Events


UNITED KINGDOM



BIRMINGHAM
The Paper Museum: The Curious Eye of Cassiano dal Pozzo

In the 17th century, the Roman patron of the arts Cassiano dal Pozzo amassed a collection of more than 10,000 watercolours, drawings, and prints, known as Museo Cartaceo, or Paper Museum. Most of the works were acquired by George III for the Royal Collection in 1762. A collaboration between the Royal Collection Trust and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, this exhibition showcases works depicting a broad range of subjects and reflects Cassiano dal Pozzo's interest in the visual recording of human knowledge – including ancient art, such as a copy of the late Hellenistic Nile mosaic of Pallestrina (above), architecture, botany, zoology and military maps.
Barber Institute of Fine Arts
+44 (0)121 414 7333
(barber.org.uk)
Until 1 September 2019.



BIRMINGHAM

A Tale of Two Empires: Rome and Persia
Late Roman and Sasanian coins from the Barber's collection tell the story of the tumultuous relationship between the Roman and the Persian empires from the 3rd to the 7th centuries AD. Images on the coins and on seals on loan from the Fitzwilliam Museum bear portraits of kings and emperors – such as the silver antoninianus (above) of Valerian I (AD 253–260), – and also tell stories of bloody conflicts, political alliances, artistic exchanges, betrayals and revenge.
Barber Institute of Fine Arts
+44 (0)121 414 7333
(barber.org.uk)
Until 15 March 2020.

CAMBRIDGE
Artist Unknown: Art and Artefacts from the University of Cambridge Museums and Collections

Taking a look at an exceptionally diverse range of works from the collections of the University of Cambridge that have all been catalogued as 'artist unknown', this show invites the viewer to consider why we remember some creators and not others. With exhibits from around the world and spanning many centuries, it also shows how colonialism and exploration have shaped collections. Among them are a painted ancient Egyptian coffin fragment bearing the fingerprints of its maker, ornate bark cloth from the Pacific Islands, a whale's tooth engraved with the image of a ship, and some forged scientific instruments.
Kettle's Yard
+44 (0)1223 748100
(kettlesyard.co.uk)
From 9 July to 22 September 2019.

DITCHLING
Women's Work: Pioneering Women in Craft, 1918–1939

This show celebrates the work of a group of craftswomen active in Britain between the two World Wars, who are often overlooked in favour of their male counterparts. Textile artists, weavers, ceramicists and silversmiths, many of whom drew from their experiences of travelling in the First World War, looked to the past and pre-industrialised techniques to execute their lively designs. As a result, they played an important role in the development of the Arts and Crafts movement and influenced future generations of crafts people. Among the more than 100 works on show are textiles by Phyllis Barron and Dorothy Larcher, ceramics by Denise Wren, cutlery by Catherine 'Catsy' Cobb, and one of Elizabeth Peacock's vast banners for Dartington Hall.
Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft
+44 (0)1273 844744
(www.ditchlingmuseumartcraft.org.uk)
Until to 6 October 2019.



EDINBURGH
Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs

The royal families of Russia and Britain have been linked for many centuries. Now, a rich array of items from the Royal Collection explores the relationship between the two countries, from Peter the Great's visit to London in 1698 to the last emperor of Russia, Nicholas II – a cousin of George V, to whom he bore a close physical resemblance. This exhibition brings together diplomatic gifts and personal family mementoes, highlighting the close bond between the two dynasties. Treasures by Fabergé, photographs, archival documents, and portraits, such as Vigilius Eriksen's portrait of Catherine II, the Empress of Russia, circa 1765–9, (above) tell the story of historic international events and important family meetings.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7334
(www.rct.uk)
Until 3 November 2019.

HOUGHTON HALL
Henry Moore at Houghton Hall: Nature and Inspiration

Perhaps the most distinctive works of the celebrated 20th-century artist Henry Moore are his vast sculptural groups, often in bronze, that use figurative and abstract elements and are best seen with ample space in the great outdoors. The grounds of Houghton House offer a suitable setting for these monumental works, but this exhibition also brings Henry Moore inside with a selection of smaller sculptures, models and etchings that show his important place in post-war Modernism. Outdoor highlights include the bronze Three Piece Sculpture: Vertebrae, 1968–69, the fibreglass Large Reclining Figure, 1984, and The Arch, 1963–69 (above).
Houghton Hall
+44 (0)1485 528569
(www.houghtonhall.com)
From 1 May to 29 September 2019.




LIVERPOOL
Keith Haring

Easily recognisable by his energetic style and recurring motifs of flying saucers, barking dogs and crawling babies, the American artist Keith Haring (1958–90) was a leading figure of 1980s counterculture. His busy career was cut short when he died at the age of 31 owing to AIDS-related complications. Haring was dedicated to creating public art in New York, collaborating with other artists, such as Andy Warhol, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Tseng Kwong Chi and Grace Jones. He was openly gay and an AIDs activist, as can be seen in his work. He also designed anti-apartheid posters and the famous Crack is Wack mural in Harlem. For this, the first major UK exhibition of his work, large-scale drawings and paintings, archival documents, videos, photographs and wood-cuts, such as Untitled, 1983 (above ), are brought together, alongside an installation of fluorescent works from 1982 presented under UV light.
Tate Liverpool
+44 (0)15 1702 7400
(www.tate.org.uk/liverpool)
Until 10 November 2019.

LONDON
Playing with money: currency and games

Most families have played the boardgame Monopoly but it is only one of many 20th-century games that take money and the economy as their source material. This is shown in a new display at the British Museum. Among the historic games on show are Pit, which takes the stock exchange as its model, and Hunt the Coal Thief from wartime Germany, which tries to teach players about the impact of wasting resources.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
Until 29 September 2019.

