Events


UNITED KINGDOM


BATH
The Triumph of Pan

In this year's National Gallery Masterpiece Tour Poussin's painting, The Triumph of Pan, 1636 (above) will travel around England. Its first destination is the Victoria Art Gallery in Bath, where it will join works from Bath & North East Somerset Council's collection for an exploration of the lasting impact of the Classical world on art and design and for a reflection on the rich Roman and Georgian heritage of the city of Bath. Also featured in the travelling exhibition is work by Thomas Malton, Jean Claude Nattes and Grayson Perry. Later this year Poussin's masterpiece will go on show at York Art Gallery and then at Auckland Castle in Co Durham.
Victoria Art Gallery
+44 (0)1225 477233
(victoriagal.org.uk)
From 11 April to 7 July 2019.

 



CAMBRIDGE

Making a Nation: Money, image and power in Tudor and Stuart England
While ruled by Tudor and Stuart monarchs, England went through many dramatic changes, not just in the ruling dynasties and in politics, but also in religion and culture. Coins and medals issued during these periods offer an insight into history, since they commemorate important events, provide official images of kings and queens – one gold sovereign (above) bears a striking image of Elizabeth I (1558–1603) – and also shed light on the art, trade and the economy during times of civil war, and the union of England and Scotland.
Fitzwilliam Museum
+44 (0)1223 332900
(www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk)
From 26 March to 30 June 2019.

CAMBRIDGE
Oscar Murillo
In
his first solo show at a UK public institution since 2013, the London-based Columbian artist Oscar Murillo (born 1986) is showcasing a new body of work encompassing painting, video, installation and live performance, and extending far beyond the limits of the gallery walls. The range of media and this multifaceted approach enhances the exhibition's sense of exploration of displacement and other topical themes such as the economic and human impact of globalisation.
Kettle's Yard
+44 (0)1223 748100
(kettlesyard.co.uk)
From 9 April to 23 June 2019.

CAMBRIDGE
Oscar Murillo

London-based artist Oscar Murillo (born 1986) is showcasing a new body of work including paintings, installation, live performance and video – extending beyond the limits of the gallery walls – for his first solo show at a UK public institution since 2013. The range of media and the artist's multifaceted approach enhances the exhibition's exploration of the experience of displacement and other topical themes, such as the economic and human impact of globalisation.
Kettle's Yard
+44 (0)1223 748100
(kettlesyard.co.uk)
Until 23 June 2019.

EDINBURGH
Ancient Egypt Rediscovered

After undergoing a major, 15-year-long transformation, the National Museum of Scotland has opened three new permanent galleries displaying more than 1500 objects, many on view for the first time. This coincides with the 200th anniversary of the first Ancient Egyptian artefacts entering the museum's collections. The Ancient Egypt Rediscovered gallery offers visitors the chance to delve into 3000 years of Ancient Egyptian history and also to learn about the work of Scottish archaeologists, such as Alexander Henry Rhind (1833–63). Highlights include: a well-preserved painted, sycamore-fig wood funerary canopy from circa 9 BC (above), which was excavated by Rhind; a gold ring bearing the name of Nefertiti, and the only double coffin found in Egypt. The second new gallery, Exploring East Asia, displays objects from the diverse cultures, traditions and histories of China, Japan and Korea. Among the varied exhibits are: Chinese oracle bones from 1200 BC; an 18th-century headdress made of kingfisher feathers; rare military outfits and Japanese woodblock prints. The third new gallery, Art of Ceramics, looks at Ancient Greek pottery, royal tableware and contemporary sculpture, as well as the use of ceramics beyond art, such as in 19th-century false teeth and, during the 20th century, heat-protective coatings for rockets.
National Museum of Scotland
+44 (0)300 123 6789
(nms.ac.uk)
Ongoing.

EDINBURGH
Andy Warhol and Eduardo Paolozzi: I want to be a machine

In a 1963 interview the Pop Artist Andy Warhol (1928–87) stated: 'I want to be a machine' signalling his interest in automation, mechanical processes, and machines, which was shared by his contemporary Eduardo Paolozzi (1924–2005) – as this exhibition shows. Working on either side of the Atlantic, both artists drew inspiration from the mass-produced images of popular and consumer culture, and both embraced the potential of screen-printing from photographs as a more mechanised means of producing works of art. Paolozzi's work reflects his fascination with the relationship between people and machines, and the beauty within machine forms.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
+44 (0)131 624 6200
(www.nationalgalleries.org)
Until 2 June 2019.


EDINBURGH
Charles II: Art & Power

With the Restoration in 1660 came a renewed interest in the arts in Britain after years of oppressive puritanical Cromwellian rule. Charles II and his court became great patrons of the arts, which not only helped to adorn the royal apartments, but also reinforced the king's position and glorified the monarchy. Portraits, including Peter Lely's Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland, circa 1665, depicted as Minerva (above), Old Master paintings, tapestries, furniture and other objects embellished in silver gilt, reveal how the arts helped to re-establish the Stuart monarchy.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.royalcollection.org.uk)
Until 2 June 2019.

HEREFORD
Creatures of the Mappa Mundi

Hereford Cathedral's Mappa Mundi, the largest surviving medieval world map, shows the world as it was known around 1300, with strange figures based on exaggerated, often fanciful, accounts from travellers, and myths about far-flung lands. Inspired by this, in a special textile commission, artist Yinka Shonibare has depicted creatures from the map – such as satyrs and giants – on a series of hangings that feature vibrant Dutch wax fabrics. The project addresses, in the words of the artist, 'two of the most pressing concerns of our time: environmental protection and immigration'. Different groups from across Herefordshire have made a vital contribution to the work by sewing Shonibare's designs while engaging in discussion on these key themes.
Hereford Cathedral
+44 (0)1432 374200
(herefordcathedral.org)
Until 1 June 2019.

