Events


UNITED KINGDOM


BATH

George Shaw: A Corner of a Foreign Field
A council estate in Coventry may be an unconventional subject for a painting, but it is one that George Shaw has embraced in his hyper-realistic works, attentively rendered, not in oil, watercolour, or acrylic, but in Humbrol, a thick, quick-drying enamel paint that is more commonly used for decorating model aeroplanes and cars. Shaw, who grew up on the Tile Hill estate in Coventry in the 1970s–80s, captured overlooked scenes around the estate, abandoned garages and surrounding neglected woodland. Work from 1996 to the present-day is on show in this exhibition that brings together 20 of his paintings, such as Ash Wednesday 8.30am, 2004–05 (above) and 50 of his drawings. Together, these make a compelling case for the presence and significance of urban landscape in contemporary art.
Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388569
(www.holburne.org)
Until 6 May 2019.


BATH
The Triumph of Pan

In this year's National Gallery Masterpiece Tour Poussin's painting, The Triumph of Pan, 1636 (above) will travel around England. Its first destination is the Victoria Art Gallery in Bath, where it will join works from Bath & North East Somerset Council's collection for an exploration of the lasting impact of the Classical world on art and design and for a reflection on the rich Roman and Georgian heritage of the city of Bath. Also featured in the travelling exhibition is work by Thomas Malton, Jean Claude Nattes and Grayson Perry. Later this year Poussin's masterpiece will go on show at York Art Gallery and then at Auckland Castle in Co Durham.
Victoria Art Gallery
+44 (0)1225 477233
(victoriagal.org.uk)
From 11 April to 7 July 2019.

CAMBRIDGE
Whistler & Nature

Oscar Wilde once commented that James McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) was the first artist to conjure up the famous London fog on canvas. His atmospheric scenes capture the intangible mists of the city, as well as of the countryside. This exhibition showcases Whistler's paintings and other works, including a sketchbook, which explore the relationship between the natural world and human activity in the city, on the coast, in the field and in the garden.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
Until 17 March 2019.



CAMBRIDGE

Making a Nation: Money, image and power in Tudor and Stuart England
While ruled by Tudor and Stuart monarchs, England went through many dramatic changes, not just in the ruling dynasties and in politics, but also in religion and culture. Coins and medals issued during these periods offer an insight into history, since they commemorate important events, provide official images of kings and queens – one gold sovereign (above) bears a striking image of Elizabeth I (1558–1603) – and also shed light on the art, trade and the economy during times of civil war, and the union of England and Scotland.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 26 March to 30 June 2019.

CAMBRIDGE
Oscar Murillo
In
his first solo show at a UK public institution since 2013, the London-based Columbian artist Oscar Murillo (born 1986) is showcasing a new body of work encompassing painting, video, installation and live performance, and extending far beyond the limits of the gallery walls. The range of media and this multifaceted approach enhances the exhibition's sense of exploration of displacement and other topical themes such as the economic and human impact of globalisation.
Kettle's Yard
+44 (0)1223 748100
(kettlesyard.co.uk)
From 9 April to 23 June 2019.

EDINBURGH
Ancient Egypt Rediscovered

After undergoing a major, 15-year-long transformation, the National Museum of Scotland has opened three new permanent galleries displaying more than 1500 objects, many on view for the first time. This coincides with the 200th anniversary of the first Ancient Egyptian artefacts entering the museum's collections. The Ancient Egypt Rediscovered gallery offers visitors the chance to delve into 3000 years of Ancient Egyptian history and also to learn about the work of Scottish archaeologists, such as Alexander Henry Rhind (1833–63). Highlights include: a well-preserved painted, sycamore-fig wood funerary canopy from circa 9 BC (above), which was excavated by Rhind; a gold ring bearing the name of Nefertiti, and the only double coffin found in Egypt. The second new gallery, Exploring East Asia, displays objects from the diverse cultures, traditions and histories of China, Japan and Korea. Among the varied exhibits are: Chinese oracle bones from 1200 BC; an 18th-century headdress made of kingfisher feathers; rare military outfits and Japanese woodblock prints. The third new gallery, Art of Ceramics, looks at Ancient Greek pottery, royal tableware and contemporary sculpture, as well as the use of ceramics beyond art, such as in 19th-century false teeth and, during the 20th century, heat-protective coatings for rockets.
National Museum of Scotland
+44 (0)300 123 6789
(nms.ac.uk)
Ongoing.

EDINBURGH
Andy Warhol and Eduardo Paolozzi: I want to be a machine

In a 1963 interview the Pop Artist Andy Warhol (1928–87) stated: 'I want to be a machine' signalling his interest in automation, mechanical processes, and machines, which was shared by his contemporary Eduardo Paolozzi (1924–2005) – as this exhibition shows. Working on either side of the Atlantic, both artists drew inspiration from the mass-produced images of popular and consumer culture, and both embraced the potential of screen-printing from photographs as a more mechanised means of producing works of art. Paolozzi's work reflects his fascination with the relationship between people and machines, and the beauty within machine forms.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 2 June 2019.