LONDON
A Secret Beauty: The Spirit of Japanese Maki-e
For nearly 10,000 years, lacquer has been used in Japan to decorate and protect wooden, earthenware, bamboo and textile objects. This show explores the work of Koyanagi Tanekuni, who was born in Tokyo in 1944 and studied maki-e (lacquer sprinkled with gold or silver powder, an 8th-century technique), under three of Japan's 'Living National Treasures', a popular Japanese term for those individuals certified as 'Preservers of Important Intangible Cultural Properties'. Koyanagi has been instrumental in conservation in Japan, working on the Chuson-ji temple, and, for the past 50 years, creating exquisite traditional and contemporary lacquerwork.
Brunei Gallery, SOAS
+44 (0)20 7898 4915
(www.soas.ac.uk/gallery)
From 11 July to 21 September 2019.



LONDON

Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition
The story of the brilliant, meticulous American director Stanley Kubrick (1928–99) is told in this thrilling exhibition that explores his unique command of the creative design process of film-making, from storyteller to director to editor. Visitors can see, step-by-step, how Kubrick created genre-defining worlds in his ground-breaking films, and relive iconic scenes from 2001: A Space Odyssey (above), A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, Eyes Wide Shut. This show gives exclusive insight into Kubrick's mind through more than 700 rare objects, films, letters, interviews and photographs, that highlight his special relationship with England, particularly London, as his primary film location and a source of inspiration.
Design Museum
+44 (0)20 3862 5900
(designmuseum.org)
Until 15 September 2019.

LONDON
Michael Craig-Martin: Sculpture
Craig-Martin presents new works in this exhibition, which is also the first indoor display of his tall sculptures, sunk into the gallery's concrete floor. The 77-year-old artist's vibrantly coloured powder-coated steel forms resemble his line drawings and depict everyday objects, like a knife and fork, that somehow transcend time, or like a pair of headphones, tie the viewer to the contemporary.
Gagosian Britannia Street
+44 (0)20 7841 9960
(gagosian.com)
Until 3 August 2019.

LONDON
Royal Society of British Artists Annual Exhibition 2019
For this instalment of the Royal Society of British Artists' annual exhibition, a selection of member artists is exhibiting works that use a range of media and styles to capture landscapes in various stages of daylight from dawn to dusk. Work by last year's recipient of the society's Rome Scholarship is also on view, along with entries by the finalists for this year's scholarship.
Mall Galleries
+44 (0)20 7930 6844
(www.mallgalleries.org.uk)
From 4 to 14 July 2019.

LONDON
Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance

Known as El Bermejo (meaning 'reddish', probably referring to some aspect of his physical appearance), the 15th-century Spanish artist Bartolomé de Cárdenas created stunning works in oil paint, a technique probably learnt through studying Netherlandish paintings circulating in Spain at the time. This exhibition includes some of his exquisite religious compositions and puts forward the case for Bermejo's mastery of oils, surpassing his contemporaries in Spain. Highlights include the National Gallery's own Saint Michael Triumphant over the Devil with the Donor Antoni Joan, 1468 (above), on display again after a year of conservation, and the recently restored Desplà Pietà', 1490, which is on loan from Barcelona Cathedral and on show outside Spain for the first time.
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 29 September 2019.




LONDON

Félix Vallotton
With around 100 paintings by Félix Vallotton (1865–1925), including a 1905 portrait of his wife Gabrielle (above) this exhibition takes the viewer on a journey through every period of this often overlooked Swiss artist's career, starting with his arrival in Paris at the age of 16 and his early rejection of Impressionism and other contemporary movements in favour of the Northern and Dutch Transitions. Another important episode was Vallotton's marriage to Gabrielle Rodrigues-Henriques, a wealthy widow who gave him the financial security to focus on painting instead of print-making. Vallotton's depictions of the female nude, paintings and prints made during the First World War, and landscapes and still-lifes are on view, as are his bold and at times satirical woodcut prints, some of which featured in magazines, including the cultural periodical La Revue blanche, where he worked as principal illustrator.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 29 September 2019.



LONDON

Natalia Goncharova
In 1913, the avant-garde artist Natalia Goncharova (1881–1962)was the first Russian modernist to stage a monographic exhibition. Now, a century later, Tate Modern is staging the UK's first retrospective of the pioneering work of this leading artist. Goncharova drew inspiration from the traditions of her native Central Russia, but she also carried out ground-breaking experiments with Cubo-Futurism, Abstraction and Rayonism. A leading figure in Moscow, she also travelled to Paris where she collaborated with the Ballets Russes, in, for example, Peasant woman: Costume for Le Coq d'Or, 1937 (above). She also designed costumes and scenery for various productions in London, while her decorative pieces were commissioned for interiors from as far away as Chicago. A number of international loans includes works from Russia's State Tretyakov Gallery, which has the largest collection of her work. The exhibition explores her remarkable collaborations and experiments, her nudes and religious compositions, which led to a charge of blasphemy at the first exhibition of the avant-garde Donkey's Tail group in Moscow in 1912.
Tate Modern
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 8 September 2019.



LONDON

Queen Victoria's Palace
Marking the bicentenary of the birth of Queen Victoria, this year's exhibition at the summer opening of Buckingham Palace reveals how Victoria transformed the palace into what it is today. Only three weeks into her reign, in 1837 Victoria moved into the unfinished palace and she made it a family home and the headquarters of the monarchy. Buckingham Palace played host to grand balls and important events throughout her reign. Highlights include the queen's costume for the Stuart Ball in 1851, designed by the artist Eugène Lami, and The Ballroom, Buckingham Palace (above), a watercolour by Louis Haghe, which records a ball held to mark the end of the Crimean War shortly after the inauguration of the ballroom in 1856. This painting provides the only surviving depiction of the ballroom's original decorative scheme, influenced by the Italian Renaissance and designed by Ludwig Gruner (1801–82). 
State Rooms, Buckingham Palace
+44 (0)20 7766 7300
(www.rct.uk)
From 20 July to 29 September 2019.

