhibition delves into the world of radical new ideas that framed the writer's upbringing and thinking.
Wordsworth Trust
+44(0)15394 35544
(www.wordsworth.org.uk)
Until 27 August 2018.

LIVERPOOL
Beautiful world, where are you?

In the 10th Liverpool Biennial, over 40 artists from 22 countries grapple with social, environmental and political uncertainty in the world today – as evoked by the words of the 18th-century German poet Friedrich Schiller: 'Beautiful world, where are you?' Artist Mohamed Bourouissa showcases an Algerian-inspired 'healing' garden, while Dale Harding, a descendant of the Bidjara, Ghungalu and Garingbal peoples of Australia, uses wall paintings to engage with the untold histories of his communities, as in Ngaya boonda yinda nayi yoolgoogoo/ I carry you in my heart, 2016 (above).
Venues across Liverpool
+44 (0)151 709 7444
(www.biennial.com)
From 14 July to 28 October 2018.

LIVERPOOL
Egon Schiele/Francesca Woodman

Drawings by the early 20th-century Austrian Expressionist artsist Egon Schiele, who died 100 years ago, and photographs by the later American artist Francesca Woodman (1958–81) together demonstrate innovative approaches to capturing movement through dynamic compositions. Both artists created intimate nude portraits and self-portraits with the focus on emotional intensity – Schiele used quick, sharp lines and Woodman used long exposures.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 24 May to 23 September 2018.



LONDON
Edward Bawden

Throughout his long career, which spanned 60 years, Edward Bawden (1903–89) demonstrated his great versatility and humour as an artist and designer. He also had a flair for storytelling, which can be seen in his linocuts depicting Aesop's Fables, such as The Gnat and the Lion, 1970, (above) and the illustrated books he created for his children. Today, his artistic accomplishments are largely overshadowed by his commercial designs for companies including Fortnum & Mason and Shell. Presenting material from every stage of his career, including unseen pieces from his family's private collection, this exhibition sets out to redress this imbalance with a particular emphasis on his role in reinventing watercolour with Paul Nash and Eric Ravilious, and his work as a war artist between
1940 and 1945.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
From 23 May to 9 September 2018.

LONDON
Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire

An influential figure in American landscape painting and founder of the Hudson River School, the British-born artist Thomas Cole (1801–48) travelled England and Italy and engaged actively with European art of the time. Cole's grand cycle of paintings entitled The Course of Empire will be on show, reflecting his interest in enhanced scenic ruins – a good example of this is Aqueduct near Rome, 1832 (above) – and his dialogue with other artists such as JMW Turner and John Constable. National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 11 June to 7 October 2018.

LONDON
Ed Ruscha: Course of Empire

Presenting a very different view of progress and the cyclical nature of civilisation to that of Cole's The Course of Empire Series (displayed concurrently) is Ed Ruscha's 2005 series of American landscapes that feature the industrial buildings of Los Angeles. Ruscha's Course of Empire is shown in its entirety for the first time since its debut at the 51st Venice Biennale.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 11 June to 7 October 2018.

LONDON
Splendours of the Subcontinent: Four Centuries of South Asian Paintings and Manuscripts

During the 17th century, when the newly formed East India Company was bringing South Asian exports
to Britain, the Mughal empire was flourishing. Exquisite paintings and manuscripts portray the Mughal court at the time, and a number of these, presented to George III, are now held in the Royal Library at Windsor Castle. The collection grew as the East India Company rose in prominence and continually gifted manuscripts to the monarch. Queen Victoria received many illuminated letters, paintings, manuscripts and books from India, including a volume of her journals translated into Hindi. Her Hindustani diaries and phrase book will be on show too, giving a glimpse of her studies with her secretary Abdul Karim. Pictured above is Queen Tissarakshita, 1911, by Abanindranath Tagore (1871–1951), founder of the Indian Society of Oriental Art.
The Queen's Gallery,
Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 8 June to 14 October 2018.

LONDON
The Great Spectacle: 250 Years of the Summer Exhibition

This year the Royal Academy of Arts celebrates its 250-year history; its Summer Exhibition has been held annually without interruption since 1769. Highlights from past RA exhibitions will be on display, including works by Thomas Lawrence, John Everett Millais, Frederic Lord Leighton, Tracey Emin, Zaha Hadid and David Hockney. A Private View, 1881 (below) by William Powell Frith, sums up this great social occasion at the height of its fashionability.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8000
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)
From 12 June to 19 August 2018.

LONDON
Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up

With her brightly coloured clothing and disticntive eyebrows the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907–54) cultivated a highly individual look that can be seen in her self-portraits. This is the first exhibition, outside Mexico, to show her most intimate possessions, including her medical corsets and prosthetics, displayed with photographs of her including Frida with Olmec figurine, 1939 (above), jewellery and letters, which reveal how she proudly drew on Mexican traditions in her Covoacán home, the Blue House.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 16 June to 4 November 2018.


LONDON
Fashioned from Nature

Exploring the relationship between fashion and nature since 1600, including camouflage, such as the 1998 design for a suit by Richard James (above), this exhibition shows work by Stella McCartney, Christopher Raeburn and Vivienne Westwood. It also highlights the challenges of sustainability in the fashion industry and showcases some of the research and cutting-edge processes involved.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 27 January 2019.