HOUGHTON HALL
Henry Moore at Houghton Hall: Nature and Inspiration

Perhaps the most distinctive works of the celebrated 20th-century artist Henry Moore are his vast sculptural groups, often in bronze, that use figurative and abstract elements and are best seen with ample space in the great outdoors. The grounds of Houghton House offer a suitable setting for these monumental works, but this exhibition also brings Henry Moore inside with a selection of smaller sculptures, models and etchings that show
his important place in post-war Modernism. Outdoor highlights include the bronze Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae, 1968–69, the fibreglass Large Reclining Figure, 1984, and The Arch, 1963–69 (above).
Houghton Hall
+44 (0)1485 528569
(www.houghtonhall.com)
From 1 May to 29 September 2019.

LONDON
Young Wellington in India

The military exploits of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769–1852), against Napoleon secured him lasting fame, but details of the early career of the young Arthur Wellesley are less well-known. This exhibition looks at his time as a 27-year-old colonel in India, where his older brother Richard served as Governor-General. Portraits painted both before he set sail for India – such as one, circa 1804, made by John Hoppner (above) – and after he returned to England, are on show, alongside a selection of drawings of his military colleagues and friends, and some of the books Wellesley purchased to educate himself about India. On public view for the first time is the spectacular Deccan Dinner Service, which is formally laid out on a banqueting table in the Waterloo Gallery. Made in London, this silver gilt service was paid for with money raised by officers who fought with Wellesley in the Deccan region during the Second Anglo-Maratha Wars.
Apsley House
+44 (0)20 7499 5676
(www.wellingtoncollection.co.uk)
Until 3 November 2019.

LONDON
Manga

The Japanese narrative art form manga has its origins in the 19th century, when an assortment of drawings of various subjects, including people, animals and nature, by Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) were published as 'Hokusai Manga'. Today the global cultural phenomenon associated with manga encompasses graphic novels, animation, gaming and more. As well as tracing the roots of manga back to Hokusai and Kawanabe Kyōsai (1831–89), whose 17-metre-long Shintomiza Kabuki Theatre Curtain is travelling outside Japan for the last time, this show examines the work of more recent, internationally celebrated manga artists, such as Toriyama Akira (Dragon Ball), Tezuka Osamu (Astro Boy and Princess Knight), and Higashimura Akiko (Princess Jellyfish). The many different artists behind manga and the differing styles they used mean that there are a range of approaches to a wide variety of subjects. For example, the Princess Jellyfish series, intended primarily for women, explores issues of gender and identity in a fictional female-only Tokyo apartment block. Another work features the host venue, which appears in Professor Munakata's British Museum Adventure, 2011
by Hoshino Yukinobu (above).
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
From 23 May to 26 August 2019.

LONDON
Shift

For the third contemporary installation in SPACE, the gallery above Roman London's Mithraeum, the Berlin-based artist Claudia Wieser has assembled collaged wallpaper and sculptures that combine the ancient and modern. In Shift, material from fine art, architecture, design and film, are combined (above) to challenge viewers on the way they look at the present and the past. The composite wallpaper is made up of images of ancient statues, contemporary portraiture, and also stills from t he BBC television adaptation of I Claudius, while the sculptures make use of hand-painted tiles, mirrors and woodwork, as well as careful placement in relation to authentic Roman artefacts that are displayed at the Mithraeum.
London Mithraeum Bloomberg SPACE
+44 (0)20 7330 7500
(www.londonmithraeum.com/bloomberg-space)
Until 13 July 2019.


LONDON
Sea Star: Sean Scully at the National Gallery

The traditions of European art history have had a strong influence on contemporary artist Sean Scully and his abstract works. This is particularly true of JMW Turner's The Evening Star (circa 1830), which Scully has said is a source of inspiration for him. This painting will be displayed in an exhibition that unveils new works by Scully and celebrates the role of the National Gallery in continuing to inspire many leading artists. Recent monumental, multi-panel paintings and works on paper bear witness to Scully's bold approach, which, since 2016, has seen him painting on aluminium and copper, and to a profound love of colour and composition that he shares with Turner. Also like Turner, Scully is fascinated by the meeting-point of land, sea and sky, exemplified in his bold Landline paintings and which can be seen in his oil on aluminium work, Landline Star, 2017 (above).
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 11 August 2019.


LONDON
Mali Morris RA: On Paper 

Three different aspects of the career of Royal Academician Mali Morris are explored in this exhibition in the RA's Tennant Gallery. The show includes: 32 works on paper, selected by the artist herself, including plein air watercolours made in Cyprus and Canada in the 1980s, such as Lemba, 1989 (above); her 1990s series Edge of a Portrait, inspired by Italian Renaissance profile portraits; and her works in acrylic from 2000, showing her experimentation in different ways to structure colour and to explore light and space using colour.
Royal Academy
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 4 August 2019.

LONDON
Van Gogh and Britain
Van Gogh is most often associated with his native Netherlands, the artists' hub in Paris, and the picturesque landscapes in the South of France, but the artist also had an important relationship with British culture. As a young man he spent the period between 1873 and 1876 in London, where he saw works by the likes of John Constable and John Everett Millais. He wrote to his brother Theo that he loved the city, and he also developed a love of British writers, such as Shakespeare, Christina Rossetti and Charles Dickens, one of whose books is pictured in L'Arlésienne, 1890 (above), a portrait painted in the South of France near the end of the artist's life. Prints and engravings, particularly from popular magazines like the Illustrated London News, had a lasting impact on Van Gogh, although his only painting of London (Prisoners Exercising) is drawn from a print of Newgate Prison by Gustave Doré. Van Gogh made a powerful impression on British artists, too. The exhibition also explores his legacy through the eyes of Jacob Epstein, David Bomberg, Vanessa Bell, Francis Bacon and others.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 11 August 2019.