EDINBURGH
Charles II: Art & Power

With the Restoration in 1660 came a renewed interest in the arts in Britain after years of oppressive puritanical Cromwellian rule. Charles II and his court became great patrons of the arts, which not only helped to adorn the royal apartments, but also reinforced the king's position and glorified the monarchy. Portraits, including Peter Lely's Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, circa 1665, depicted as Minerva (above), Old Master paintings, tapestries, furniture and other objects embellished in silver gilt, reveal how the arts helped to re-establish the Stuart monarchy.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
Until 2 June 2019.

HEREFORD
Creatures of the Mappa Mundi

Hereford Cathedral's Mappa Mundi, the largest surviving medieval world map, shows the world as it was known around 1300, with strange figures based on exaggerated, often fanciful, accounts from travellers, and myths about far-flung lands. Inspired by this, in a special textile commission, artist Yinka Shonibare has depicted creatures from the map – such as satyrs and giants – on a series of hangings that feature vibrant Dutch wax fabrics. The project addresses, in the words of the artist, 'two of the most pressing concerns of our time: environmental protection and immigration'. Different groups from across Herefordshire have made a vital contribution to the work by sewing Shonibare's designs while engaging in discussion on these key themes.
Hereford Cathedral
+44 (0)1432 374200
(herefordcathedral.org)
Until 1 June 2019.

LONDON
Edvard Munch: love and angst

The work of the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) can be recognised by most – especially his iconic 1895 painting The Scream, which is even today referenced in the design of an emoji as a short-hand expression of fear. This expression can be seen elsewhere in the artist's work, including a rare black-and-white lithograph version (above). The large selection of prints charts his mastery of this artform and his acute rendering of a broad spectrum of feelings. Many of the works are on loan from Norway's Munch Museum, and – for the first time in the UK – Munch's original matrices used to transfer ink on to paper are on show. These are normally discarded, but Munch kept all of his: three are shown next to their corresponding prints. Among them is Head by Head, 1905, which reflects the complexity of human relationships.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
From 11 April until 21 July 2019.



LONDON

Reimagining Captain Cook: Pacific Perspectives
Contemporary art and historic artefacts have been brought together to re-examine Captain Cook's relationship with the people of the Pacific and the legacy of his voyages, some 250 years after he first set sail. The various ways
Cook is remembered in Australia, Aotearoa (New Zealand), New Caledonia, Hawaii, Vanuatu and Tahiti, as well as attitudes towards the explorer in Britain, are explored through a range of objects. From Hawaii, an 18th-century feathered cloak (above) is on display along with a colourful 1970s' shirt featuring images made by artists travelling with Cook. Acquired especially for this exhibition, it is the first Hawaiian shirt to enter the British Museum's collection. Other highlights include: contemporary works by Māori artists such as Lisa Reihana, whose Taking Possession, Lono, is inspired by 19th-century French wallpaper and reimagines early encounters between Pacific Islanders and Europeans.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
Until 4 August 2019.



LONDON

Harald Sohlberg: Painting Norway
To mark the 150th anniversary of his birth, Dulwich Picture Gallery is presenting the first exhibition devoted to landscape painter Harald Sohlberg (1869–1935) outside his native Norway. More than 90 works and archival material span the entirety of his career from his earliest output as a 20-year-old to the last year of his life, showing his enduring love of the Nordic landscape, particularly the Rondane mountains, the significance of colour and symbolism in his work, and other influences such as Norwegian Naturalism and Neo-Romanticism. Among the atmispheric works on show is Winter Night in the Mountains, 1914 (above), which took 14 years to complete.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
Until 2 June 2019.

LONDON
Sorolla: Spanish master of light
Portraits, landscapes, seascapes, garden views and other works by Spanish painter Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (1863–1923) have been brought together for the most complete exhibition of his paintings outside Spain. As there are few works by Sorolla in UK public collections, this is a rare chance to see his evocative images of his native country. This is the first show in the UK dedicated to Valencia-born Sorolla since 1908, when he mounted his own show of work in London's Grafton Galleries. In the previous decade he had sent his vast canvases exploring social themes to major exhibitions around the world. They are now on show along with his sunny depictions of bathers and historic Spanish sites, such as Burgos cathedral under Snow, 1910 (above), and Monastery of San Juan de los Reyes. Both bear witness to his careful use of light.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 18 March to 7 July 2019.



LONDON

Only Human: Photographs by Martin Parr
Photographer Martin Parr is best known for his colourful images of the public that offer a snapshot of everyday life and leisure activities at home and abroad. This exhibition also addresses the complicated issue of national identity. Britishness, particularly in the time of Brexit, is examined through the images that show the British abroad, including soldiers in army camps. The rituals, ceremonies and traditions of the British establishment are recorded and famous figures, such as Tracey Emin, Vivienne Westwood, Pelé, and The Perry Family – Grayson, Philippa and daughter Florence, 2012 (above) are pictured. The exhibition also features intriguing self-portraits of Photo Escultura. Not seen in the UK before, this is a group of shrine-like carved photo-sculptures, based on Parr's likeness and commissioned from the last remaining traditional maker in Mexico City.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0)20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
From 7 March to 27 May 2019.