LONDON
James Cook: The Voyages
To mark 250 years since Captain James Cook set sail from Plymouth on Endeavour at the start of his first expedition, the British Library brings together original documents by the on-board artists, scientists and seamen to illuminate the story of Cook's three major voyages of exploration to the Pacific, and the encounters that improved British knowledge of the world's geography. Journals, maps, handwritten log books, natural history drawings (including the first European depiction of a kangaroo) and drawings by Polynesian high priest and navigator Tupaia, who joined the ship in Tahiti, show the variety of talents exhbitied by these pioneering voyagers.
British Library
(www.bl.uk)
+44 (0)1937 546546
From 27 April to 28 August 2018.

LONDON
Monet & Architecture

Monet is widely praised for his sensitive depictions of the natural world – gardens, landscapes and the sea – but in this exhibition it is his response to the built environment that is under the microscope. In an interview in 1895, the artist said: 'Other painters paint a bridge, a house, a boat… I want to paint the air that surrounds the bridge, the house, the boat – the beauty of the light in which they exist.' The works on display reveal how he set out to do just this throughout his career. Village scenes and modern cityscapes reflect the changes in society in Monet's day. Among the highlights are his iconic pictures of Venice and London.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 9 April to 29 July 2018.

LONDON
Joan Jonas
With a range of works spanning five decades, from the late 1960s to the present, Tate Modern is mounting the largest UK exhibition of the boundary-pushing art of American artist Joan Jonas. She is a pioneer of video and performance and her cutting-edge installations address topical themes, such as climate change and extinction.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 14 March to 5 August 2018.

LONDON
Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy
Focusing on one particularly prolific year in the life of Picasso, Tate Modern's first solo exhibition devoted to one of the 20th-century's most popular and influential artists brings together more than 100 paintings, sculptures and drawings as well as photographs, that offer an insight into his personal life. One of the highlights of the show is a set of three images of his lover, Marie-Thérèse Walter, which Picasso painted in five days in March 1932, now shown together for the first time since their creation.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 8 March to 9 September 2018.


LONDON
All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life

Focusing on the visceral work of Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud, this exhibition examines how artists in the 20th century have responded to the challenge of capturing their personal experiences of life in paint, imbuing their creations with both sensuality and intimacy – Study for Portrait of Lucian Freud, 1964 (above) by his friend Bacon, is one example. Figurative paintings by other artists, such as Stanley Spencer, Walter Sickert, Frank Auerbach and RB Kitaj, are also on show and connections are made with different generations of artists. Women artists and their role in an world of male-dominated figurative painting are put in the spotlight in works by Paula Rego, Cecily Brown, Celia Paul, Jenny Saville and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 28 February to 27 August 2018.

LONDON
Bomberg

One of the Whitechapel Boys and a pupil of Walter Sickert, David Bomberg (1890–1957) explored his Polish-Jewish heritage and Yiddish culture in his work. This exhibition looks at Bomberg's contribution to pre-war British Modernism and his role as a war artist. Landscapes and portraits, and also his graphic art for 'little magazines' reveal both the influence of Sickert on him and Bomberg's interest in reworking compositions.
Ben Uri Gallery
+44 (0)20 7604 3991
(www.benuri.org.uk)
From 21 June to 16 September 2018.


LONDON
Rodin and the art of ancient Greece
The celebrated bronze, marble and plaster forms by Auguste Rodin (1840–1917), such as The Thinker (above) owe much to earlier sculptors from the Classical world, especially Phidias. Ancient masterworks, by Phidias, from the Parthenon are shown side-by-side with sculptures and sketches by Rodin, illustrating how he drew inspiration from antiquity, from his frequent visits to the British Museum and from his own collection of antiquities.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 29 July 2018.

LONDON
Money and Medals: Mapping the UK's Numismatic Collections

Highlighting the achievements of the Money and Medals Network in sharing numismatic knowledge across more than 150 institutions in the UK, this exhibition presents a selection of objects, including 19th-century replicas of ancient Greek coins, toy money, money-boxes and other items owned by Henry Hook VC who, after fighting in the Anglo-Zulu war, came home to work at the British Museum, dusting the library's books.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8299
(www.britishmuseum.org)
Until 30 September 2018.

LONDON
Asterix in Britain: The Life and Work of René Goscinny
The best-loved fictional Gaul has graced comic-books since 1959. Through original scripts, sketches, storyboards and photographs this exhibition tells the story of René Goscinny, the writer who co-created the supremely witty Asterix series with the illustrator Albert Uderzo.
The Jewish Museum
+44 (0)20 7284 7384
(www.jewishmuseum.org.uk)
Until 30 September 2018.



LONDON

Michael Jackson: On the Wall
With more than a billion records sold and still rising, nearly a decade after his death, the American super star Michael Jackson has gained icon status. His videos, choreography and individual style have all helped secure his legacy, shown in this exhibition. Many artists were drawn to Jackson including: Andy Warhol, who made a portrait of Jackson in 1984 (above), Grayson Perry, David LaChapelle, Rita Ackermann, Louise Lawler and Catherine Opie, whose works are featured in this show.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0) 20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
Until 21 October 2018.

LONDON
First Women UK
For the centenary of the Representation of the People Act, key pioneering women take centre stage in this photographic exhibition. Portraits of 100 contemporary women show their achievements in politics, music, sport and the military, including Olympic boxer Nicola Adams, musician Suzi Quatro, and poker player and presenter Victoria Coren-Mitchell.
Royal College of Arts
(www.1stwomenuk.co.uk)
From 20 July to 22 August 2018.

