Events


UNITED KINGDOM


BATH
Henri Matisse: Master of Line

Henri Matisse (1869–1954) is best known for his intensely coloured paintings and collages, but this exhibition, marking the 150th anniversary of the artist's birth, puts the spotlight on his etchings and his considerable skills as a draughtsman. With around 20 works, the show presents some of Matisse's first etchings made between 1914–19, including Figure Endormie sur Fond Moucharabieh, 1919 (above). Matisse's prints from the late 1920s, when he was deeply involved in printmaking, also feature prominently, depicting themes and subjects seen elsewhere in the artist's output at this time, such as female nudes in ornate interiors.
Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388569
(www.holburne.org)
From 18 September
to 5 January 2020.


BATH
Rembrandt in Print

Another exhibition devoted to prints at the Holburne Museum (organised by the Ashmolean Museum) marks the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt's death in 1669. Some 50 prints from the Ashmolean's collection are on view as part of a national tour. The works show Rembrandt's technical accomplishments, his varied, expressive techniques, and his powerful manner of telling a story. As well as landscapes, religious subjects and self-portraits (including an etching called Self-portrait open-mouthed, as if shouting, 1630, above), the prints include everyday scenes, such as family studies and streestcapes.
Holburne Museum
+44 (0)1225 388569
(www.holburne.org)
From 4 October to
5 January 2020.

BIRMINGHAM
Truly Bright and Memorable: Jan de Beer's Altarpieces for Renaissance Antwerp

To celebrate the recent conservation of the Barber collection's panel painting of Joseph and the Suitors (front of panel) (above ) and The Nativity (reverse) by Jan de Beer (circa 1475–circa 1527), this exhibition puts the work (thought to be part of depicting the life of the Virgin Mary) centre stage. Complemented by loans from various European collections, the presentation of the Flemish artist's work sheds light on the Antwerp Mannerists
with their expressively posed figures and elaborate architecture.
Barber Institute of Fine Arts
+44 (0)121 414 7333
(barber.org.uk)
From 25 October to
19 January 2019.



BIRMINGHAM

A Tale of Two Empires: Rome and Persia
Late Roman and Sasanian coins from the Barber's collection tell the story of the tumultuous relationship between the Roman and the Persian empires from the 3rd to the 7th centuries AD. Images on the coins and on seals on loan from the Fitzwilliam Museum bear portraits of kings and emperors – such as the silver antoninianus (above) of Valerian I (AD 253–260), – and also tell stories of bloody conflicts, political alliances, artistic exchanges, betrayals and revenge.
Barber Institute of Fine Arts
+44 (0)121 414 7333
(barber.org.uk)
Until 15 March 2020.


BISHOP AUCKLAND
Auckland Castle

For more than 750 years, the
Prince Bishops of Durham governed the North-East of England, with exceptional powers granted by the King of England in 1081, permitting them to raise an army and mint their own coins. Their private palace was Auckland Castle, now opening after an extensive three-year conservation programme. Visitors can now explore St Peter's Chapel, the restored State Rooms, and the Bishops' private apartments, open to the public for the first time, with each room offering a glimpse of a particular bishop at a particular moment in time. Among the works displayed throughout the castle are a 1665 set of elaborate silver and gold altar plates commissioned for Bishop John Cosin's new chapel and the Jacob and His Twelve Sons series of paintings by Francisco de Zurbarán (1598-1664). A dozen of the 13 original paintings were bought by Bishop Trevor in 1756 but, outbid for the last one, he had to resort to commissioning a copy of the 13th.
Auckland Castle
+44 (0)1388 743750
(aucklandproject.org)
From 2 November 2019.

CAMBRIDGE
Goddesses by Marian Maguire

Through a set of five colour lithographs and one etching, New Zealand artist Marian Maguire reconsiders Greek goddesses – Athena, Aphrodite, Artemis, Hera, Demeter and Persephone – from a modern feminist viewpoint. Looking at ancient Greek vase- painting and statuary, Maguire has adapted existing depictions of these goddesses and created new ones in an ancient style, presenting us with restless figures that question their traditional roles and how they may be viewed today.
Museum of Classical Archaeology
+44 (0)1223 330402
(https://www.classics.cam.ac.uk/museum)
Until 13 December 2019.