LONDON
Anish Kapor
Pitzhanger Manor, the country home of the Regency architect and collector Sir John Soane, set in what was once rural Ealing, re-opens on 16 March after a three-year-long £12-million conservation and restoration project. The house has been returned to Soane's original design, with later architectural additions and extensions removed, and key structural and decorative elements reinstated. Built between 1800 and 1804, the manor has an adjoining gallery, added in the 1930s, which will now house a programme of exhibitions that showcase contemporary artists, architects and designers, and offer a fresh look at Soane's legacy. The inaugural exhibition presents the work of Anish Kapoor in a series of his sculptures that invite viewers to reconsider their perceptions of form and space, reflecting Soane's use of mirrors and light to manipulate space, which he did so successfully in his Lincoln's Inn home (now Sir John Soane's Museum).
Pitzhanger Manor
(0)20 8825 9808
(www.pitzhanger.org.uk)
From 16 March to
18 August 2019.

LONDON
'He has been here and fired a gun': Turner, Constable and the Royal Academy
On Varnishing Day, all the artists exhibiting at the Royal Academy's Summer Exhibition were given the opportunity to make last-minute adjustments to their works. In 1832, it was a particularly momentous occasion because Turner's seascape Helvoetsluys – the City of Utrecht, 64, Going to sea (above) was hanging next to Constable's The Opening of Waterloo Bridge, a painting of the Thames with many red flecks. In a provocative response to his rival's work, Turner allegedly added a small blob of red paint to his seascape, which he turned into a buoy. The account of this event seems to have a lasting popularity, and even featured in Mike Leigh's 2014 biopic Mr Turner, starring Timothy Spall. The paintings have now been reunited and displayed, prompting viewers to make up their own minds about the work of these two famous artists and their rivalry.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 31 March 2019.

LONDON
The Renaissance Nude
Both live models and Classical sculpture were an important part of the training of the Renaissance artists and ultimately led to the prominence of the nude in the art of 15th- and 16th-century Europe, in both secular and sacred works. Organised by the Royal Academy and the J Paul Getty Museum, where it was first on show, this exhibition examines the status of the nude across a broad range of media, paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings and illuminated manuscripts, between 1400 and 1530. It looks at how the emergence of this pivotal and popular genre changed European art and how the nude in art was shaped by spiritual beliefs, humanist culture and new artistic attitudes. Highlights from Italy include Titian's Venus Rising from the Sea (Venus Anadyomene) circa 1520 (above) which is an example of how the nude was used in images inspired by Classical antiquity and mythology. Master works from northern European artists, such as Dürer, Cranach the Elder and Jan Gossaert, are also on view.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
From 3 March to 2 June 2019.

LONDON
Sixty Years
This year a range of monographic exhibitions and displays across Tate's sites will celebrate women artists. Drawing on the Tate's own collection, an exhibition at Millbank presents 60 works, including recent commissions, by female artists working in Britain over the past six decades. The pieces showcase the diversity of their output, whether in painting, photography, sculpture, drawing or film, and chart the key movements and debates in art during that time. Bridget Riley, Antea Hamilton, Tomma Abts, Rachel Whiteread, Gillian Wearing, Sarah Lucas and Rose Wiley are among the female artists featured.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 22 April.


LONDON
Elizabethan Treasures: Miniatures by Hilliard and Oliver
Miracles of fine detail on a tiny scale, miniature paintings were much admired by monarchs, courtiers and the middle classes during the 16th and 17th centuries. England was particularly renowned for this art form, with the two artists Exeter-born Nicholas Hilliard (1547–1619) and French-born Isaac Oliver (1565–1617) surpassing all others. Not just exquisite portraits, the size of miniatures makes them into intriguing objects that could be worn openly around the neck, or secretly concealed. This exhibition examines the portrait miniatures of Hilliard and Oliver that earned them international fame and offers us an insight into relationships, identity and visual culture in Elizabethan and Jacobean society. Portraits of leading figures of the day, such as Hilliard's exquisite Queen Elizabeth I, 1572 (above), James I, Sir Francis Drake and Sir Walter Raleigh are some of the famous names on show.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0)20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
From 21 February to 19 May 2019.

LONDON
Don McCullin
Ever since he started taking photographs in the 1950s, Sir Don McCullin has dramatically captured landscapes, still life, and scenes of conflict around the world on film. This major retrospective presents more than 250 photographs, all printed by McCullin in his own darkroom, ranging from his first images taken around Finsbury Park and his forays into photojournalism, to his more recent powerful work documenting the deliberate destruction of ancient Syrian sites, such as The theatre of the Roman city of Palmyra, partly destroyed by Islamic State fighters, 2017 (above). Some tools of the trade are also on display, including a helmet and a Nikon camera which was hit by a bullet in Cambodia; these highlight the great risk often involved in this important work.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 5 February to 6 May 2019.