LONDON
Young Wellington in India

The military exploits of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769–1852), against Napoleon secured him lasting fame, but details of the early career of the young Arthur Wellesley are less well-known. This exhibition looks at his time as a 27-year-old colonel in India, where his older brother Richard served as Governor-General. Portraits painted both before he set sail for India – such as one, circa 1804, made by John Hoppner (above) – and after he returned to England, are on show, alongside a selection of drawings of his military colleagues and friends, and some of the books Wellesley purchased to educate himself about India. On public view for the first time is the spectacular Deccan Dinner Service, which is formally laid out on a banqueting table in the Waterloo Gallery. Made in London, this silver gilt service was paid for with money raised by officers who fought with Wellesley in the Deccan region during the Second Anglo-Maratha Wars.
Apsley House
+44 (0)20 7499 5676
(www.wellingtoncollection.co.uk)
Until 3 November 2019.

LONDON
Manga

The Japanese narrative art form manga has its origins in the 19th century, when an assortment of drawings of various subjects, including people, animals and nature, by Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) were published as 'Hokusai Manga'. Today the global cultural phenomenon associated with manga encompasses graphic novels, animation, gaming and more. As well as tracing the roots of manga back to Hokusai and Kawanabe Kyōsai (1831–89), whose 17-metre-long Shintomiza Kabuki Theatre Curtain is travelling outside Japan for the last time, this show examines the work of more recent, internationally celebrated manga artists, such as Toriyama Akira (Dragon Ball), Tezuka Osamu (Astro Boy and Princess Knight), and Higashimura Akiko (Princess Jellyfish). The many different artists behind manga and the differing styles they used mean that there are a range of approaches to a wide variety of subjects. For example, the Princess Jellyfish series, intended primarily for women, explores issues of gender and identity in a fictional female-only Tokyo apartment block. Another work features the host venue, which appears in Professor Munakata's British Museum Adventure, 2011
by Hoshino Yukinobu (above).
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
From 23 May to 26 August 2019.


LONDON
Sea Star: Sean Scully at the National Gallery

The traditions of European art history have had a strong influence on contemporary artist Sean Scully and his abstract works. This is particularly true of JMW Turner's The Evening Star (circa 1830), which Scully has said is a source of inspiration for him. This painting will be displayed in an exhibition that unveils new works by Scully and celebrates the role of the National Gallery in continuing to inspire many leading artists. Recent monumental, multi-panel paintings and works on paper bear witness to Scully's bold approach, which, since 2016, has seen him painting on aluminium and copper, and to a profound love of colour and composition that he shares with Turner. Also like Turner, Scully is fascinated by the meeting-point of land, sea and sky, exemplified in his bold Landline paintings and which can be seen in his oil on aluminium work, Landline Star, 2017 (above).
National Gallery
+44 (0)20 7747 2885
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk)
Until 11 August 2019.


LONDON
Mali Morris RA: On Paper 

Three different aspects of the career of Royal Academician Mali Morris are explored in this exhibition in the RA's Tennant Gallery. The show includes: 32 works on paper, selected by the artist herself, including plein air watercolours made in Cyprus and Canada in the 1980s, such as Lemba, 1989 (above); her 1990s series Edge of a Portrait, inspired by Italian Renaissance profile portraits; and her works in acrylic from 2000, showing her experimentation in different ways to structure colour and to explore light and space using colour.
Royal Academy
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 4 August 2019.

LONDON
Van Gogh and Britain
Van Gogh is most often associated with his native Netherlands, the artists' hub in Paris, and the picturesque landscapes in the South of France, but the artist also had an important relationship with British culture. As a young man he spent the period between 1873 and 1876 in London, where he saw works by the likes of John Constable and John Everett Millais. He wrote to his brother Theo that he loved the city, and he also developed a love of British writers, such as Shakespeare, Christina Rossetti and Charles Dickens, one of whose books is pictured in L'Arlésienne, 1890 (above), a portrait painted in the South of France near the end of the artist's life. Prints and engravings, particularly from popular magazines like the Illustrated London News, had a lasting impact on Van Gogh, although his only painting of London (Prisoners Exercising) is drawn from a print of Newgate Prison by Gustave Doré. Van Gogh made a powerful impression on British artists, too. The exhibition also explores his legacy through the eyes of Jacob Epstein, David Bomberg, Vanessa Bell, Francis Bacon and others.
Tate Britain
+44 (0)20 7887 8888
(www.tate.org.uk)
Until 11 August 2019.


LONDON
Edvard Munch: love and angst

The work of the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) can be recognised by most – especially his iconic 1895 painting The Scream, which is even today referenced in the design of an emoji as a short-hand expression of fear. This expression can be seen elsewhere in the artist's work, including a rare black-and-white lithograph version (above). The large selection of prints charts his mastery of this artform and his acute rendering of a broad spectrum of feelings. Many of the works are on loan from Norway's Munch Museum, and – for the first time in the UK – Munch's original matrices used to transfer ink on to paper are on show. These are normally discarded, but Munch kept all of his: three are shown next to their corresponding prints. Among them is Head by Head, 1905, which reflects the complexity of human relationships.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
From 11 April until 21 July 2019.



LONDON

Reimagining Captain Cook: Pacific Perspectives
Contemporary art and historic artefacts have been brought together to re-examine Captain Cook's relationship with the people of the Pacific and the legacy of his voyages, some 250 years after he first set sail. The various ways
Cook is remembered in Australia, Aotearoa (New Zealand), New Caledonia, Hawaii, Vanuatu and Tahiti, as well as attitudes towards the explorer in Britain, are explored through a range of objects. From Hawaii, an 18th-century feathered cloak (above) is on display along with a colourful 1970s' shirt featuring images made by artists travelling with Cook. Acquired especially for this exhibition, it is the first Hawaiian shirt to enter the British Museum's collection. Other highlights include: contemporary works by Māori artists such as Lisa Reihana, whose Taking Possession, Lono, is inspired by 19th-century French wallpaper and reimagines early encounters between Pacific Islanders and Europeans.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
Until 4 August 2019.