LONDON
The Return of the Past: Postmodernism in British Architecture
Rejecting Modernism and with a playful take on past styles, early Post-modernism was an inventive moment in British architecture. Drawings, models, replicas and fragments of buildings showcase the works of Post-modernist architects such as Terry Farrell, Jeremy Dixon and John Outram.
Sir John Soane's Museum
+ 44 (0)20 7405 2107
(www.soane.org)
Until 27 August 2018.


LONDON
Prince and Patron
As the Prince of Wales will soon turn 70, the summer opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace will feature a celebratory display of more than 100 works chosen by him. This varied selection includes his favourites from among the Royal Collection – such as Johan Joseph Zoffany's painting The Tribuna of the Uffizi, 1772–77, and Napoleon's felt and silk cloak (above). There are also pieces from his personal collection, such as a portrait of the Queen by Michael Noakes, as well as works by young artists from The Royal Drawing School and The Prince's School of Traditional Arts, and also Turquoise Mountain, an organisation that promotes sustainable urban regeneration and the revival of traditional crafts in Afghanistan, Myanmar and the Middle East.
State Rooms, Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)20 7766 7300
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 21 July to 30 September 2018.



LONDON

Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One
When the First World War ended, 100 years ago, it left its mark on art in Britain, Germany and France. Works created between 1916 and 1932 reflect how artists reacted to the physical and psychological scars of the conflict across European society, and how they engaged with themes such as remembrance and rebuilding, as in Christopher Nevinson's Ypres After the First Bombardment, 1916 (above). More than 150 works from this challenging period are on show by artists such as William Orpen, Otto Dix, Stanley Spencer, Winifred Knights and Hannah Höch.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 16 September 2018.

LONDON
Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art
In 1960, MoMA hosted a milestone photography exhibition titled The Sense of Abstraction. Now, nearly 60 years on, Tate Modern picks up the thread and examines the role of photography in abstract art from the 1910s through to the present, featuring a series by Man Ray (1890–1976) on display for the first time since the MoMA show. The varied works exhibited reflect how techniques in both painting and photography have developed over the decades. Among them are works by the American Imogen Cunningham (1883–1976), who sought abstraction from the human body in Triangle, 1928 (above), and Marta Hoepffner (1912–2000), from Germany, who responded directly to the abstract painter in Homage to Kandinsky, 1937 (above).
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 14 October 2018.

LONDON
The Future Starts Here
This exhibition delves into the emerging technologies and pioneering designs that will transform our homes, cities and the environment of the future. The projects include: a global seed-bank to preserve plant species in case of an ecological or other disaster; a shirt that can charge a smartphone and Protei (above) which is an autonomous sailing ship that helps in the cleaning up of oil spills.
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
Until 4 November 2018.

LONDON
Sir Richard Wallace: The Collector
On the bicentenary of his birth, the Wallace Collection takes a close look at its philanthropic founder and prolific collector, Sir Richard Wallace, the illegitimate son of the 4th Marquess of Hertford, who was brought up by his grandmother in Paris. His intriguing personal life and his impressive legacy are all explored in works collected by Sir Richard and displayed in the museum's new exhibition space.
Wallace Collection
+44 (0)207 563 9500
(wallacecollection.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

LONDON
TEETH
Though many dread a trip to the dentist, oral hygiene has long been important: from the Romans who tried to ward off pain with votives to modern campaigns to avoid tooth decay. Tools, chairs, dentures, made from hippopotamus ivory, and Napoleon's toothbrush all trace the evolution of professional dentistry and attitudes towards the only visible part of the human skeleton.
Wellcome Collection
+44 (0)20 7611 2222
(wellcomecollection.org)
Until 16 September 2018.

OXFORD
Ibrahim El-Salahi: A Sudanese Artist in Oxford

Works by Ibrahim El-Salahi, a key figure in African and Arab Modernism and an Oxford resident, join pieces of ancient Sudanese pottery from the Ashmolean's collection, choosen by the artist. Spanning El-Salahi's career, this exhibition features his paintings, such as The Tree, 2008 (above), drawings, and recent sculptural works that bear a strong connection to the artistic traditions of Sudan.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
Until 2 September 2018.

OXFORD
America's Cool Modernism: O'Keeffe to Hopper

Paintings, photographs and prints by American artists of the 1920s and 1930s offer an overview of Modernism in the USA. With loans from the Terra Foundation for American Art and the Met, this is the first time many of them have been seen outside the USA. Early works by Georgia O'Keeffe, such as Black Abstraction, 1927 (above), are on show alongside Edward Hopper's cityscapes, the Precisionist work of Charles Demuth, Paul Strand's photographs, a painting by the American poet ee cummings and one by Edward Steichen, who destroyed most of his paintings before turning to photography.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
From 23 March to 22 July 2018.

OXFORD
From Sappho to Suffrage: Women Who Dared
An important anniversary being celebrated this year is the centenary of the Representation of the People Act of 1918, which gave the vote to British women over the age of 30, with a property qualification. Marking 100 years
of women's suffrage, the Bodleian is highlighting the remarkable achievements of women who defied expectations, from pirates and explorers to suffragettes, and going as far back as the poet Sappho.
Weston Library
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
From 6 March 2018 to
3 February 2019.


WADDESDON
Michael Eden: Form & Transform

Historical objects from Waddesdon's remarkable collection are given a new lease of life by Michael Eden
as he reinterprets them using digital technology. His 25 new works address the relationship between different styles over time, and the practice of imitating materials that he demonstrates in a quasi-Classical manner in After Le Lorrain, 2018 (detail, above)
Coach House Gallery
Waddesdon Manor
+44 (0)1296 820414
(www.waddesdon.org.uk/michael-eden)
Until 21 October 2018.