LONDON
Edvard Munch: love and angst

The work of the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) can be recognised by most – especially his iconic 1895 painting The Scream, which is even today referenced in the design of an emoji as a short-hand expression of fear. This expression can be seen elsewhere in the artist's work, including a rare black-and-white lithograph version (above). The large selection of prints charts his mastery of this artform and his acute rendering of a broad spectrum of feelings. Many of the works are on loan from Norway's Munch Museum, and – for the first time in the UK – Munch's original matrices used to transfer ink on to paper are on show. These are normally discarded, but Munch kept all of his: three are shown next to their corresponding prints. Among them is Head by Head, 1905, which reflects the complexity of human relationships.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
From 11 April until 21 July 2019.



LONDON

Reimagining Captain Cook: Pacific Perspectives
Contemporary art and historic artefacts have been brought together to re-examine Captain Cook's relationship with the people of the Pacific and the legacy of his voyages, some 250 years after he first set sail. The various ways
Cook is remembered in Australia, Aotearoa (New Zealand), New Caledonia, Hawaii, Vanuatu and Tahiti, as well as attitudes towards the explorer in Britain, are explored through a range of objects. From Hawaii, an 18th-century feathered cloak (above) is on display along with a colourful 1970s' shirt featuring images made by artists travelling with Cook. Acquired especially for this exhibition, it is the first Hawaiian shirt to enter the British Museum's collection. Other highlights include: contemporary works by Māori artists such as Lisa Reihana, whose Taking Possession, Lono, is inspired by 19th-century French wallpaper and reimagines early encounters between Pacific Islanders and Europeans.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
Until 4 August 2019.



LONDON

Harald Sohlberg: Painting Norway
To mark the 150th anniversary of his birth, Dulwich Picture Gallery is presenting the first exhibition devoted to landscape painter Harald Sohlberg (1869–1935) outside his native Norway. More than 90 works and archival material span the entirety of his career from his earliest output as a 20-year-old to the last year of his life, showing his enduring love of the Nordic landscape, particularly the Rondane mountains, the significance of colour and symbolism in his work, and other influences such as Norwegian Naturalism and Neo-Romanticism. Among the atmispheric works on show is Winter Night in the Mountains, 1914 (above), which took 14 years to complete.
Dulwich Picture Gallery
+44 (0)20 8693 5254
(www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk)
Until 2 June 2019.

LONDON
Sorolla: Spanish master of light
Portraits, landscapes, seascapes, garden views and other works by Spanish painter Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida (1863–1923) have been brought together for the most complete exhibition of his paintings outside Spain. As there are few works by Sorolla in UK public collections, this is a rare chance to see his evocative images of his native country. This is the first show in the UK dedicated to Valencia-born Sorolla since 1908, when he mounted his own show of work in London's Grafton Galleries. In the previous decade he had sent his vast canvases exploring social themes to major exhibitions around the world. They are now on show along with his sunny depictions of bathers and historic Spanish sites, such as Burgos cathedral under Snow, 1910 (above), and Monastery of San Juan de los Reyes. Both bear witness to his careful use of light.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 18 March to 7 July 2019.



LONDON

Only Human: Photographs by Martin Parr
Photographer Martin Parr is best known for his colourful images of the public that offer a snapshot of everyday life and leisure activities at home and abroad. This exhibition also addresses the complicated issue of national identity. Britishness, particularly in the time of Brexit, is examined through the images that show the British abroad, including soldiers in army camps. The rituals, ceremonies and traditions of the British establishment are recorded and famous figures, such as Tracey Emin, Vivienne Westwood, Pelé, and The Perry Family – Grayson, Philippa and daughter Florence, 2012 (above) are pictured. The exhibition also features intriguing self-portraits of Photo Escultura. Not seen in the UK before, this is a group of shrine-like carved photo-sculptures, based on Parr's likeness and commissioned from the last remaining traditional maker in Mexico City.
National Portrait Gallery
+44 (0)20 7306 0055
(www.npg.org.uk)
From 7 March to 27 May 2019.

LONDON
Anish Kapor
Pitzhanger Manor, the country home of the Regency architect and collector Sir John Soane, set in what was once rural Ealing, re-opens on 16 March after a three-year-long £12-million conservation and restoration project. The house has been returned to Soane's original design, with later architectural additions and extensions removed, and key structural and decorative elements reinstated. Built between 1800 and 1804, the manor has an adjoining gallery, added in the 1930s, which will now house a programme of exhibitions that showcase contemporary artists, architects and designers, and offer a fresh look at Soane's legacy. The inaugural exhibition presents the work of Anish Kapoor in a series of his sculptures that invite viewers to reconsider their perceptions of form and space, reflecting Soane's use of mirrors and light to manipulate space, which he did so successfully in his Lincoln's Inn home (now Sir John Soane's Museum).
Pitzhanger Manor
(0)20 8825 9808
(www.pitzhanger.org.uk)
From 16 March to
18 August 2019.

LONDON
The Renaissance Nude
Both live models and Classical sculpture were an important part of the training of the Renaissance artists and ultimately led to the prominence of the nude in the art of 15th- and 16th-century Europe, in both secular and sacred works. Organised by the Royal Academy and the J Paul Getty Museum, where it was first on show, this exhibition examines the status of the nude across a broad range of media, paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings and illuminated manuscripts, between 1400 and 1530. It looks at how the emergence of this pivotal and popular genre changed European art and how the nude in art was shaped by spiritual beliefs, humanist culture and new artistic attitudes. Highlights from Italy include Titian's Venus Rising from the Sea (Venus Anadyomene) circa 1520 (above) which is an example of how the nude was used in images inspired by Classical antiquity and mythology. Master works from northern European artists, such as Dürer, Cranach the Elder and Jan Gossaert, are also on view.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
From 3 March to 2 June 2019.