LONDON
Anish Kapor
Pitzhanger Manor, the country home of the Regency architect and collector Sir John Soane, set in what was once rural Ealing, re-opens on 16 March after a three-year-long £12-million conservation and restoration project. The house has been returned to Soane's original design, with later architectural additions and extensions removed, and key structural and decorative elements reinstated. Built between 1800 and 1804, the manor has an adjoining gallery, added in the 1930s, which will now house a programme of exhibitions that showcase contemporary artists, architects and designers, and offer a fresh look at Soane's legacy. The inaugural exhibition presents the work of Anish Kapoor in a series of his sculptures that invite viewers to reconsider their perceptions of form and space, reflecting Soane's use of mirrors and light to manipulate space, which he did so successfully in his Lincoln's Inn home (now Sir John Soane's Museum).
Pitzhanger Manor
(0)20 8825 9808
(www.pitzhanger.org.uk)
From 16 March to
18 August 2019.



MILTON KEYNES
Paula Rego: Obedience and Defiance

Spanning the entire length of the London-based artist Paula Rego's career, from the 1960s onwards, this exhibition brings together more than 80 paintings, pastels, drawings, and prints that demonstrate her powerful responses to political and other injustices. With no definitive explanations, paintings such as Angel, 1998 (above) often hint at abuse and vengeance, and can be disturbing. Rego draws from memories of her childhood in Portugal and also engages with pressing social issues, addressing subjects such as the Iraq War, abortion, female genital mutilation and the 1932–1968 dictatorship of António de Oliveira Salazar. After its run at the recently reopened MK Gallery, the exhibition will travel to the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh (23 November 2019–26 April 2020), and then on to the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin
(25 May–1 November 2020).
MK Gallery
+44(0)1908 676900
www.mkgallery.org
Until 22 September 2019.


NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
Victoria & Albert: Our Lives in Watercolour

Another exhibition commemorating the 200th anniversary of the birth of both Queen Victoria and her consort, Prince Albert, this touring show of watercolours is from the Royal Collection commissioned, acquired, or even produced by the couple. The works from their personal albums include depictions of christenings and birthday parties, records of their homes, and views from their foreign travels. A few watercolours painted by Victoria herself are also on display, including one of her son Prince Arthur at the age of three at Osborne House in 1853 (above). The exhibition will also be on show at Poole Museum (26 October 2019–5 January 2020) and Wolverhampton Art Gallery
(7 March–31 May 2020).
Laing Art Gallery
+44 (0)191 278 1611
(laingartgallery.org.uk)
Until 15 September 2019.

NORWICH
Viking: Rediscover the Legend

Weapons, hoarded coins and jewellery, looted silverware and a range of other artefacts, including some new discoveries, chart the relationship between the Vikings and the British Isles. This touring partnership exhibition, organised by the British Museum and Yorkshire Museum, has outstanding objects from both institutions, as well as local finds from Norwich Castle Museum. With Anglo-Saxon material also on display, stunning brooches and other objects provide evidence of how the Vikings shaped various aspects of life in Britain.
Norwich Castle Museum
& Art Gallery
+44 (0)1603 493649
(www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk)
Until 8 September 2019.

OXFORD
Significant historical maps, maps of imaginary worlds, and maps by contemporary artists, Grayson Perry and Layla Curtis, have been brought together in a celebration of cartographic creation, which includes fine examples from the Bodleian's own outstanding collection of more than 1.5 million maps. This exhibition explores the ways that maps – made out of many different media including tapestry and sticks of wood – can be used, whether to administer cities, deceive attackers, draw national boundaries, or show the way to religious salvation. Highlights include: the late 14th-century Gough Map, the earliest surviving map of a recognisable Great Britain; a Tibetan Buddhist thangka (above) showing the Wheel of Life with the worlds of gods, demons and men, all held in the claws of all-devouring Time; and al-Idrīsī's beautiful world map, of 1154, which makes use of Islamic cosmology and geography.
Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until 8 March 2020.

OXFORD
Thinking 3D: From Leonardo to the Present

The challenge of capturing the three-dimensional on the two-dimensional surface of a page is one that has faced both artists and scientists. This is one of many shows that are being held to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, and it looks at how people have approached this challenge over the past five centuries. Drawings by Leonardo are on show, as well as the first printed illustration of a many-sided icosidodecahedron from the Divina Proportione, 1509, the only book that he illustrated. The exhibition charts how new technologies, such as the printing press, photography, stereoscopy and 3-D modelling, have helped develop ideas in anatomy, architecture, astronomy and geometry. Other highlights include anatomical books with flaps and pop-up elements, Galileo's illustrations on the moon based on his observations through a telescope in 1609, and the first geological map of Mars, made using data from NASA's 1971–72 Mariner 9 mission.
Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until February 2020.

WADDESDON
Brought to Life: Eliot Hodgkin Rediscovered

As well as an accomplished painter of still lifes and landscapes, Eliot Hodgkin (1905–87) was also a portraitist, an avid collector and a novelist. He worked mainly in oils and tempera, capturing such natural objects, such as radishes, feathers, dead leaves and lemons (One Lemon Quartered, 1972 is pictured above), and also London scenes, with remarkable precision. This major retrospective takes a closer look at Hodgkin through a selection of nearly 100 of his paintings and drawings, including a series of a dozen fruit and flower compositions, called The Months made in 1950–51. Many of these works come from private collections and have not been on public display before; some are still held by the families of their original owners. Among Hodgkin's admirers are Lord Rothschild and the late property developer and collector Harry Hyams, who acquired the artist's work for his Wiltshire home, Ramsbury Manor, which is reported to be in the process of becoming a national art gallery. Objects used by Hodgkin, including feathers, baskets, snail shells, seedcases, ceramics and an oil-can, are also on show alongside his apron, brushes, and a list of his tempera paintings and who had commissioned them, all giving an insight into his work.
Waddesdon Manor
+44 (0)1296 820414
(www.waddesdon.org.uk)
From 25 May to 20 October 2019.