LONDON
Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory
Working in the early 20th century, the French painter Pierre Bonnard (1867–1947) often created his colourful compositions from memory, imbuing them with a sense of fleeting melancholy, or of a moment lost in time. This show considers not only Bonnard's intimate domestic scenes, featuring his wife, and his unconventional landscapes dense with foliage, but also more overlooked aspects of his oeuvre, involving his regular trips around France, his way of working on different subjects side by side, and his reaction to the two world wars. Highlights include Studio with Mimosa, 1939–46 (above), which reflects his move towards abstraction later in his life.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
From 23 January to 6 May 2019.

LONDON
Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams
The House of Dior has created magnificent gowns for members of the Royal Family and for celebrities since 1947. This exhibition looks at the work of French designer Christian Dior and the House's six subsequent artistic directors (Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons, and Maria Grazia Chiuri) through rare Haute Couture garments, photography, film and vintage perfume (including Miss Dior, launched in 1947 alongside the very first show). The exhibits reflect the importance of flowers in Dior's designs, as well as other sources of inspiration, including global travel and 18th-century decorative arts. Of particular interest is the section charting Dior's relationship with British manufacturers, such as Dents the glovemakers, established in 1777, and Lyle & Scott, the Scottish knitwear firm set up in 1874; and for notable clients, such as Nancy Mitford, Margot Fonteyn and Princess Margaret, who wore a dress designed by Dior for her official 21st birthday portrait (above) taken by Cecil Beaton (1904–80).
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 2 February to 14 July 2019.


LONDON

Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs
The royal families of Russia and Britain are inextricably linked, and a rich array of objects in the Royal Collection explores the long history of relations between the two countries, stretching from Peter the Great's visit to London in 1698 to the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II – a cousin of George V, to whom he bore a close physical resemblance.
A century on from the Russian Revolution and the execution of the Romanovs, this poignant exhibition brings together both diplomatic gifts and personal family mementoes, highlighting the close bond between the two dynasties. Exquisite treasures by Fabergé, photographs, archival documents, paintings and portraits – such as Sir Godfrey Kneller's 1698 portrayal of Peter I, Tsar of Russia, and Laurits Regner Tuxen's The Family of Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia, 1896 (above) – all unite to tell the story of these momentous historic events and family meetings.
Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)303 123 7301
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
From 9 November 2018 to
28 April 2019.



LONDON

The Sun: Living With Our Star
Adding rays of light and heat to the winter days, the Science Museum is exploring our vital relationship with the sun, which is essential to the existence of life on this planet. Archaeological artefacts provide an insight into ancient beliefs about this bright celestial body and show how people used mirrors to harness its powers to light fires. Scientific tools made over centuries will be on display, including an astronomical spectroscope used to identify helium 150 years ago, and the original orrery (a device made for and named after Charles Earl, 4th Earl of Orrery in 1712) which demonstrates how the earth and moon move around the sun. Observational images, like James Nasmyth's sunspot paintings and Elizabeth Beckley's astronomical photographs, capture the beauty of the sun, while the findings of research into powerful magnetic solar storms reveals its dark side. The exhibition also looks at upcoming solar missions.
Science Museum
+44 (0)333 241 4000
(www.sciencemuseum.org.uk)
Until 6 May 2019.

NORWICH
Ken Kiff: The Sequence

Ken Kiff started his vast series The Sequence in 1971 and worked on it intermittently until his death in 2001. The result is a set of almost 200 acrylic paintings on paper, 60 of which will be hung together in the largest-ever display of works from The Sequence. They track Kiff's development in interconnected themes and a blend of abstract and figurative imagery, and pinpoint the place of the series in his oeuvre. The artist's compositions draw on everyday life, his personal experience of analysis – as seen in Talking with a psychoanalyst: night sky, circa 1975–80 (above) – and myths, as well as folktales from a range of cultures.
Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
+44 (0)1603 593199
(www.scva.ac.uk)
Until 23 April 2019.



STOW-ON-THE-WOLD
From Genesis to Nemesis

Around 30 new works by Royal Academician and former Head of Painting at the RA Schools, Mick Rooney, are on show in his fifth solo exhibition. His highly inventive, colourful paintings give a glimpse of his rich imagination, inhabited by fantastical figures, as can be seen in The Famous Siren Choir, 2018 (above). In his work Rooney sets out to explore the mythologies, neuroses, secrets and dreams that lurk deep in the subconscious of society today.
Fosse Gallery
+44 (0)1451 831319
(www.fossegallery.com)
From 4 March to 23 March 2019.