LONDON
Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams
The House of Dior has created magnificent gowns for members of the Royal Family and for celebrities since 1947. This exhibition looks at the work of French designer Christian Dior and the House's six subsequent artistic directors (Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons, and Maria Grazia Chiuri) through rare Haute Couture garments, photography, film and vintage perfume (including Miss Dior, launched in 1947 alongside the very first show). The exhibits reflect the importance of flowers in Dior's designs, as well as other sources of inspiration, including global travel and 18th-century decorative arts. Of particular interest is the section charting Dior's relationship with British manufacturers, such as Dents the glovemakers, established in 1777, and Lyle & Scott, the Scottish knitwear firm set up in 1874; and for notable clients, such as Nancy Mitford, Margot Fonteyn and Princess Margaret, who wore a dress designed by Dior for her official 21st birthday portrait (above) taken by Cecil Beaton (1904–80).
V&A
+44 (0)20 7942 2000
(www.vam.ac.uk)
From 2 February to 14 July 2019.

NORWICH
Viking: Rediscover the Legend

Weapons, hoarded coins and jewellery, looted silverware and a range of other artefacts, including some new discoveries, chart the relationship between the Vikings and the British Isles. This touring partnership exhibition, organised by the British Museum and Yorkshire Museum, has outstanding objects from both institutions, as well as local finds from Norwich Castle Museum. With Anglo-Saxon material also on display, stunning brooches and other objects provide evidence of how the Vikings shaped various aspects of life in Britain. (See In the News on page 5.)
Norwich Castle Museum
& Art Gallery
+44 (0)1603 493649
(www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk)
Until 8 September 2019.

OXFORD
Thinking 3D: From Leonardo to the Present

The challenge of capturing the three-dimensional on the two-dimensional surface of a page is one that has faced both artists and scientists. This is one of many shows that are being held to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, and it looks at how people have approached this challenge over the past five centuries. Drawings by Leonardo are on show, as well as the first printed illustration of a many-sided icosidodecahedron from the Divina Proportione, 1509, the only book that he illustrated. The exhibition charts how new technologies, such as the printing press, photography, stereoscopy and 3-D modelling, have helped develop ideas in anatomy, architecture, astronomy and geometry. Other highlights include anatomical books with flaps and pop-up elements, Galileo's illustrations on the moon based on his observations through a telescope in 1609, and the first geological map of Mars, made using data from NASA's 1971–72 Mariner 9 mission.
Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until February 2020.

WADDESDON
Brought to Life: Eliot Hodgkin Rediscovered

As well as an accomplished painter of still lifes and landscapes, Eliot Hodgkin (1905–87) was also a portraitist, an avid collector and a novelist. He worked mainly in oils and tempera, capturing such natural objects, such as radishes, feathers, dead leaves and lemons (One Lemon Quartered, 1972 is pictured above), and also London scenes, with remarkable precision. This major retrospective takes a closer look at Hodgkin through a selection of nearly 100 of his paintings and drawings, including a series of a dozen fruit and flower compositions, called The Months made in 1950–51. Many of these works come from private collections and have not been on public display before; some are still held by the families of their original owners. Among Hodgkin's admirers are Lord Rothschild and the late property developer and collector Harry Hyams, who acquired the artist's work for his Wiltshire home, Ramsbury Manor, which is reported to be in the process of becoming a national art gallery. Objects used by Hodgkin, including feathers, baskets, snail shells, seedcases, ceramics and an oil-can, are also on show alongside his apron, brushes, and a list of his tempera paintings and who had commissioned them, all giving an insight into his work.
Waddesdon Manor
+44 (0)1296 820414
(www.waddesdon.org.uk)
From 25 May to 20 October 2019.

WADDESDON
Madame de Pompadour in the Frame

Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild purchased François Boucher's 1756 portrait of Madame de Pompadour in 1887. Either before this, or very shortly afterwards, the portrait was reframed, with an 18th-century frame that had a later, 19th-century cartouche and decorative elements added to match the floral motifs on Madame de Pompadour's dress. When Baron Rothschild died in 1898, he left the portrait to his brother Nathaniel. The canvas then made its way to Germany, to the Alte Pinakothek in Munich, but the frame did not go with it, it remained at Waddesdon. Now, collaborating with Factum Foundation, 3-D digital reproduction technology and traditional restoration techniques have been used to present the famous portrait as Baron Ferdinand intended it to be seen. A facsimile of the portrait will be placed inside the newly conserved frame. Another work exploring the connection between the Madame de Pompadour portrait and the Rothschilds is Charles-Germain de Saint-Aubin, La verite Surmonte l'Autorité, 1757, a wicked caricature by Germain de Saint-Aubin that shows Boucher as the Devil painting his flattering portrait (above). This was also bought by Ferdinand de Rothschild as part of a collection of rare 18th-century French books.
Waddesdon Manor
+44 (0)1296 820414
(www.waddesdon.org.uk)
From 25 May to 27 October 2019.

WAKEFIELD
Yorkshire Sculpture International

Artists from around the world take part in the Hepworth Wakefield's exhibition as part of Yorkshire Sculpture International. New commissions will be on view, and diverse works by international sculptors presented in the UK for the first time. The overarching theme for the show is 'truth to materials', and it explores the ways in which the artists exhibited approach this idea and the relationship between the chosen material and sculptural form. Highlights include: Jimmie Durham's recent works in dialogue with early pieces by Barbara Hepworth, Henry Moore and Ronald Moody;
a new installation by Wolfgang Laib (above; he is installing Unlimited Ocean at School of the Art Institute of Chicago) who uses natural material such as rice and pollen; and a sculptural series
by Berlin-based Nairy Baghramian, which chimes with the architecture of the gallery.
The Hepworth Wakefield
+44 (0)1924 247360
(www.hepworthwakefield.org)
From 22 June to 29 September 2019.