EDINBURGH
Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing

The wealth of drawings left behind by Leonardo far outnumber his celebrated paintings (of which he completed around 20) and, as many of his projects were unrealised or destroyed, they offer a valuable insight into his wide-ranging work – as a sculptor, architect, military and civil engineer and anatomist. Commemorating the 500th anniversary Leonardo's death, this exhibition – the largest of his work in Scotland – presents 80 of his drawings in the Royal Collection to provide a comprehensive survey of the artist's life and interests. Studies, such as The Head of Leda, circa 1505-8 (above), made for his now-lost painting, Leda and the Swan, cartography, studies of horses and equestrian monuments are all on show.
The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse
+44 (0)303 123 7306
(rct.uk)
From 22 November 2019 to
15 March 2020.

LONDON
Buddhism

During the long history of Buddhism, with its roots in 6th-century BC north India, a rich array of art has been produced for manuscripts, silk scrolls, painted wall hangings, and folding books. Drawing from its strong collection of Asian manuscripts, the British Library's exhibition explores the philosophy and art of Buddhism across its three main schools, Mahayana, Theravada, and Vajrayana, from 20 countries. Through scriptures (written on tree bark, palm leaves and gold), historical narratives, literary works and cosmologies on display, examine the iconography of the Buddha and the role of Buddhism in developing writing and printing techniques to spread information across Asia. It also reflects upon the relevance of the different branches of Buddhism today for its more than 500 million followers across the world. Rich images, such as the gold painting of Amitabha Bodhisattva (Amida Buddha) in a scroll containing the Lotus Sutra (above) 1636, from Japan, illustrate the story.
+44 (0)330 333 1144
(bl.uk)
Until 23 February 2020.

LONDON
Portrait of the artist: Käthe Kollwitz
The UK tour of an exhibition of early 20th-century German artist Käthe Kollwitz's powerful prints comes to an end at the British Museum, where the entire set of seven woodcuts from the Krieg (War) portfolio are exclusively
on display. Kollwitz's emotionally-charged drawings and experimental prints helped her establish herself
in a male-dominated art world and explore compelling subjects like maternal grief (something she knew all too well after the death of her 18-year-old son in 1914), poverty in Berlin, and social and economic protest. Her work focuses on the working class and women, as can be seen in her Krieg (War): The People, 1922, woodcut (above)
This is one of a series that addresses the heart-rending experience of women as mothers, daughters, sweethearts and widows losing their young men.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
Until 12 January 2020.

LONDON
Two Last Nights! Show Business in Georgian Britain
Theatre, opera, and outings to the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens were popular pursuits for Georgians in search of fun, as this exhibition explores. Offering a how-to guide for attending a performance, it looks at audience behaviour and dress-code as well as advertising and ticket sales. Programmes, tickets and caricatures of audiences from the 18th century illustrate how show-business expanded rapidly and leading artists like Hogarth, Hayman, and Lambert became involved in set design a nd scenery painting. One of the highlights, a supper-box painting from Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens depicting the famous actress Kitty Clive, is on public display for the first time in over two centuries.
Foundling Museum
+44 (0)20 7841 3600
(foundlingmuseum.org.uk)
Until 5 January 2020.

LONDON
Human Activity
The latest contemporary installation at the site of the Roman Mithraeum features the work of Daniel Silver,
a London-based artist fascinated by Classical art, archaeology, the history of sculpting and also psychoanalytic theory. His towering 3.5metre tall figures called Human Activity, 2019 (above) have taken over the gallery space, but these monumental sculptures in metallised polystyrene are, in fact, based on diminutive clay objects made in the artist's studio as he observed a dancer's movements, gestures and fleeting postures.
London Mithraeum Bloomberg SPACE
+44 (0)20 7330 7500
(www.londonmithraeum.com)
Until 11 January 2020.