WAKEFIELD
Magdalene Odundo: The Journey of Things

For her burnished ceramics, Magdalene Odundo has drawn inspiration from artistic traditions across the world, stretching back some 3000 years. In her quest to learn more about ceramic arts and crafts, she travelled widely, in Africa, in Kenya, Uganda and Nigeria, and in Asia, Central America and Europe. These journeys have made their mark on Odundo's own visual language. Her large, often asymmetrical, vessels, with striking silhouettes that evoke human forms, are often glazed in dense black – as in Untitled, 1989 (above) – and bright orange. Her distinctive pieces are on show alongside objects chosen by the artist for the role they played in inspiring her work. They include Ancient Egyptian and Greek pots, ritual sculpture from Africa, and British studio pottery by Lucy Rie. The show also explores the artist's interest in diasporic identity, the human body and the role of objects in intercultural relationships – all of which inform and influence her work.
The Hepworth Wakefield
+44 (0)1924 247360
(www.hepworthwakefield.org)
Until 2 June 2019.

WINCHESTER
Elizabeth Blackadder: From the Artist's Studio

As the first woman to be elected to both the Royal Scottish Academy and the Royal Academy of Arts, and holder of the title Her Majesty's Painter and Limner in Scotland, Dame Elizabeth Blackadder, who was born in Falkirk in 1931, has enjoyed a distinguished career. This exhibition, organised by Hampshire Cultural Trust, presents her varied works by covering the entirety of her career from its roots in the 1950s. Early drawings are on display along with more recent experiments in colour and space. Still lifes in oil, prints of cats, etchings – based on her travels in Italy and Japan – and botanical watercolours reflect the artist's interests over the decades. One of the highlights is a tapestry from the Fleming-Wyfold Art Foundation featuring Elizabeth Blackadder's beautiful irises (above) from 1987.
The Gallery, Winchester Discovery Centre, Winchester until 20 March.
The Willis Museum, Basingstoke from 29 March to 12 June 2019.
(www.hampshireculture.org.uk)

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Graciela Iturbide's Mexico

Born the oldest of 13 children in Mexico City in 1942, photographer Graciela Iturbide has spent the decades since the late 1970s capturing scenes of her country through her lens. The photographs highlight the beauty and deep complexities of her homeland, showing both the diversity and inequality of Mexican society. Nearly 140 photographs explore rich rituals and the relationship between human activity and the natural world, life in town and country, and indigenous and Spanish cultures. One of her striking images is a gelatin silver print, Birds on the Post, Highway/Pájaros en el poste, Carretera, Guanajuato, México, 1990 (above).
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 12 May 2019.

CHICAGO, Illinois
Conserving Photographs

Photographs, particularly historic ones, require careful conservation. Unsuitable storage conditions, careless handling and flaws in the chemistry of developed prints can all lead to their deterioration. This exhibition draws attention to the vital work conservators do to protect fragile photographs, with artificially aged samples to show
the effects of light on dyes, while juxtaposed copies of the same image demonstrate the potential effects of aging and poor storage. The variety of tools is explained, with a special focus on how modern treatments rely on scientific research as well as developments in the understanding of artistic intent.
Art Institute of Chicago
+1 312 443 3600
(www.artic.edu)
Until 28 April 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
Spectacular Mysteries: Renaissance Drawings Revealed

Despite the proliferation and sheer sophistication of Italian Renaissance drawings, many of them retain an element of mystery, with questions remaining about their purpose, their subjects, and even the artists behind them. Detailing the research into these questions, this exhibition investigates some stunning drawings selected from the Getty's own and from private collections, that were made at a time when increasing patronage of paintings, sculpture and architecture led to the spread of artists' studios and the development of robust production processes for drawings. To help in the attribution of works, some drawings can be compared stylistically to others. This was the case for Michelangelo's Study of a Mourning Woman, circa 1500–05 (above), acquired by the Getty in 2016, which exhibits his characteristic penwork and his handling of drapery. Inscriptions may offer clues, too, but, as the exhibition cautions, inaccurate attributions might have been made by optimistic past owners. Linking a drawing to a completed painting, sculpture or print can also shed some light on the sitter or subject and the work's purpose.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu/museum/)
Until 28 April 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
Monumental Journey: The Daguerreotypes of Girault de Prangey

Since the 19th century many sites in the Eastern Mediterranean have undergone great changes due to climate change, urbanisation and human conflict. The innovative work of French photographer Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (1804–92) offers much more than a snapshot of how they appeared, when he travelled throughout the region in 1842–45, producing more than 1000 daguerreotypes. A true pioneer, Girault used an oversize, custom-made camera to take the earliest surviving photographs of Greece, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey and the city of Jerusalem. His images, which consist of at least six different formats including horizontal panoramas, make up the largest known extant group of daguerreotypes from this period, yet they were never exhibited in his lifetime and were largely forgotten by the world until they began to appear at auction in 2003. Some 120 of these ground-breaking works will be on show in this exhibition that also highlights how Girault was ahead of his time in his meticulous archiving of his images in custom-built wooden boxes.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 12 May 2019.