WAKEFIELD
Magdalene Odundo: The Journey of Things

For her burnished ceramics, Magdalene Odundo has drawn inspiration from artistic traditions across the world, stretching back some 3000 years. In her quest to learn more about ceramic arts and crafts, she travelled widely, in Africa, in Kenya, Uganda and Nigeria, and in Asia, Central America and Europe. These journeys have made their mark on Odundo's own visual language. Her large, often asymmetrical, vessels, with striking silhouettes that evoke human forms, are often glazed in dense black – as in Untitled, 1989 (above) – and bright orange. Her distinctive pieces are on show alongside objects chosen by the artist for the role they played in inspiring her work. They include Ancient Egyptian and Greek pots, ritual sculpture from Africa, and British studio pottery by Lucy Rie. The show also explores the artist's interest in diasporic identity, the human body and the role of objects in intercultural relationships – all of which inform and influence her work.
The Hepworth Wakefield
+44 (0)1924 247360
(www.hepworthwakefield.org)
Until 2 June 2019.

WINCHESTER
Elizabeth Blackadder: From the Artist's Studio

As the first woman to be elected to both the Royal Scottish Academy and the Royal Academy of Arts, and holder of the title Her Majesty's Painter and Limner in Scotland, Dame Elizabeth Blackadder, who was born in Falkirk in 1931, has enjoyed a distinguished career. This exhibition, organised by Hampshire Cultural Trust, presents her varied works by covering the entirety of her career from its roots in the 1950s. Early drawings are on display along with more recent experiments in colour and space. Still lifes in oil, prints of cats, etchings – based on her travels in Italy and Japan – and botanical watercolours reflect the artist's interests over the decades. One of the highlights is a tapestry from the Fleming-Wyfold Art Foundation featuring Elizabeth Blackadder's beautiful irises (above) from 1987.
The Gallery, Winchester Discovery Centre, Winchester until 20 March.
The Willis Museum, Basingstoke from 29 March to 12 June 2019.
(www.hampshireculture.org.uk)

UNITED STATES


BOSTON, Massachusetts
Frida Kahlo and Arte Popular

Arte popular (traditional Mexican folk art) is an important mode of celebrating Mexican national culture, which took on particular political significance after the 1910–20 Mexican Revolution. Folk art was a source of inspiration for Frida Kahlo, who collected toys, decorated ceramics, devotional ex-voto paintings, and embroidered textiles. Their qualities influenced Kahlo's art and how she constructed her own self-image, by dressing in traditional Mexican garb. Eight of her paintings are shown alongside a broad range of examples of arte popular, which demonstrate how she engaged with colourful folk traditions. Among the highlights are Dos Mujeres (Salvadora y Herminia) 1928 – the first painting that Kahlo sold, in 1929; her Self-Portrait with Hummingbird and Thorn Necklace, 1940 (above), which shows the artist with dense foliage, real and imagined creatures, and her own pet monkey; and one of her small-scale still lifes (Still life with parrot and fruit, 1951), that teems with colour in a voluptuous jumble of shapes.Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
+1 617 267 9300
(www.mfa.org)
Until 16 June 2019.

LOS ANGELES, California
Oscar Rejlander: Artist Photographer

Known as the 'father of art photography', Oscar Rejlander was an innovative practitioner whose work and experiments with techniques in the early days of the new medium earned him the admiration of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, and the respect of his contemporary photographers Julia Margaret Cameron and Lewis Carroll. Born in Stockholm in 1813 and moving to England in his 30s, he worked as a painter before embarking on his prolific career. He secured a living through portrait photography, capturing images of the higher ranks of London society, but he was also interested in picturing the ordinary activities of the middle and lower classes, and he often staged in his studio familial scenes that he had seen out on the street. Combination printing – printing a single image from parts of multiple negatives that had been exposed separately – was one of the ways in which the photographer distinguished himself. It allowed him to create deeply dramatic compositions, such as Head of St John the Baptist in a Charger, circa 1860 (above) and other complex, allegorical works. Another of the remarkable Rejlander's innovations was his 'tunnel studio', which was built from iron, wood and glass. The sitter would look into the dark of the 'tunnel' from the light end, causing their pupils to expand and so enhance their expressive quality.
J Paul Getty Museum
+1 310 440 7300
(www.getty.edu/museum/)
Until 9 June 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated

The Tale of Genji is one of the most celebrated works of Japanese literature. Describing the lifestyles of courtiers, it was written by the noblewoman Murasaki Shikibu (circa 978–circa 1014). Although the original is lost, it has continued to influence Japanese art ever since. Looking at this remarkable 1000-year-long tradition, this exhibition brings together a wide range of art works (including important loans leaving Japan for the first time) that conjure up the world of the Heian (794–1185) imperial court, where the Tale of Genji was written, bearing witness to its powerful legacy. The Genji-related art includes: paintings, calligraphy, lacquerware, silk robes, ukiyo-e prints and even contemporary manga. Of particular interest is a 17th-century Edo scroll showing Murasaki Shikibu composing her classic literary work (above); the 12th-century Lotus Sutra with Each Character on a Lotus;
and a pair of Edo-period (1603–1868) screens by Tawaraya Sotatsu, that depict meetings between the prince Genji and a former lover. The Lotus Sutra with Each Character on a Lotus and Tawaraya Sotatsu's screens will be on view for only six weeks, rotating with other works.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 16 June 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
The World between Empires: Art and Identity in the Ancient Middle East
Important cities in the ancient Middle East were centres of commerce as well as of cultural and religious exchange. Distinctive and diverse cities like Petra, Baalbek, Palmyra and Hatra played host to such interactions between 100 BC and AD 250, as this exhibition investigates through stone and bronze sculpture, wall paintings, jewellery, and other artefacts. They reflect the diverse communities and contacts brought about by trade at the meeting point of the Parthian and Roman empires. In Baalbek, statuettes of deities demonstrate how Roman and Middle Eastern religious practices were intertwined, while artefacts from Judea at a time of struggle against Roman rule give a clear and powerful impression of Jewish identity. Among the spectacular objects on show is a bronze statuette of Jupiter Heliopolitanus (above ). (See pages 14–21 for an article by the exhibition's curators.)
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org) Until 23 June 2019.