WOODSTOCK
Yves Klein

Known for inventing the wonderful ultramarine pigment International Klein Blue, work by Yves Klein (1928–1962)
is always eye-catching, as this exhibition of more than 50 pieces shows. The French artist embraced experimentation, and his influence is felt on minimalism, conceptual and performance art.
Blenheim Palace
+44 (0)1993 810530
(www.blenheimpalace.com)
From 18 July to
7 October 2018.

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Collecting Stories: Native American Art

Although Native American art formed part of the MFA's founding collections, the Navajo weavings, and items such as Plains Indians' beadwork and Zuni Pueblo pottery, like this Olla, or water-jar, 1820–40 (above), that entered the museum in its early days, are rarely seen. Now they have been put under the spotlight in this examination of the history of Native American art in the museum's holdings and displays.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 10 March 2019.

CINCINNATI, Ohio
Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China

In 1974 farmers digging a well in Shaanxi province, China, uncovered bronze arrows and fragments of pottery that led the way to one of archaeology's greatest discoveries: the so-called Terracotta Army, 8000 life-size figures of soldiers, courtiers, acrobats and horses buried in an enormous mausoleum complex. Stunning works from collections in China tell the story of the remarkable tomb of Qin Shi Huang (259–210 BC), the First Emperor, and his legacy, and explore the relationship between the Qin dynasty and other groups in the region
Cincinnati Art Museum
+1 277 472-4226
(www.cincinnati.org)
Until 12 August 2018.

DENVER, Colorado
Dead Sea Scrolls

Discovered in the Qumran Caves in the 1940s, the Dead Sea Scrolls are texts on parchment and papyrus that include the oldest known Bible manuscripts. Twenty of them (shown in rotation of 10 at a time) are on display in a presentation of artefacts from the region organised by the Israel Antiquities Authority. Among 600 objects are inscriptions, seals, weapons, mosaics, ceramics and textiles that offer an opportunity to see the traditions and beliefs of the ancient Middle East and their lasting cultural impact.
Denver Museum of Nature & Science
+ 1 303 370 6000
(www.dmns.org)
Until 3 September 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
In Focus: Expressions

In the early days of photography, lengthy exposure times meant that smiling was not the norm when posing for the camera. This all changed in the 1880s when faster film and hand-held cameras came into use, and a beaming smile was soon championed by advertisers as a clear sign of customer satisfaction. As well as tracing how photography can capture human expressions, be they staged, candidly caught in the moment or sometimes open to (mis)interpretation, this exhibition considers the role of the mask in images and physiognomy.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
Until 7 October 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh

When Howard Carter found 'wonderful things' inside the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, the world was captivated. Now, a large number of these 'wonderful things' are on a world tour, starting in Los Angeles. Sculptures, a gilded wooden bed, jewellery, and more are used to trace Tutankhamun's story –from his death and journey through the underworld to immortality in this world and the next.
California Science Center
+1 323-724-3623 (www.californiasciencecenter.org)
Until 6 January 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
Beyond the Nile

The inaugural exhibition in the Getty Museum's new series, The Classical World in Context, charts the cultural and artistic links between Egypt, Greece and Rome from 3000 BC to AD 300. Egyptian stone vessels were sent to Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece, Egyptian statuary influenced Archaic Greek sculpture, and Egyptian religious cults spread through the Roman Empire. It was a two-way interaction: for example, portraits made in the Ptolemaic period, a time of cultural hybridisation, were often in a dual style. The ring (above), shows Ptolemy VI Philometor (186–145 BC) wearing the double crown of Egypt.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
From 27 March to
9 September 2018.

LOS ANGELES, California
Plato in LA: Contemporary Artists' Visions
A third exhibition marking the reopening of the Getty Villa looks at modern artistic responses to one of the most influential thinkers in the Western world, the ancient Athenian philosopher Plato. Sculptures, paintings, drawings and installations by artists, such as Jeff Koons, Huang Yong Ping, Rachel Harrison, Whitney McVeigh, Raymond Pettibon and others, tackle Platonic concepts ranging from the meaning of the written word and the nature of reality and encouarge encourage quiet contemplation.
Getty Villa
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu)
From 18 April to 3 September 2018.

MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota
Horse Nation of the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ

Horses have played an important role in societies across the world, and they continue to be revered by the Dakhóta, Nakhóta, and Lakhóta people – known as the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Seven Council Fires) – who regard them as relatives and an essential part of the community, as well as their allies in battle or in hunting. Paintings, textiles, film and beadwork by leading contemporary Native American artists, such as Preston Neal's Horse with Yankton Sioux Mask, 2016 (above), show how this noble animal can influence history, spirituality and culture.
Minneapolis Institute of Art
+1 888 642 2787
(new.artsmia.org)
Until 3 February 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985

With a focus on how the female body can be used powerfully and creatively to express political and social criticism in Latin America at a time when many women artists were working under harsh conditions, paintings, sculpture, photography, video and performance pieces have been brought together to bear witness to these remarkable women and their contributions to a period of conceptual and aesthetic experimentation. The diverse range of art on display includes work by Colombian sculptor Feliza Bursztyn (1933–82), Cuban‐born abstract painter Zilia Sánchez (b 1926), Peruvian composer and choreographer Victoria Santa Cruz (1922–2014), and Chicana graphic artist Ester Hernández (b 1944).
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718 638 5000
(www.brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 22 July 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix
Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) is best known for his large-scale French Romantic paintings that recreate historic
scenes, but his skill and output as a draughtsman is also a significant part of his work. More than 100 works on paper – selected from the Karen B Cohen collection that was gifted to the Met – include finished watercolours, sketchbooks, copies after Old Master prints and preparatory drawings for his celebrated paintings; such as Crouching Tiger, 1839 (above). All these are evidence of his commitment to reaching the full expressive potential of his craft.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 17 July to 12 November 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici

Portrait of Doña María Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas, circa 1762 (above) by Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (1713–72), is one of several newly restored paintings from 18th-century New Spain (Mexico) that offer an insight into the cultural climate of the time. During this period, artists set up academies, worked with great versatility on portraits, casta paintings (depicting racially mixed families), and scenes for grand chapels and university halls. In an expression of local pride, they added to their canvases not just their signatures, but two Latin words: pinxit Mexici (painted in Mexico).
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 22 July 2018.



NEW YORK, New York
Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)

As Louis XIV would have wanted, his opulent palace of Versailles has stood the test of time and attracted many visitors since he moved his court there in 1682. Using the relocation as a starting point, this exhibition focuses on the following century of visits from royalty, ambassadors, artists, scientists and daytrippers up until 1789 and Louis XVI's forced move to Paris by the revolutionary mob. A wide variety of items, such as Fan with a View of the Château de Versailles, circa 1780–85 (above), give a glimpse of different experiences of Versailles and the impression the palace made.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 29 July 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination

Staged at The Met Fifth Avenue and at The Met Cloisters, this exhibition brings together Vatican vestments, medieval art and modern women's wear to investigate the influence of the high church on high fashion. Among the many world-famous designers featured are: Cristobal Balenciaga, Coco Chanel, Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana, Jean Paul Gaultier, Jeanne Lanvin, Yves Saint Laurent, Elsa Schiaparelli and Donatella Versace.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
(The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters)
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 10 May to 8 October 2018.

NEW YORK, New York
The Second Buddha: Master of Time

The legends of Padmasambhava, who is believed to have played a vital role in converting Tibet to Buddhism, see him overcome obstacles, liberate himself from life and death, and blur notions of time. Works from the 13th to the 20th century (and new interactive technology) tell the story of this key figure, hailed by Tibetans as 'The Second Buddha', with a focus on the links between past and future for establishing identity and projecting teachings forward for a more enlightened time.
Rubin Museum of Art
+1 212 620 5000
(www.rubinmuseum.org)
Until 7 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art
Although frightening, the deadly gorgon Medusa is often portrayed as beautiful and feminine rather than grotesque. This fascinating shift in visual representation first started in the 5th century BC, when other female mythical creatures, including sphinxes, sirens and Scylla, underwent a similar transformation. Art from the Classical world and beyond is used to explore the relationship between beauty and fear, and how the ancient femme fatale combined erotic desire, violence and death, and became a model for the late 19th-century reactions to women's empowerment.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 6 January 2019.


NEW YORK, New York
Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer

Real and mythical animals adorn a large number of luxury objects from late Imperial China. This exhibition takes a close look at Chinese decorative art, focusing on creatures that appear in silk and lacquer between the 13th and the 18th centuries. Dragons, unicorns, phoenixes, butterflies, lions and oxen all appear on robes, rank badges, tapestry panels used for decorating interiors, and an array of lacquer vessels produced by imperial workshops, including a fine Ming dynasty red lacquer box (above).
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 22 July 2018.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Cultures in the Crossfire: Stories from Syria and Iraq

Many spectacular ancient sites in Iraq and Syria, such as Nimrud, Aleppo and Ebla, have suffered greatly from being caught in the crossfire in recent and ongoing conflicts. This exhibition looks at the often deliberate destruction of cultural heritage and the work being done by the University of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Institute, and others in the Middle East to stop this devastation. It also celebrates the diversity of the area, with limestone funerary busts from ancient Palmyra, such as Mortuary Portrait of Yedi'at, 1st–2nd centuries AD (above), which combines Roman sculptural elements with local stylistic details. Also on show are Arabic manuscripts and works by contemporary Syrian artist Issam Kourbaj.
Penn Museum
+1 215 898 4000
(www.penn.musem)
Until 26 November 2018.

ST LOUIS, Missouri
Sunken Cities: Egypt's Lost Worlds

The touring exhibition showcasing finds from the lost Egyptian cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus makes its North American debut in St Louis. More than 250 remarkably well-preserved objects, recovered from beneath the waves between 1996 and 2012 by the French archaeologist Franck Goddio and his team, offer an insight into these two once thriving port cities on the Nile delta, which were lost to the sea by the 9th century AD. The exhibition uses exquisite metalwork, gold jewellery, stelae and statues to explore the richly interactive relationship between Greece and Egypt (conquered by Alexander the Great in 332 BC) and to shed light on the cult of Osiris, which was particularly popular in these cities.
Saint Louis Art Museum
+1 314 721 0072
(www.slam.org)
From 25 March to 9 September 2018.