NEW YORK, New York
I n Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met

Since the early days of the Met, Dutch Golden Age paintings have been an important feature of the museum's collection. Stunning 17th-century paintings by the likes of Rembrandt, Hals and Vermeer were part of the Met's founding purchase in 1871, and the museum has since acquired many more. Some 67 works from the permanent collections are on show, demonstrating both the refined skill of the Dutch artists and illustrating the key concerns of the day, such as religion. Landscapes, portraits, still lifes, and comic scenes all appear, as do paintings of women observed in everyday domestic settings, a major theme in 17th-century Dutch art best exemplified by Vermeer. Rembrandt is central to the exhibition, and his influence on his students, and other artists, is explored. Rembrandt's Portrait of Gerard de Lairesse, 1665–67, is juxtaposed alongside Lairesse's Apollo and Aurora, 1671 (above), which evoke some of the tensions between realism and idealism at the time.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 4 October 2020.

NEW YORK, New York
Nedjemankh and His Gilded Coffin
Nedjemankh was a high-ranking Egyptian priest of the ram-headed god Heryshef of Herakleopolis in upper Egypt. When he died in the 1st century BC he was buried in a spectacular, richly decorated, gilded coffin. Recently acquired by the Met, it is now the centrepiece of an exhibition that brings together other artefacts from the museum's extensive Egyptian collections, adding detail, setting his role as a priest, putting his burial and the ornamentation of his coffin in context. The show examines how the coffin's scenes and texts, in thick gesso relief, protect and guide Nedjemankh as he journeyed into the afterlife. The use of gold, which assists with rebirth in the next life, contrasts with the thin sheets of silver foil on the interior of the lid. This pairing is associated with the flesh and bones of the gods, the sun and the moon, and the eyes
of Heryshef.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 21 April 2019.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
Early Rubens

When he returned to Antwerp in 1608, after a period of study in Italy, Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640) established himself in his hometown by securing commissions for religious paintings for the city's churches, as well as for dramatic scenes based on Classical antiquity, such as The Dream of Silenus, 1610–12 (above) and the Bible, for private patrons. Organised by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Art Gallery of Ontario (where it will be on show 12 October 2019–5 January 2020), this exhibition brings together paintings and works on paper to chart the development of Rubens' career between 1609 and 1621. It explores how Antwerp, during its Golden Age, played its part as he cemented his position as one of the greats of Baroque art, and examines his bold handling of startling subjects.
Legion of Honor
+1 415 750 3600
(legionofhonor.famsf.org)
From 6 April 6 to 8 September 2019.

VERO BEACH, Florida
Michael Craig-Martin: Present Sense

In the second annual exhibition at the Windsor, part of a three-year curatorial partnership with London's Royal Academy of Arts, the work of Royal Academician Michael Craig-Martin is on show. It includes prints and sculpture as well as his characteristic brightly coloured paintings, including Untitled (lightbulb blue), 2017 (above) and four new ones, completed in 2018, reflecting the artist's interest in the everyday, and, increasingly, technological objects of our time, such as laptops, iPhones, and wireless headphones.
The Gallery at Windsor
+1 772 388 4071
(www.windsorflorida.com)
From 29 January to 25 April 2019.

AUSTRALIA


CANBERRA
Love & Desire: Pre-Raphaelite Masterpieces from the Tate

Full of vibrant colour with rich layers of detail and symbolism, the works of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood shirked the norms of the art establishment of the time by evoking the early Renaissance. For their subject matter, these rebellious young British artists looked not to contemporary society, but to written works and other sources, and had a penchant for the great love stories of history and literature. Major loans from the Tate's leading Pre-Raphaelite collection form the bulk this survey of the 19th-century art movement, which offers a rare chance to see these famous works in Australia. Highlights of the exhibition include John Everett Millais' Ophelia, 1852, and John William Waterhouse's The Lady of Shallot, 1888 (above).
National Gallery of Australia
+61 2 6240 6411
(nga.gov.au)
From 14 December 2018 to
28 April 2019.

AUSTRIA


VIENNA
Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures

Since 2012, the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna has invited various prominent cultural figures to work with museum curators to present a personal selection of objects and artworks, which will offer a new perspective on their impressive collections of more than 4 million objects. For the third instalment of these exhibitions, Texan cult film director Wes Anderson and the writer and illustrator Juman Malouf (above) have brought together more than 400 objects, which include artefacts from Ancient Egypt – such as the 4th-century BC shrew (spitzmaus) mummy (that lends its name to the exhibition) – and from Greece and Rome, Old Master paintings, coins, musical instruments, armour, natural history specimens and much more.
Kunsthistorisches Museum
+43 1 525240
(www.khm.at)
Until 28 April 2019.

BELGIUM


BRUGES
Mummies in Bruges: Secrets of Ancient Egypt

In this exhibition, human and animal mummies (some of which have been scanned) from the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden's collection are on show alongside statues, stelae, burial gifts, papyri from the Book of the Dead, magical amulets, scarabs and compelling painted golden mummy masks (above), all of which shed light on Ancient Egyptian ways of life, their rituals, their burial customs, and their beliefs about the afterlife.
Oud Sint-Jan Exhibition Centre
+32 50 47 61 00
(www.xpo-center-bruges.be)
Until 1 September 2019.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
Perfect Poses?