WADDESDON
Madame de Pompadour in the Frame

Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild purchased François Boucher's 1756 portrait of Madame de Pompadour in 1887. Either before this, or very shortly afterwards, the portrait was reframed, with an 18th-century frame that had a later, 19th-century cartouche and decorative elements added to match the floral motifs on Madame de Pompadour's dress. When Baron Rothschild died in 1898, he left the portrait to his brother Nathaniel. The canvas then made its way to Germany, to the Alte Pinakothek in Munich, but the frame did not go with it, it remained at Waddesdon. Now, collaborating with Factum Foundation, 3-D digital reproduction technology and traditional restoration techniques have been used to present the famous portrait as Baron Ferdinand intended it to be seen. A facsimile of the portrait will be placed inside the newly conserved frame. Another work exploring the connection between the Madame de Pompadour portrait and the Rothschilds is Charles-Germain de Saint-Aubin, La verite Surmonte l'Autorité, 1757, a wicked caricature by Germain de Saint-Aubin that shows Boucher as the Devil painting his flattering portrait (above). This was also bought by Ferdinand de Rothschild as part of a collection of rare 18th-century French books.
Waddesdon Manor
+44 (0)1296 820414
(www.waddesdon.org.uk)
From 25 May to 27 October 2019.

WAKEFIELD
Yorkshire Sculpture International

Artists from around the world take part in the Hepworth Wakefield's exhibition as part of Yorkshire Sculpture International. New commissions will be on view, and diverse works by international sculptors presented in the UK for the first time. The overarching theme for the show is 'truth to materials', and it explores the ways in which the artists exhibited approach this idea and the relationship between the chosen material and sculptural form. Highlights include: Jimmie Durham's recent works in dialogue with early pieces by Barbara Hepworth, Henry Moore and Ronald Moody; a new installation by Wolfgang Laib (above; he is installing Unlimited Ocean at School of the Art Institute of Chicago) who uses natural material such as rice and pollen; and a sculptural series by Berlin-based Nairy Baghramian, which chimes with the architecture of the gallery.
The Hepworth Wakefield
+44 (0)1924 247360
(www.hepworthwakefield.org)
From 22 June to 29 September 2019.

UNITED STATES
NEW YORK, New York
Rembrandt to Picasso: Five Centuries of European Works on Paper

Brooklyn Museum has collected European works on paper for more than 100 years and ranging over five centuries of European art history. More than 120 works from the holdings – including complete compositions and preliminary sketches, portraits, landscapes and satirical scenes – are on display, many for the first time. Between Rembrandt and Picasso are a diverse range of artists, including William Blake, Albrecht Dürer, Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Francisco Goya, Vincent van Gogh, William Hogarth, Giovanni Battista Piranesi and Käthe Kollwitz.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718-638-5000
(brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 13 October 2019.


NEW YORK, New York
Apollo's Muse: The Moon in the Age of Photography 
Fifty years ago, millions of people around the world watched the first Moon Landing. Now, visitors to the Met can see exceptional images captured by Soviet and American lunar expeditions in an exhibition that explores our long enduring fascination with the moon. Images from the early days of photography include two newly discovered daguerreotypes from the 1840s, thought to be the earliest surviving photographs of the moon, and there are also images taken by pioneers of astronomical and night photography, such as John Adams Whipple (1822–1891). His picture of The Moon, 1857–60 (above) is a salted paper print from a glass negative. There are also artworks created after 1969 by artists such as Aleksandra Mir, Robert Rauschenberg, and Penelope Umbrico. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org) From 3 July to 22 September 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy
Discovered within the walls of a house in Colmar, northeastern France, in 1863, a small set of exquisite jewellery belonging to a single family tells the story of their changing fortunes in the tumultuous 14th century. The Colmar Treasure (on loan from Musée de Cluny in Paris) consists of more than 300 coins, gilded buttons, brooches, an enamelled belt, fine rings with sapphire, ruby, garnet, turquoise and onyx, and a Jewish ceremonial wedding ring (above). As the richness of these items attest, Colmar's Jewish community once thrived but, when the plague devastated the area in 1348-49, it was scapegoated and they were put to death. Related works from other collections look at the role of Jewish communities
in medieval Europe.
The Met Cloisters
+1 212 923 3700
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 22 July 2019 to 12 January 2020.


NEW YORK, New York
I n Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met

Since the early days of the Met, Dutch Golden Age paintings have been an important feature of the museum's collection. Stunning 17th-century paintings by the likes of Rembrandt, Hals and Vermeer were part of the Met's founding purchase in 1871, and the museum has since acquired many more. Some 67 works from the permanent collections are on show, demonstrating both the refined skill of the Dutch artists and illustrating the key concerns of the day, such as religion. Landscapes, portraits, still lifes, and comic scenes all appear, as do paintings of women observed in everyday domestic settings, a major theme in 17th-century Dutch art best exemplified by Vermeer. Rembrandt is central to the exhibition, and his influence on his students, and other artists, is explored. Rembrandt's Portrait of Gerard de Lairesse, 1665–67, is juxtaposed alongside Lairesse's Apollo and Aurora, 1671 (above), which evoke some of the tensions between realism and idealism at the time.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212 535 7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 4 October 2020.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
Lisa Reihana: in Pursuit of Venus [infected]