SAN FRANCISCO, California
Truth and Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelites and the Old Masters

Edward Burne-Jones, who designed the tapestry Pomona (above), joined Dante Gabriel Rosetti, William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais to form the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848 . This was a rebellion against the aesthetic values of the Royal Academy and its first president Sir Joshua Reynolds. As the name suggests the Pre-Raphaelites looked for inspiration before the time of Raphael, in the masterpieces of medieval and Renaissance art for inspiration. Work by Italian Old Masters such as Fra Angelico, Botticelli (who was 'rediscovered' in England in the 19th century), as well as Raphael, and Veronese will be displayed alongside the sumptuous 19th-century works they influenced. The angular postures, symbolic detail and rich colour palettes of the Pre-Raphaelites also evoke early Netherlandish art, including panels by Van Eyck and Hans Memling, which Rossetti and Holman Hunt admired in Bruges in 1849.
Legion of Honor
+1 415 750 3600
(legionofhonor.famsf.org)
Until 30 September 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
To Dye For: Ikats from Central Asia

With their distinctive patterns and bright colours, Ikats have a wide appeal. In 2005, Oscar de la Renta helped secure their place in contemporary fashion by including the Central Asian designs in his collection. Others followed suit and the motifs soon spread to T-shirts, stationery and wallpaper. Ikat hangings and coats from Central Asia and designs by de la Renta are displayed together to investigate the original function of the fabrics and highlight their lasting appeal.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery
+1 202 633 1000
(www.freersackler.si.edu)
Until 29 July 2018.

WASHINGTON DC
The Prince and the Shah: Royal Portraits from Qajar Iran

Portraiture has long been used by the ruling elite to convey power, wealth and taste. In Persia (Iran) from 1779–1925, the Qajar dynasty commissioned images of themselves in monumental oil paintings, photographs and scaled lacquer works. These 19th- and early 20th-century portraits reveal a confluence of traditional Persian conventions and European elements during a period when the country was undergoing major political, social, and cultural transformations.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery
+1 202 633 1000
(www.freersackler.si.edu)
Until 5 August 2018.




WASHINGTON DC
Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice across Asia

Buddhist art from a diverse range of Asian countries has been brought together for this exhibition, which considers how sacred objects and artworks are an integral part of Buddhism. More than 250 remarkable artefacts, including a 14th-century, gilt-copper Buddha from central Tibet (above), are on display. They reveal the power they embody and the relationships between objects, people and ritual. This exhibition also contains two experiential spaces. One is the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room from the Alice S Kandell Collection, in which many objects are displayed as they would be in the shrine of a noble family.
Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
+1 202 633 1000
(asia.si.edu)

BELGIUM



BRUGES
Mummies in Bruges: Secrets of Ancient Egypt

Human and animal mummies, including the Mummy of Pawiamen, 700–650 BC (above), from the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden's collection are shown alongside statues, stelae, burial gifts, papyrus sheets from the Book of the Dead, magical amulets and scarabs, to bring to light ancient Egyptian ways of life, rituals, burial customs and beliefs about the afterlife. Scans of the mummies also virtually unwrap them to reveal the secrets of the mummification process.
Oud Sint-Jan Exhibition Centre
+32 50 47 61 00
(www.xpo-center-bruges.be)
Until 11 November 2018.
Until October 2020.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
High on Luxury: Lost Treasures from the Roman Empire

Some 90 objects – including goblets, dishes and statues – comprise the spectacular Berthouville Treasure. This set of 1st-2nd-century AD Roman silverware, weighing 25kg, was discovered in northwest France in 1830, where it lay hidden on the site of the burned down Temple of Mercury since the 3rd century. After four years of cleaning and restoration, these luxury goods are on display in an exhibition that indulges in the extravagances of the Roman Empire and lavish feasting.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptoteket
+45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.dk)
Until 2 September 2018.

FRANCE
LENS
The Rose Empire: Masterpieces of 19th-century Persian art

The Qajar dynasty ruled Persia (modern-day Iran) from 1786 and 1985. In this period prolific court artists created a wondrous array of art, using traditional techniques in painting, glasswork and metalwork. Over 400 works, many from private collections and on public view for the first time, are in a setting by Christian Lacroix designed to evoke the palace of Fath Ali Shah in Sulaymaniyah (r 1797–1834). As well as charting traditional practices, including drawing and calligraphy, by the rulers themselves, they reveal how Nasseredin Shah introduced photography in the 1840s and how changing Qajar styles still influence contemporary Iranian art.
Louvre Lens
+33 3 21 18 62 62
(www.louvrelens.fr)
Until 22 July 2018.

NICE
Matisse and Picasso: The Comedy of the Model

As part of Picasso-Méditerranée (an international programme of events, running from 2017 to 2019, to show Picasso's Mediterranean works) the Musée Matisse in Nice is staging an exhibition that explores the dialogue between these two rival artists, who were both drawn to the city's sunny coastal setting and the landscape around it in the 1940s. With a focus on the relationship between the artists and their models, through paintings, sculptures and their graphic works, together with letters, photographs of their studios and other archival material, this show draws attention to both the similarities and differences between Picasso and Matisse and their creative competitiveness.
Musée Matisse de Nice
+33 4 93 81 08 08
(www.musee-matisse-nice.org)
Until 29 September 2018.

PARIS
Neanderthal
Neanderthals have received some bad press since the first discovery of a skull in Germany's Neander valley in 1856, but recent research is continuing to transform our ideasabout this species. With Neanderthal remains on show, such as this 60,000-year-old skull (above) from La Chapelle-aux-Saints, this exhibition explores changing public perception, depictions in the arts and latest scientific investigations.
Musée de l'Homme
+33 1 44 05 72 72
(www.museedelhomme.fr)
Until 7 January 2019.