Carl Jacobsen (1842–1914), the founder of Copenhagen's Glyptotek, had a keen interest in 19th-century French sculpture, which was shared by Calouste Gulbenkian (1869–1955), founder of the eponymous museum in Lisbon, where this exhibition was on show until February. Drawing from both collections, Perfect Poses? presents an array of sculpture from the period between the French Revolution in 1789 and the start of the First World War in 1914, focusing, as the questioning title suggests, on the poses of the pieces. Sculptors Aristide Maillol, Auguste Rodin and Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux feature in this exploration of what body language can reveal about love, life and death.
NY Carlsberg Glyptotek
+45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
From 1 March to 16 July 2019.

FRANCE
PARIS
Tutankhamun, Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh

The most spectacular archaeological discovery of the 20th century was undoubtedly that of Tutankhamun's tomb, which was full of 'wonderful things' in the words of Egyptologist Howard Carter who found it in 1922. Now, more than 150 of these truly 'wonderful things' are going on show in Paris, for an impressive display that not only highlights their exquisite beauty and craftsmanship, but also sets out to explain their ritual significance. Gold jewellery, sculpture and ceremonial artefacts help trace Tutankhamun's journey from death into everlasting life. More than 50 of the artefacts are on view for the first time outside Egypt.
Grande Halle de la Villette
+33 1 40 03 75 75
(expo-toutankhamon.fr)
From 23 March to 15 September 2019.

PARIS
Liturgical Textiles of the Byzantine Tradition from Romania
Part of the France-Romania Season 2019, this exhibition celebrates the exceptional Romanian collections
of Byzantine embroideries and highlights their importance in both Romanian and world heritage. The centrepiece is the battle flag of St George, offered to the Zograf Monastery on Mount Athos by Stephen the Great of Moldavia (1457–1504), which came into French possession, was presented to Romania in 1917, and is now back in Paris on loan. Some of the other extraordinary works from the mid-15th to the mid-17th centuries include the beautiful vestments of bishops, priests, and deacons, embroidered in the Byzantine tradition, and royal tomb covers that incorporate portraiture.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 17 April to 29 July 2019.

PARIS
Archaeology goes Graphic

The latest offering in the Petite Galerie, the Louvre's space devoted to art and cultural education for all, examines the relationship between archaeology and the art of the comic book, known in France as 'the 9th art'. With archaeological discoveries, such as a terracotta nude from 2340–1500 BC (above), and comics and drawings, visitors can learn about the work of the archaeologist from the 19th century onwards. Sketchbooks have their place in archaeology as in graphic art, but as well as this tool, the two subjects have more in common. While archaeologists are not the most frequent characters in comics, they do occasionally appear along with excavations and their spectacular discoveries, in imaginative illustrated stories that combine fact and fiction, mythical figures, places and objects.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 26 September 2018
to 1 July 2019.

NETHERLANDS
AMSTERDAM
Treasury! Masterpieces from the Hermitage

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the opening of the Hermitage Amsterdam, a wide array of fine objects and paintings from the State Hermitage in St Petersburg are being loaned for a special exhibition aptly named Treasury! Spanning 25,000 years of art history, it features more than 250 pieces, including prehistoric female figurines, well-preserved grave goods from ancient burials in Siberia, Ancient Egyptian statues, paintings by Leonardo, Rembrandt, Matisse and Velázquez, manuscripts and armour. Exhibits from different periods or cultures are deliberately paired to encourage visitors to focus on visual similarities or points of contrast between the two.
Hermitage Amsterdam
+31 020 530 87 58
(hermitage.nl)
Until 25 August 2019.


AMSTERDAM
All the Rembrandts of the Rijksmuseum

To commemorate the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt's death, the Rijksmuseum has declared that 2019 is the 'Year of Rembrandt'. The celebrations begin with an exhibition entitled All the Rembrandts of the Rijksmuseum which, as the title suggests, displays all 22 paintings, 60 drawings, and more than 300 prints by the artist from its permanent collections. With such a large assortment of works (it houses the largest collection of Rembrandt paintings in the world), the Rijksmuseum is able to offer a comprehensive tour through the artist's career. As well as fragile and rarely exhibited drawings, there are self-portraits, depictions of his wife Saskia, and of figures from society around him. His compositions based on episodes from the Old Testament show his great gift as a storyteller. Highlights of the show include his much-loved paintings, The Night Watch, 1642, (above), The Jewish Bride, 1667, and the exquisite pair of wedding portraits of husband and wife, Marten Soolmans and Oopjen Coppit, 1634.
Rijksmuseum
+31 20 674 7000
(www.rijksmuseum.nl)
From 15 February to
10 June 2019.

SPAIN


BILBAO
Architecture Effects

The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao is a classic example of how the power of architecture and art can transform a city, which makes it a fitting venue for this exhibition which explores architecture, art and storytelling in the 21st century. It asks 'What makes architecture more than just building?' and considers the use of digital technology in design and construction, with sculpture, prototypes and models, examples of artificial intelligence, archival material, videos and animation. A slide projection by Mikel Eskauriaza entitled Bilbao, circa 1997 (above) shows Frank Gehry's shining building emerging in this grey industrial port city.
Guggenheim Museum
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.eus)
Until 28 April 2019.