NEW YORK, New York
I n Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met

Since the early days of the Met, Dutch Golden Age paintings have been an important feature of the museum's collection. Stunning 17th-century paintings by the likes of Rembrandt, Hals and Vermeer were part of the Met's founding purchase in 1871, and the museum has since acquired many more. Some 67 works from the permanent collections are on show, demonstrating both the refined skill of the Dutch artists and illustrating the key concerns of the day, such as religion. Landscapes, portraits, still lifes, and comic scenes all appear, as do paintings of women observed in everyday domestic settings, a major theme in 17th-century Dutch art best exemplified by Vermeer. Rembrandt is central to the exhibition, and his influence on his students, and other artists, is explored. Rembrandt's Portrait of Gerard de Lairesse, 1665–67, is juxtaposed alongside Lairesse's Apollo and Aurora, 1671 (above), which evoke some of the tensions between realism and idealism at the time.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 4 October 2020.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
Early Rubens

When he returned to Antwerp in 1608, after a period of study in Italy, Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640) established himself in his hometown by securing commissions for religious paintings for the city's churches, as well as for dramatic scenes based on Classical antiquity, such as The Dream of Silenus, 1610–12 (above) and the Bible, for private patrons. Organised by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Art Gallery of Ontario (where it will be on show 12 October 2019–5 January 2020), this exhibition brings together paintings and works on paper to chart the development of Rubens' career between 1609 and 1621. It explores how Antwerp, during its Golden Age, played its part as he cemented his position as one of the greats of Baroque art, and examines his bold handling of startling subjects.
Legion of Honor
+1 415 750 3600
(legionofhonor.famsf.org)
From 6 April 6 to 8 September 2019.

WASHINGTON DC
Empresses of China's Forbidden City, 1644–1912

The empresses of China's Qing dynasty (1644–1912) were influential and high-status figures with some impressive accomplishments, yet they are largely absent in Qing court history. The Qing dynasty was founded by Manchu
rulers from northeastern Asia, who selected the Forbidden City in Beijing as their main residence and seat of power. Manchu women had more rights than Han Chinese women and were encouraged to ride and hunt alongside men and empresses; one such was Empress Xiaozhuang (above). They were educated, appreciated art and played an important role in religion at the court, as the range of objects in this exhibition shows. Organised by the Smithsonian's Freer|Sackler, Beijing's Palace Museum, and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, the show brings together exquisite imperial portraits (many of which have never left the Palace Museum), rich robes and beautiful pieces of clothing, jewellery, and other exhibits that tell the story of five notable empresses. Empress Xiaozhuang (1613–88) helped to shape the religion of the dynasty by her promotion of Tibetan Buddhism, and Empress Dowager Cixi (1835–1908) ruled as co-regent and became China's most powerful empress.
Freer|Sackler, Smithsonian
+1 202 633 1000
(www.freersackler.si.edu)
Until 23 June 2019.

WASHINGTON DC
The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists
To mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of the influential Victorian critic and artist John Ruskin (1819–1900), National Gallery of Art in Washington is presenting an American perspective, through paintings, watercolours, drawings and photographs by artists in the USA. Though Ruskin never visited America, his publications made their mark there. The Association for the Advancement of Truth in Art was set up by a group of artists, scientists, critics and collectors in January 1863 to promote his ideas. Members of the Association strive for reform not only in art, but also in the spheres of social and political reform, particularly the abolition of slavery. The artists featured in this exhibition, such as Thomas Charles Farrer, a British expatriate who had actually studied art under Ruskin, were all influenced by the great Victorian critic, who championed 'truth to nature', and produced faithful representations of the natural world.
National Gallery of Art
+1 202 737 4215
(www.nga.gov)
Until 21 July 2019.

BELGIUM


BRUGES
Mummies in Bruges: Secrets of Ancient Egypt

In this exhibition, human and animal mummies (some of which have been scanned) from the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden's collection are on show alongside statues, stelae, burial gifts, papyri from the Book of the Dead, magical amulets, scarabs and compelling painted golden mummy masks (above), all of which shed light on Ancient Egyptian ways of life, their rituals, their burial customs, and their beliefs about the afterlife.
Oud Sint-Jan Exhibition Centre
+32 50 47 61 00
(www.xpo-center-bruges.be)
Until 1 September 2019.

CROATIA


ZAGREB
Ljerka Njerš

Formally trained as a ceramicist and painter, contemporary artist Ljerka Njerš works in a range of media. In this show she explores some of her favourite subjects – the female body, flowers and leaves, landscapes and birds. Njerš , who combines ancient methods with new techniques, is also a prolific printmaker. This exhibition is on show at Zadar's Museum of Ancient Glass until 2 May; it then moves to the Gliptoteka in Zagreb on 1 June.
In it is some of her latest work in a variety of media, including glass, of which a blue and yellow dish titled The Swan (above) is just one example.
Gliptoteka, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts
+385 01 468 6050
(gliptoteka.hazu.hr)
From 1 June to August 2019.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
Perfect Poses?

Carl Jacobsen (1842–1914), the founder of Copenhagen's Glyptotek, had a keen interest in 19th-century French sculpture, which was shared by Calouste Gulbenkian (1869–1955), founder of the eponymous museum in Lisbon, where this exhibition was on show until February. Drawing from both collections, Perfect Poses? presents an array of sculpture from the period between the French Revolution in 1789 and the start of the First World War in 1914, focusing, as the questioning title suggests, on the poses of the pieces. Sculptors Aristide Maillol, Auguste Rodin and Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux feature in this exploration of what body language can reveal about love, life and death.
NY Carlsberg Glyptotek
+45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
From 1 March to 16 July 2019.