New Zealand artist Lisa Reihana's extraordinary, nearly 25m-long panoramic video work in Pursuit of Venus [infected], 2015–17 (detail, above) has just been acquired as part of the de Young museum's contemporary art programme. Reihana's digital scroll challenges the romanticised view of European explorations in Polynesia as presented in Joseph Dufour's early 19th-century French scenic wallpaper Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique (Native Peoples of the South Pacific). Instead, she offers a more complex approach to cultural identity and colonialism. For this, the first display of the work in the continental United States, Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique wallpaper and an 18th-century folio with scenes of Captain Cook's exploits in the Pacific Ocean will also be on view.
de Young museum
+1 415-750-3600
(deyoungmuseum.org)
From 10 August 2019 to 5 January 2020.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
Early Rubens

When he returned to Antwerp in 1608, after a period of study in Italy, Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640) established himself in his hometown by securing commissions for religious paintings for the city's churches, as well as for dramatic scenes based on Classical antiquity, such as The Dream of Silenus, 1610–12 (above) and the Bible, for private patrons. Organised by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Art Gallery of Ontario (where it will be on show 12 October 2019–5 January 2020), this exhibition brings together paintings and works on paper to chart the development of Rubens' career between 1609 and 1621. It explores how Antwerp, during its Golden Age, played its part as he cemented his position as one of the greats of Baroque art, and examines his bold handling of startling subjects.
Legion of Honor
+1 415 750 3600
(legionofhonor.famsf.org)
From 6 April 6 to 8 September 2019.

WASHINGTON DC
Whistler in Watercolor

James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834–1903) created many small marketable works in watercolour over a period of about 15 years from 1881. Charles Lang Freer, the founder of the Freer Gallery, collected many, establishing the world's largest collection of his fellow American's watercolours. These fragile works are rarely displayed. They include seascapes, nocturnes, street scenes, and images of the home and studio, some of which have recently been studied by the museum's researchers, adding new information about Whistler's materials and methods. Many of his watercolours, such as Southend Pier 1882-4 (above), show daily life. To coincide with this exhibition, blue-and-white Chinese porcelain has been placed on the shelves of the Freer's Peacock Room. This was originally the dining-room of shipping magnate Frederick Leyland's London townhouse. When Whistler painted the panels of the Kensington room in blue and gold, it held fine Kangxi period porcelain, and so reinstating similar pieces of Kangxi ware (and introducing related contemporary porcelains) for the ongoing display The Peacock Room, in Blue and White helps conjure up the artist's own vision for the ornate interior.
Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian
+1 202 633 1000
(www.freersackler.si.edu)
Until 6 October 2019.

WASHINGTON DC
The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists
To mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of the influential Victorian critic and artist John Ruskin (1819–1900), National Gallery of Art in Washington is presenting an American perspective, through paintings, watercolours, drawings and photographs by artists in the USA. Though Ruskin never visited America, his publications made their mark there. The Association for the Advancement of Truth in Art was set up by a group of artists, scientists, critics and collectors in January 1863 to promote his ideas. Members of the Association strive for reform not only in art, but also in the spheres of social and political reform, particularly the abolition of slavery. The artists featured in this exhibition, such as Thomas Charles Farrer, a British expatriate who had actually studied art under Ruskin, were all influenced by the great Victorian critic, who championed 'truth to nature', and produced faithful representations of the natural world.
National Gallery of Art
+1 202 737 4215
(www.nga.gov)
Until 21 July 2019.


BELGIUM


BRUGES
Mummies in Bruges: Secrets of Ancient Egypt

In this exhibition, human and animal mummies (some of which have been scanned) from the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden's collection are on show alongside statues, stelae, burial gifts, papyri from the Book of the Dead, magical amulets, scarabs and compelling painted golden mummy masks (above), all of which shed light on Ancient Egyptian ways of life, their rituals, their burial customs, and their beliefs about the afterlife.
Oud Sint-Jan Exhibition Centre
+32 50 47 61 00
(www.xpo-center-bruges.be)
Until 1 September 2019.

CROATIA


ZAGREB
Ljerka Njerš

Formally trained as a ceramicist and painter, contemporary artist Ljerka Njerš works in a range of media. In this show she explores some of her favourite subjects – the female body, flowers and leaves, landscapes and birds. Njerš , who combines ancient methods with new techniques, is also a prolific printmaker. This exhibition is on show at Zadar's Museum of Ancient Glass until 2 May; it then moves to the Gliptoteka in Zagreb on 1 June. In it is some of her latest work in a variety of media, including glass, of which a blue and yellow dish titled The Swan (above) is just one example.
Gliptoteka, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts
+385 01 468 6050
(gliptoteka.hazu.hr)
From 1 June to August 2019.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory

Working in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, French painter Pierre Bonnard (1867–1947) often created his colourful compositions from memory, detaching himself temporally from his subjects. Organised in close collaboration with Tate Modern where it was on view earlier this year, this show explores his compositions and use of perspective, which can be as striking as his dynamic use of colour. With intimate domestic scenes, such as Nude in the Interior, 1935 (above ), unconventional landscapes and other works (some accompanied by a soundscape), the exhibition considers Bonnard's place in the history of modern art, a place that has been hotly debated.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek
+ 45 33 41 81 41
(www.glyptoteket.com)
Until 22 September 2019.

FRANCE
PARIS
Trees

As a vital part of the world's ecosystem, trees influence the climate, have sensory perception and communication skills, and can live for thousands of years. This exhibition, one of several on this subject in recent years, examines our relationship with nature, takes a closer look at these wonderful plants, their beauty and their incredible biology. Scientific imagery, films, photographs, sound installations, and works by contemporary artists such as the Brazilian Luiz Zerbini, offer insights on trees as they become increasingly vital to our planet's threatened survival. Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain
+33 1 42 18 56 50
(www.fondationcartier.com)
From 11 July to 10 November 2019.