MADRID


Balthus

Known more simply as Balthus, the French artist Balthasar Klossowski de Rola (1908–2001) is one of the most unusual 20th-century painters. His works were influenced by a diverse range of artists, such as Piero della Francesca, Caravaggio, Poussin, Géricault and Courbet; illustrations from children's books, such as those by Sir John Tenniel in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and modern movements, like New Objectivity. Organised in conjunction with Fondation Beyeler in Riehen/Basel, where it was on show previously, and with support from the painter's family, this exhibition presents 46 of Balthus' works, mainly large format paintings that demonstrate his distinctive personal figurative style. Spanning his career from the 1920s onwards, the paintings include a typically quirky self-portrait entitled Balthus, The king of cats, 1935 (above).
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 26 May 2019.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
LONDON
Accordia Lectures

Moving bodies and making place: rethinking pilgrimage in early Roman Latium
Emma-Jayne Graham
12 March
Joint Lecture with the Institute of Classical Studies
Room 349, Senate House, Malet Street

New perspectives from old data: a century of archaeology and museum history of Villanovan Tarquinia
Judith Toms
7 May
Joint Lecture with the UCL Institute of Archaeology
Room 612, Gordon Square
The Accordia Research Institute's Italy Lectures are held on Tuesdays at 5.30pm.
www.ucl.ac.uk/accordia

Blowing up the Parthenon: Greek Antiquity as a Burden and as a Rival on the Modern Greek Stage
The inaugural Niki Marangou annual lecture will be delivered by Professor Vayos Liapis from the Open University of Cyprus. In it he will discuss recent iconoclastic productions of ancient Greek drama in Greece. Productions such as Matthias Langhoff's Bacchae, 1997, Anatoly Vassiliev's Medea, 2008 – both of which met with violent reactions from the Greek public – Rhesus, 2015, and Alcestis, 2017, by Katerina Evangelatos. All these show how drama challenges the culture of worship surrounding Classical antiquity.
23 May, 6.30pm
King's College London
www.kcl.ac.uk/events/event-story.aspx?id=1384d2b2-21fb-43b0-af0a-60a1f5a12dc5

Tudor Festival: Sir Thomas Gresham and His World
The founder of Gresham College, Sir Thomas Gresham was born 500 years ago. To celebrate this anniversary, a series of events that shed light on the Tudor merchant, financier and adventurer and the age in which he lived, include:

How Astronomy Changed our View of the Cosmos: from Gresham to the 21st Century
Joseph Silk
Wednesday 6 March, 1pm
Museum of London

Gresham's bequest to Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn
Margaret Willes
Monday 11 March, 1pm
Barnard's Inn Hall

The Natural Environment of Tudor London
Carolyn Roberts
Wednesday 10 April, 6pm
Museum of London

500 Years of Mathematics: Are We Living in a New Golden Age?

Chris Budd
Tuesday 30 April, 1pm
Museum of London

Gresham's Exchange
Stephen Alford
Wednesday 8 May, 6pm
Museum of London

Sir Thomas Gresham, 1519–2019
John Guy
Thursday 13 June, 6pm
Guildhall Old Library
www.gresham.ac.uk/series/gresham-500-celebrations/

OXFORD
The Global Connections of Gandharan Art
The 2019 instalment of the
Classical Art Research Centre's Gandhara Connections International Workshop will re-examine the connections between Gandharan (Greek influenced) art and other artistic traditions. Greece and Rome, China, the Iranian world, and the Indian subcontinent will all come under the microscope.

Admission is free but places should be pre-booked by contacting:
carc@classics.ox.ac.uk.
18–19 March
Ioannou Centre
www.carc.ox.ac.uk/GandharaConnections/events.htm

NETHERLANDS
MAASTRICHT: TEFAF Maastricht


Presenting 7000 years of art history, 276 dealers and experts in ancient art, design, paintings, works on paper, tribal art, fine jewellery and more will be exhibiting at this, the 32nd edition of TEFAF Maastricht. After a recent and extensive review of the fair's selection processes, 38 new exhibitors will be joining this event and, with the likes of Pace Gallery, Simon Lee Gallery and Galerie Gmurzynska now on board, strengthening its representation of modern art.


At the other end of the timeline the new exhibitors in the ancient art section are: Galerie Eberwein from France, specialists in Egyptian antiquities; Galerie David Ghezelbash also from France, specialists in Greek, Roman, Egyptian and Asian archaeological art from around the Mediterranean basin; and Kallos Gallery from the UK, specialists in Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Western Asiatic and European antiquities, who will exhibit a striking Attic black figure eye-cup, attributed to the Nikosthenic Workshop, circa 550–510 BC (above).
MECC 16–24 March
(www.tefaf.com)


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