FRANCE


LENS
Homer

Homer's huge impact on Western culture has not been confined to literature. It has also affected the visual arts. This show explores his legacy as the 'prince of poets', and responses to the Iliad and the Odyssey over the millennia. It examines the authorship of the two epics, looks at how interest in Homer motivated archaeological excavations, and introduces the beliefs that gave birth to these poems. It includes archaeological artefacts from Greece, such as the fine red figure plate showing Eos and Memnon, from 490–480 BC (above), tapestries and paintings by artists from Rubens, Watteau and Derain to Cy Twombly. (For more on Homer see pages 8–13).
Louvre Lens
+33 3 21 18 62 62
(www.louvrelens.fr)
Until 22 July 2019.

MOUGINS
Dufy Depicts the South

Originally from Le Havre
in Normandy and educated in Paris, artist Raoul Dufy (1877–1953) first went to the South of France in 1903, and returned again and again until the end of his life, drawn, like many other 20th-century artists, by the truly stunning light of the region, as well as the family connection through his wife Eugénie-Émilienne Brisson, who was from Nice. Dufy visited Martigues, Hyères, Vence, Marseille and other towns, portraying the landscape and coast and capturing the spirit of local fêtes and festivities, and everyday life in his evocative and joyful watercolours, paintings and drawings.
Musée d'Art Classique de Mougins
+33 4 93 75 18 22
(www.mouginsmusee.com)
Until 14 July 2019.

PARIS
Forgotten Kingdoms: From the Hittite Empire to the Arameans

Until circa 1200 BC, the Hittite Empire was a powerful force across the Levant, ruling over Anatolia and rivalling ancient Egypt. After its demise, Neo-Hittite and Aramean kingdoms arose in Turkey in Syria, carrying forward some of the political and cultural traditions of the fallen Hittite Empire. The stories of the Hittites, Neo-Hittites, and Arameans are explored in this exhibition through a wide range of archaeological evidence, including statuary and carved steles, such as the Hittite stele of a scribe called Tarhunpiyas (above). Major sites like Tell Halaf, near the Turkish border in Syria, are investigated closely. Tell Halaf was excavated by Max von Oppenheim in 1911–13, and large sculptures from the palace of the Aramean king Kapara were transported to Berlin where they went on display and where they suffered extensive damage during bombing in the Second World War. As well as shining a new light on forgotten kingdoms, the exhibition draws attention to the importance of conservation work, the risks that war poses to heritage sites, and the Louvre's work in protecting many endangered sites, including the museum's involvement in setting up the International Alliance for the Protection of Heritage in Conflict Areas, in 2017.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 2 May to 12 August 2019.

PARIS
Tutankhamun, Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh

The most spectacular archaeological discovery of the 20th century was undoubtedly that of Tutankhamun's tomb, which was full of 'wonderful things' in the words of Egyptologist Howard Carter who found it in 1922. Now, more than 150 of these truly 'wonderful things' are going on show in Paris, for an impressive display that not only highlights their exquisite beauty and craftsmanship, but also sets out to explain their ritual significance. Gold jewellery, sculpture and ceremonial artefacts help trace Tutankhamun's journey from death into everlasting life. More than 50 of the artefacts are on view for the first time outside Egypt.
Grande Halle de la Villette
+33 1 40 03 75 75
(expo-toutankhamon.fr)
From 23 March to 15 September 2019.

PARIS
Liturgical Textiles of the Byzantine Tradition from Romania
Part of the France-Romania Season 2019, this exhibition celebrates the exceptional Romanian collections
of Byzantine embroideries and highlights their importance in both Romanian and world heritage. The centrepiece is the battle flag of St George, offered to the Zograf Monastery on Mount Athos by Stephen the Great of Moldavia (1457–1504), which came into French possession, was presented to Romania in 1917, and is now back in Paris on loan. Some of the other extraordinary works from the mid-15th to the mid-17th centuries include the beautiful vestments of bishops, priests, and deacons, embroidered in the Byzantine tradition, and royal tomb covers that incorporate portraiture.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 17 April to 29 July 2019.

PARIS
Archaeology goes Graphic

The latest offering in the Petite Galerie, the Louvre's space devoted to art and cultural education for all, examines the relationship between archaeology and the art of the comic book, known in France as 'the 9th art'. With archaeological discoveries, such as a terracotta nude from 2340–1500 BC (above), and comics and drawings, visitors can learn about the work of the archaeologist from the 19th century onwards. Sketchbooks have their place in archaeology as in graphic art, but as well as this tool, the two subjects have more in common. While archaeologists are not the most frequent characters in comics, they do occasionally appear along with excavations and their spectacular discoveries, in imaginative illustrated stories that combine fact and fiction, mythical figures, places and objects.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 26 September 2018
to 1 July 2019.

ITALY


VENICE
Baselitz – Academy

For the first time in the history of the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice, a living artist is showing his work. It is the highly acclaimed German artist Georg Baselitz (b 1938) who will receive this honour, with a major retrospective timed to coincide with the Venice Biennale. Featuring his curious characteristic inverted paintings, such as Ankunft (Arrival), 2018 (below), drawings, prints and sculptures, this show explores Baselitz's 60-year career right up to his recent work. Some of his rarely exhibited works will also shed light on the artist's relationship with Italy and the Accademia.
Gallerie dell'Accademia
+39 041 5200345
(www.gallerieaccademia.it)
From 8 May to 8 September 2019.

NETHERLANDS
AMSTERDAM
Treasury! Masterpieces from the Hermitage

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the opening of the Hermitage Amsterdam, a wide array of fine objects and paintings from the State Hermitage in St Petersburg are being loaned for a special exhibition aptly named Treasury! Spanning 25,000 years of art history, it features more than 250 pieces, including prehistoric female figurines, well-preserved grave goods from ancient burials in Siberia, Ancient Egyptian statues, paintings by Leonardo, Rembrandt, Matisse and Velázquez, manuscripts and armour. Exhibits from different periods or cultures are deliberately paired to encourage visitors to focus on visual similarities or points of contrast between the two.
Hermitage Amsterdam
+31 020 530 87 58
(hermitage.nl)
Until 25 August 2019.