PARIS
Forgotten Kingdoms: From the Hittite Empire to the Arameans

Until circa 1200 BC, the Hittite Empire was a powerful force across the Levant, ruling over Anatolia and rivalling ancient Egypt. After its demise, Neo-Hittite and Aramean kingdoms arose in Turkey in Syria, carrying forward some of the political and cultural traditions of the fallen Hittite Empire. The stories of the Hittites, Neo-Hittites, and Arameans are explored in this exhibition through a wide range of archaeological evidence, including statuary and carved steles, such as the Hittite stele of a scribe called Tarhunpiyas (above). Major sites like Tell Halaf, near the Turkish border in Syria, are investigated closely. Tell Halaf was excavated by Max von Oppenheim in 1911–13, and large sculptures from the palace of the Aramean king Kapara were transported to Berlin where they went on display and where they suffered extensive damage during bombing in the Second World War. As well as shining a new light on forgotten kingdoms, the exhibition draws attention to the importance of conservation work, the risks that war poses to heritage sites, and the Louvre's work in protecting many endangered sites, including the museum's involvement in setting up the International Alliance for the Protection of Heritage in Conflict Areas, in 2017.
Louvre
+33 1 40 20 50 50
(www.louvre.fr)
From 2 May to 12 August 2019.

PARIS
Tutankhamun, Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh

The most spectacular archaeological discovery of the 20th century was undoubtedly that of Tutankhamun's tomb, which was full of 'wonderful things' in the words of Egyptologist Howard Carter who found it in 1922. Now, more than 150 of these truly 'wonderful things' are going on show in Paris, for an impressive display that not only highlights their exquisite beauty and craftsmanship, but also sets out to explain their ritual significance. Gold jewellery, sculpture and ceremonial artefacts help trace Tutankhamun's journey from death into everlasting life. More than 50 of the artefacts are on view for the first time outside Egypt.
Grande Halle de la Villette
+33 1 40 03 75 75
(expo-toutankhamon.fr)
From 23 March to 15 September 2019.

GERMANY


BERLIN
Strong Figures: Greek Portraits from Antiquity

Greek portraits of specific, real individuals have had a profound impact on Western art history, influencing traditions of portraiture today. These ancient portraits did not have to be true to life, and they often carried inscriptions identifying their subjects, who appear according to cultural types, with their age, status and affiliation. Marble portrait busts of poets, philosophers, kings and queens, such as Portrait of Queen Berenice II of Egypt who reigned in 246-221 BC (above), and figures of state are on view with reliefs, vases paintings (including a unique Attic painting of the poet Sappho), and other artefacts, which cast light on the tension between socials ideals and the portrayal of real figures.
Altes Museum
+49 30 266424242
(www.smb.museum)
Until 2 February 2020.


BONN
Goethe: Transformation of the World

Works of theatre, film, paintings, sculpture, music and photography reveal the remarkable and diverse legacy of writer Johann Wolfgang Goethe (1749–1832). They help chart the events of his life: his upbringing in Germany and his travels to Italy, as seen in Johann Heinrich Schilbach's View Across the Forum Romanum to the Capitol, 1825 (above), his significant body of travel writing, novels (including his 1774 cult hero in The Sorrows of Young Werther), poetry and art treatises, that helped shape the view of the world that coloured the 18th and 19th centuries.
Bundeskunsthalle
+49 228 91710
(www.bundeskunsthalle.de)
Until 15 September 2019.


WEIMAR
The Bauhaus comes from Weimar

As the art world celebrates 100 years of the Bauhaus, a new museum devoted to Walter Gropius' influential art and design school opens its doors in its home-town of Weimar. This permanent exhibition draws on a collection of Bauhaus works begun by Gropius in the 1920s with pieces selected from 13,000 objects that trace the development of the school and invite the visitor to consider the question Gropius put: 'How do we want to live together?' Works include a slatted chair by Marcel Breuer, furniture by Mies van der Rohe, and Dragonjar (above) by the ceramicist Wilhelm Löber's (1903–81)).
Bauhaus Museum Weimar
+49 3643 545400
(www.klassik-stiftung.de/bauhaus-museum-weimar/)
Ongoing.

ITALY


VENICE
Baselitz – Academy

For the first time in the history of the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice, a living artist is showing his work. It is the highly acclaimed German artist Georg Baselitz (b 1938) who will receive this honour, with a major retrospective timed to coincide with the Venice Biennale. Featuring his curious characteristic inverted paintings, such as Ankunft (Arrival), 2018 (below), drawings, prints and sculptures, this show explores Baselitz's 60-year career right up to his recent work. Some of his rarely exhibited works will also shed light on the artist's relationship with Italy and the Accademia.
Gallerie dell'Accademia
+39 041 5200345
(www.gallerieaccademia.it)
From 8 May to 8 September 2019.

NETHERLANDS
LEIDEN
Medieval gardens: Earthly paradises in East and West

Between AD 1200 and 1600 gardens were important and desirable features in both Christian Europe and the Islamic Middle East. Vegetable gardens, ornamental gardens, and the concepts of the garden as evocations of love and paradise permeated medieval art. Unearthed tools and other items, including falcon hoods, medicine pots, and chess pieces, from medieval gardens are on show along with illuminated manuscripts, herbaria with dried plants, tiles with floral motifs. These as well as paintings, explore the many aspects of the medieval garden which was an ideal setting for recreation, hunting, and courtly love, and also had a central role in religious thought, revealing striking similarities between gardens in Western and Eastern culture.
Rijksmuseum van Oudheden
+31 071 5163 163
Until 1 September 2019.
(www.rmo.nl)

AMSTERDAM
Treasury! Masterpieces from the Hermitage

To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the opening of the Hermitage Amsterdam, a wide array of fine objects and paintings from the State Hermitage in St Petersburg are being loaned for a special exhibition aptly named Treasury! Spanning 25,000 years of art history, it features more than 250 pieces, including prehistoric female figurines, well-preserved grave goods from ancient burials in Siberia, Ancient Egyptian statues, paintings by Leonardo, Rembrandt, Matisse and Velázquez, manuscripts and armour. Exhibits from different periods or cultures are deliberately paired to encourage visitors to focus on visual similarities or points of contrast between the two.
Hermitage Amsterdam
+31 020 530 87 58
(hermitage.nl)
Until 25 August 2019.