PARIS
The Epic of The Suez Canal: From the Pharaohs to the 21st century
The Suez Canal was constructed between 1859 and 1869 to connect the Mediterranean and the Red Sea. An impressive feat of engineering it has had an historic impact on travel and trade in the region. This exhibition explores the long history of the canal and related themes in Egypt, from the pharaohs up to the 2015 inauguration of the Suez Canal extension, through archaeological finds, photographs, scale models and archival film footage.
Institut du monde arabe
+33 1 40 51 38 38
(www.imarabe.org)
From 28 March to 5 August 2018.


PARIS
Delacroix (1798–1863)
For this comprehensive tour of the career of one of France's finest painters, more than 180 works by Eugène Delacroix are on show. They include his early works, exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1820, historic and mythological scenes, such as his Medée furieuse, 1838 (above), and his later religious and landscape compositions. The paintings reflect Delacroix's consciousness of his place in art history, pursuing individuality while at the same time following 16th- and 17th-century Flemish and Venetian artists.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 29 March to 23 July 2018.

PARIS
Guernica
On 26 April 1937, the Basque town of Guernica was destroyed by aerial bombing during the Spanish Civil War. Picasso created his painting Guernica for the Spanish Pavilion at the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne that same year. The vast and haunting monochrome canvas, which captures the chaos and violence of war, evoking pity and terror, has been reproduced across the world. The iconic painting is
on loan from the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía with a number of related sketches, and the exhibition tells the story of the creation of the work and the impact of the Spanish Civil War on Picasso.
Musée national Picasso-Paris
+33 1 85 56 00 36
(www.museepicassoparis.fr)
From 27 March to 29 July 2018.

PARIS
Le Monde vu d'Asie

Beautiful Asian cartographical works offer a different perspective of the world through the centuries. Paintings, prints, manuscripts, porcelain, jewellery and ivory from the 15th to the 20th centuries invite visitors to consider a geography that is not Eurocentric. Cosmographies, pilgrimages and spiritual images include such mythical places as Mount Meru, the sacred mountain at the centre of the Hindu universe, the Anavatapta Lake, which is the heart of the Buddhist world, and the Kunlun Mountains, where Chinese gods reside. These works reveal exchanges between the regions in Asia, and with Europe, and different attitudes towards colonisation, trade and globalisation.
Musée National des Arts Asiatiques – Guimet
+33 1 56 52 53 00
(www.guimet.fr)
Until 10 September 2018.

PARIS
In Society: Pastels in the Louvre from the 17th and 18th centuries

A long-term project has restored and researched the Louvre's collection of exceptionally fragile pastel works from the 17th and 18th centuries. Acknowledging this research, more than 120 of the pastels, mainly from the heyday of the medium in the 18th century, will be on display. Some of the pieces have an interesting history – they were plundered during the Second World War, for example, and then entrusted to the Louvre in 1949. These pastels are not merely colourful preparatory studies, but finished art works in their own right, many still with their original frame and glass. Highlights from France include Maurice Quentin de La Tour's 1748 portrait of the Marquise de Pompadour and Simon Bernard Lenoir's 1767 portrait of the actor Henri Louis Cain, known as Lekain (above). Reflecting the international aspect of the medium, works by Rosalba Carriera in Venice, Jean-Etienne Liotard in Geneva and John Russell in London are on show.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
Until 10 September 2018.

PARIS
Diego Giacometti at the Musée Picasso
When the Musée National Picasso -Paris opened its doors at the Hôtel Salé in October 1985, as well as masterpieces by Picasso, it also presented a special commission by Giacometti. The last before his death in July 1985, it encompasses some 50 exclusively created pieces of furniture: benches, chairs, tables and lamps. The exhibition tells the story of the bronze and resin objects, and how they reflect the Swiss artist's interest in botany and ancient Greek and Etruscan sources, with which, he said, he aimed to create a 'geometry in the air'.
Musée National Picasso-Paris
+33 1 85 56 00 36
(www.museepicassoparis.fr)
Until 4 November 2018.

GERMANY
BONN
Nazca – Divine Drawings: Archaeological Discoveries from Southern Peru

The Nazca desert in southern Peru is home to around 300 enormous mysterious geoglyphs. Known as the Nazca Lines, they were created between circa 200 BC and circa AD 650. Now, an array of extraordinary artefacts offers visitors a comprehensive look at the Nazca culture behind these famous lines etched into the desert. Grave goods from rich and vast burial complexes including vivid ceramic vessels decorated with images of flying hybrid creatures, and well-preserved, intricate, colourful textiles, give a glimpse of various aspects of life, death and ritual of the Nazca people.
Bundeskunsthalle
+49 228 91710
(www.bundeskunsthalle.de)
Until 16 September 2018.

NETHERLANDS


LEIDEN
200 Years Young

In 1818, Caspar Reuvens was appointed the world's first Professor of Archaeology at the University of Leiden. As well as doing research, he was asked by William I to put together an 'archaeological cabinet' and so it was that the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden (National Museum of Antiquities) was born. Now celebrating its 200th year, this jubilee exhibition presents a vast and varied selection of objects from the museum's collection, as well as those that have now moved on to other museums. These artefacts come from Ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome and the Near East, including a 6th-century BC kouros from Cyprus (above) and from archaeological finds in the Netherlands from digs, conducted by the museum since 1827, such as the prehistoric Ommerschans Sword, named after the town near which it was found.
Rijksmuseum van Oudheden
+ 31 071 5163 163
(www.rmo.nl)
Until 2 September 2018.