AMSTERDAM
All the Rembrandts of the Rijksmuseum

To commemorate the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt's death, the Rijksmuseum has declared that 2019 is the 'Year of Rembrandt'. The celebrations begin with an exhibition entitled All the Rembrandts of the Rijksmuseum which, as the title suggests, displays all 22 paintings, 60 drawings, and more than 300 prints by the artist from its permanent collections. With such a large assortment of works (it houses the largest collection of Rembrandt paintings in the world), the Rijksmuseum is able to offer a comprehensive tour through the artist's career. As well as fragile and rarely exhibited drawings, there are self-portraits, depictions of his wife Saskia, and of figures from society around him. His compositions based on episodes from the Old Testament show his great gift as a storyteller. Highlights of the show include his much-loved paintings, The Night Watch, 1642, (above), The Jewish Bride, 1667, and the exquisite pair of wedding portraits of husband and wife, Marten Soolmans and Oopjen Coppit, 1634.
Rijksmuseum
+31 20 674 7000
(www.rijksmuseum.nl)
From 15 February to
10 June 2019.

SPAIN


MADRID
Pioneers: Women artists of the Russian avant-garde

In Russia, the eventful years of the early 20th century coincided with an equally revolutionary artistic explosion; many exciting exhibitions were staged and radical manifestos released. Aspects of traditional Russian culture and art melded with influences from foreign avant-garde movements to form the Russian avant-garde, in which women significantly and very actively participated. This show looks at their work as pioneers in the creation and promotion of new artistic languages. Works by Natalia Goncharova, Liubov Popov, Sonia Delaunay and Alexandra Exter, including her Naturaleza muerta (Still Life), 1931 (above), are on show alongside photographs from the period.
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
+34 917 91 13 70
(www.museothyssen.org)
Until 16 June 2019.

SANTANDER
Calder Stories

American artist Alexander Calder (1898–1976) is best known for his mobiles (kinetic sculptures), many of which were monumental commissions for public spaces. But this exhibition, produced in collaboration with New York's Calder Foundation, takes a look at an intriguing but much less familiar aspect of his career: his unrealised projects. These include public commissions such as his Untitled 1938, a maquette for the 1939 New York World's Fair (above). Some of his schemes were left unrealised at various stages throughout his career and some were interrupted by his death in 1976. Drawings and models for these uncompleted projects give glimpses of Calder's creative process and also of his collaborations with architects Oscar Niemeyer, Paul Nelson, Wallace K Harrison, Percival Goodman and the composer Harrison Kerr.
Centro Botín
+34 942 047 147
(www.centrobotin.org)
From 29 June to 20 October 2019.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
LONDON
Accordia Lectures

New perspectives from old data: a century of archaeology and museum history of Villanovan Tarquinia
Judith Toms

7 May
Joint Lecture with the UCL Institute of Archaeology
Room 612, 31–34 Gordon Square
The Accordia Research Institute's Italy Lectures are held on Tuesdays at 5.30pm.
(www.ucl.ac.uk/accordia)

Blowing up the Parthenon: Greek Antiquity as a Burden and as a Rival on the Modern Greek Stage
The inaugural Niki Marangou annual lecture will be delivered by Professor Vayos Liapis from the Open University of Cyprus. In it, he will discuss some of the recent iconoclastic productions of ancient Greek drama that have been staged in Greece including: Matthias Langhoff's Bacchae, 1997, and Anatoly Vassiliev's Medea, 2008 – both of which provoked a violent reaction from the Greek public – and Katerina Evangelatos' Rhesus, 2015, and Alcestis, 2017. They all offer the opportunity to challenge the usual attitude of worship of Classical Antiquity.
23 May, 6.30pm
King's College London
(www.kcl.ac.uk/events/event-story.aspx?id=1384d2b2-21fb-43b0-af0a-60a1f5a12dc5)

Great Collectors: Taste, Passion and Patronage
The third instalment of the annual two-day Haughton International Seminar brings together 15 experts to discuss some of the world's great collectors through the centuries. The programme features: Lord Rothschild in conversation with Dame Rosalind Savill; Timothy Schroder on William Beckford; Dr Xavier Bray, Director of the Wallace Collection, on its founder Sir Richard Wallace; Caroline de Guitaut, Senior Curator of Decorative Art at Royal Collection Trust, on Fabergé, the Romanovs and the British Royal Collection; Paul Crane on Harry John Hyams' English and Continental porcelain collections; and Ian Wardropper on the fine art collection of Henry Clay Frick, one of whose acquisitions was Bellini's entrancing St Francis in the Desert, circa 1476–78 (above).
Advance booking is required.
26–27 June
British Academy
(www.haughton.com)

London Art Week
The biannual London Art Week returns to celebrate the city's place in the global art world this summer. Leading galleries, auction houses and dealers in and around Mayfair and St James's will host talks, exhibitions and events, and show antiquities, Old Master drawings, post-Impressionist paintings and much more.
28 June–5 July
Multiple venues
(www.londonartweek.co.uk)

Tudor Festival: Sir Thomas Gresham and His World
Celebrating the 500th anniversary
of the birth of Sir Thomas Gresham, the college he founded is presenting a series of special events that shed light on this accomplished Tudor merchant, financier and adventurer, and the age in which he lived:

Gresham's Exchange
Stephen Alford
Wednesday 8 May, 6pm
Museum of London

Sir Thomas Gresham, 1519–2019
John Guy
Thursday 13 June, 6pm
Guildhall Old Library
(www.gresham.ac.uk/series/gresham-500-celebrations/)









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