SPAIN
BILBAO
A Backward Glance: Giorgio Morandi and the Old Masters

Italian painter Giorgio Morandi (1890–1964) is best known for his delicate still lifes featuring everyday objects with a focus on form; such Still Life (Natura morta) 1955 (above). Aspects of these seemingly simple works draw inspiration from details of Old Masters, some of which are displayed here. El Greco's flowers, Zurbarán's light, and the geometry of Chardin's houses of cards – all inspired Morandi.
Guggenheim Museum Bilbao
+34 944 35 90 80
(www.guggenheim-bilbao.es)
Until 6 October 2019.

SANTANDER
Calder Stories

American artist Alexander Calder (1898–1976) is best known for his mobiles (kinetic sculptures), many of which were monumental commissions for public spaces. But this exhibition, produced in collaboration with New York's Calder Foundation, takes a look at an intriguing but much less familiar aspect of his career: his unrealised projects. These include public commissions such as his Untitled 1938, a maquette for the 1939 New York World's Fair (above). Some of his schemes were left unrealised at various stages throughout his career and some were interrupted by his death in 1976. Drawings and models for these uncompleted projects give glimpses of Calder's creative process and also of his collaborations with architects Oscar Niemeyer, Paul Nelson, Wallace K Harrison, Percival Goodman and the composer Harrison Kerr.
Centro Botín
+34 942 047 147
(www.centrobotin.org)
From 29 June to 20 October 2019.

EVENTS
UNITED KINGDOM
London Art Week
The summer edition of the twice annual extravaganza London Art Week returns once more, as the city celebrates its place in the art world. Leading galleries, dealers and auction houses in and around Mayfair and St James's are hosting talks, exhibitions and events, that showcase ancient art, Old Master drawings, post-Impressionist paintings, and more.
28 June–5 July
Multiple venues
(www.londonartweek.co.uk)

Salamanca Weekend
On 22 July 1812, Wellington led his troops to secure an Anglo-Portuguese victory over Franco-Spanish troops at Salamanca, thus maintaining Portuguese independence and demonstrating that Napoleon could be beaten. To mark the anniversary of the Battle of Salamanca, Apsley House will play host to the 68th Light Infantry Re-enactment Society, who will recreate a Napoleonic War camp, and the Arbeau Dancers, who will demonstrate their Regency dances. There will also be a range of talks by leading experts.
22-23 July
Apsley House
(www.wellingtoncollection.co.uk)



Specialist art courses at SOAS

The Arts of Christianity: From East Africa to East Asia This four-day art course, with talks by leading experts and curators, and visits to museums and galleries, will explore the diversity of Christian art and architecture beyond the Mediterranean and Europe, suhas the iconography in Central Asia's deserts, Jesuits in China, icons in Edo-period Japan and rock-cut churches and 14th–15th-century illuminated Gospels from Ethiopia, such as The Transfiguration (above).
8-11 July

A Secret Beauty: Study Day on Japanese Lacquer
Coinciding with the exhibition A Secret Beauty: The Spirit of Japanese Maki-e on show at the Brunei Gallery (see earlier entry), this study-day examines the sap of the tree Toxicodendron vernicifluum, native to East Asia, and its use in art. It offers the chance to find out more about the lacquer and the maki-e technique, contemporary lacquerwork, and the care and conservation of the medium and a gallery talk given by the lacquer artist Koyanagi Tanekuni.
For details of both courses contact: Denise Acford on 020 7898 4451
or visit asianart@soas.ac.uk.
13 July 2019
SOAS
(soas.ac.uk/art-short-course)

Summer School in Homer
Find out more about the Homeric world on a 5-day intensive course. The summer school's language and literature classes – divided into groups of 15 to 20 participants according to level of experience – cover commentary, translation, grammar, and reading texts.
The closing date for bookings is Monday 15 July
For application forms or further enquiries, contact:
Dr Antony Makrinos at homersummerschool@ucl.ac.uk
22-26 July
UCL
(www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/outreach/summer-schools/summer-school-homer-2019)

VARIOUS LOCATIONS



Mythos: A Trilogy. Gods. Heroes. Men.
The multi-talented Stephen Fry (above) stars in three full-length shows he has written, offering a comedic and personal take on tales of love, war, and more from the ancient Greek world. Gods, explores Chaos and the Greek pantheon; Heroes, features Perseus, Heracles and Theseus; Men, recounts the events of the Trojan War followed by Odysseus' long voyage home. After a stint at Edinburghl, Mythos (also the title of Stephen Fry's recent book) will go on a nationwide tour:

Edinburgh International Festival,
19-25 August

The Lowry, Salford,
30-31 August

Liverpool Philharmonic Hall,
5-6 September

Birmingham Symphony Hall,
9-12 September

London Palladium,
13-14 September

New Theatre, Oxford,
19-21 September

Sage Gateshead,
22-23 September
(www.stephenfrymythoslive.com)

FRANCE
PARIS
La Biennale Paris 2019

For its 31st edition, the annual (as of 2017) French art fair La Biennale Paris returns to the Grand Palais, with leading exhibitors from around France and beyond, bringing with them works of art that span more than six millennia of history. The Kingdom of Bahrain who is this year's guest of honour is hosting a pavilion which is dedicated mainly to contemporary art but also to the heritage of this Gulf country. Bahraini artefacts, collectables and arts and crafts will all be on show.
13-17 September
Grand Palais
(www.labiennaleparis.com/en/)







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