SPAIN
BILBAO
Chagall: The Breakthrough Years, 1911–1919

Like many artists, Marc Chagall (1887–1995) was drawn to Paris, where he experimented with colour, abstract and geometric form, and movement. He left Russia, arrived in the French capital in 1911 and stayed for three years. It had a lasting impact on him and he went on to combine traditional aspects of Russian folk art with progressive stylistic elements from the Parisian avant-garde, as more than 80 of his early paintings and drawings here reveal. His Paris sojourn was cut short when war broke out, preventing his return, when he was in Russia attending his sister's wedding. His frustration is symbolised in The Clock, 1914 (above). Subsequent works show him soul-searching, through self-portraits, the horrors of war and the new Soviet Union ushered in by the October Revolution.
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 2 September 2018.

MADRID
Victor Vasarely: The birth of Op Art

Tracing the evolution of the Hungarian artist Victor Vasarely (1908–97), this exhibition examines his important creative output in France and his role in developing post-war geometric abstraction and Op Art. Paintings by Vasarely also offer us a chance to reflect on his experimentation and his interest in a closer union between art and society.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
From 7 June to 9 September 2018.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
CRANBORNE
The Fate We Bring Ourselves: Greek Myths Unleashed Ancient Greek myths are full of personality clashes, plots, jealousies, intriguing liaisons, scheming and power struggles. Their stories have an enduring appeal but, in this Crick Crack Club event at the Earthouse, three familiar legends are cast in a new light, as renowned storyteller Ben Haggarty presents remixed, expanded and explicit versions based on his extensive research.
18 August
Cranborne Earthouse
crickcrackclub.com/earthousecranborne

LONDON
Displaying Egypt

Since the British Museum first opened in 1759, its displays of Egyptian artefacts have attracted numerous visitors. But how should Egypt, of all periods, be represented in the museum in the future and at other institutions across the world? This year, the British Museum's annual Egyptological colloquium brings together international experts, including curators, archaeologists, museologists and historians, who will present papers on themes related to displaying Egyptian art. These include the influence of collecting, acquisition histories, the relationship with research and with artefacts in store, and also the impact of visual and design trends.
19–20 July
British Museum
www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/events_calendar/events

Festival of Ideas
The Royal Academy of Arts is holding its first Festival of Ideas, with 10 days of talks and other events addressing creativity, culture and critical thinking planned for September. Many of the talks will take place in the Benjamin West Lecture Theatre, a new addition to the RA's complex, with family workshops running in the new Clore Learning Centre. The inaugural programme features speakers from the fields of art, architecture, design, dance, music and literature. They include: Goldie, Tamara Rojo, Amanda Levete, Es Devlin, Howard Jacobson, and Gilbert & George.
7–16 September
Royal Academy of Arts
roy.ac/festivalofideas

Work in focus:
Portrait of TS Eliot by Wyndham Lewis

In this talk, Dr Nathan Waddell, Senior Lecturer in the Department of English Literature at the University of Birmingham and Chairperson of the Wyndham Lewis Society, delves into the controversy behind the artist, writer, and critic Wyndham Lewis and his relationship with his friend, the modernist poet TS Eliot. He examines why Lewis' 1938 portrait of Eliot – one of his key paintings of the inter-war period, highly rated not only by the sitter but by other high-profile artists, such as Augustus John – was rejected by the RA's Summer Exhibition judging panel that year.
Friday 13 July, 11am–12pm
Benjamin West Lecture Theatre,
Royal Academy of Arts
www.royalacademy.org.uk/event/work-in-focus-portrait-of-t-s-eliot-by-wyndham-lewis


London Art Week
London celebrates its place in the art world this summer as London Art Week returns, with leading galleries, dealers and auction houses around Mayfair and St James's hosting exhibitions, talks and events. There will be new discoveries, as well as works on the market for the first time in decades. The exhibitions will feature Classical antiquities, Old Masters, post-Impressionist paintings, and more. Among art dealers taking part are Gallery Desmet, with a Roman relief of Dionysos; Forge and Lynch, with an Attic black figure amphora (above); and Didier Aaron, with Hubert Robert's drawing, Two figures conversing before the Temple of the Sybil, circa 1759 (above).
Multiple venues
Until 6 July
www.londonartweek.com

OXFORD
Ancient Britain and Classical Art

The 2018 instalment of the annual Classical Art Research Centre workshop investigates the complex relationship between Classical Graeco-Roman artistic traditions around the Mediterranean and continental Europe, and the visual culture of ancient Britain. Examples from the pre-Roman Iron Age, via the Roman province of Britannia – such as the 4th-century AD, Romano-British mosaic from Littlecote Roman villa, Berkshire, (above) – to the early Anglo-Saxon period will be examined. Places at the workshop are free but pre-booking is essential at:
carc@classics.ox.ac.uk.
27–28 September
Ioannou Centre
www.carc.ox.ac.uk/events

ONLINE
HENI Talks

Go online at any time for a range of fascinating short videos (each one is 8–16 minutes long) covering the riches of visual culture on the free platform HENI Talks. The website, launched on 25 April this year, sets out to make art of all kinds more accessible using a range of contributors discussing leading figures and works in some of the world's best collections. The first batch of videos feature artists, curators, and historians including: Sir Peter Blake, Jeremy Deller, Damien Hirst, Amanda Levete, Iwona Blazwick, Tristram Hunt, Caroline Campbell, Julia Farley and Bettany Hughes.
www.henitalks.com

 

 

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