LONDON
Leonardo: Experience a Masterpiece
As part of the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, the National Gallery is presenting an immersive exhibition centred on his painting The Virgin with the Infant Saint John the Baptist adoring the Christ Child accompanied by an Angel (better known as The Virgin of the Rocks (above) Within four spaces, the gallery explores the scientific analysis and conservation of the painting inviting visitors to consider the work in new ways and different contexts: against the backdrop of the idea-rich mind of Leonardo, in the studio, in a room-sized experiment demonstrating the effects of light and shadow, and in an imagined chapel, showing how the painting may have originally appeared as part of an altar-piece.
National Gallery
+44 0800 912 6958
(nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 9 November to
12 January 2020.

LONDON
Divine People: The Art of Ambrose McEvoy
Ambrose McEvoy (1877–1927) may be less well-known today than his friend and contemporary at the Slade School of Fine Art, Augustus John, but during his lifetime, he was a successful society portraitist, painting notable
figures, such as Winston Churchill, Lady Diana Cooper (above) and Prime Minister James Ramsay Macdonald. In the first exhibition devoted to the artist since his death, loans from public institutions and private collections highlight the progressive and experimental nature of his work (for instance, his use of coloured ligh-bulbs to illuminate his sitters) that helped him become popular among the young members of elite society.
Philip Mould & Company
+44 (0)20 7499 6818
(www.philipmould.com)
From 26 November to
24 January 2020.

LONDON
Lucian Freud: The Self-portraits
From his first major self-portrait, Man with a Feather, 1943, to Self-portrait, Reflection, 2002 (below), this exhibition charts the course of Lucian Freud's depictions of himself throughout nearly 70 years of his career. Works on paper as well as paintings, mainly on loan from private collections, draw attention to the playfulness of his early self-portraits, his use of mirrors and the changes to his technique, such as the use of coarse hog's hair brushes and standing, rather than sitting, when working.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
Until 26 January 2020.

LONDON
Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh
More than 150 of the 'wonderful things' found by Howard Carter and his team in the almost intact tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922 are arriving in London as part of an international tour, before they return to be displayed in the new Grand Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Sculpture, a gilded wooden bed and jewellery trace Tutankhamun's journey from death through the underworld to immortality.
Saatchi Gallery
+44 (0)20 7811 3070
(saatchigallery.com)
From 2 November to 3 May 2020.

LONDON
Top Secret: From ciphers to cyber security
To mark the centenary of GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters), the Science Museum presents an exhibition that delivers insights into the secretive workings of the UK's Intelligence, Security, and Cyber agency. More than 100 objects and first-person interviews help tell the stories of people who work to keep us safe, and chart the technological changes over the past century leading to digital security challenges today. Second World War cipher machines, secure telephones, an encryption key used by the Queen, a computer infected with WannaCry ransomware (which notably hit the NHS in 2017) are all on show, while interactive puzzles give visitors the chance to test their deciphering skills.
Science Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 4000
(www.sciencemuseum.ac.uk)
Until 23 February 2020.


LONDON

Inspired by the East: how the Islamic world influenced Western art
Exploring the relationship between 'East' and 'West' in art, this exhibition looks at five centuries of work from the Middle East, North Africa, Europe and North America. In a collaboration between the British Museum and the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia, who have loaned a number of works, the show pays close attention to the tradition of Orientalism, as exemplified by European artists, such as Delacroix, and also shows contemporary responses to Orientalist imagery by female artists from the Middle East and North Africa. Ceramics, photography, manuscripts, clothing, jewellery, glassware and portraits, such as A Portrait of Sultan Bayezid I, circa 1580, School of Veronese (1528–1588, above) are all on show.
British Museum
+44 (0)20 7323 8000
(britishmuseum.org)
From 10 October to 26 January 2020.



LONDON

Gauguin Portraits
Most of the paintings made by French artist Paul Gauguin are self-portraits, such as his Self Portrait with 'The Yellow Christ', 1890-1891 (above), which he produced throughout his career, from its beginning to his final visit to the South Seas, a region which fascinated him. For this, the first exhibition devoted to the artist's portraits, a number of his self-portraits have been brought together along with works depicting his family and friends (including two notable artists Vincent van Gogh and Meijer de Haan, with whom relations were particularly fraught) in paintings, ceramics, sculptures, prints, and drawings. As well as Tahiti, Brittany also played an important role in the artist's early work, although it is the French Polynesian island with which he is most closely associated. The exhibition sets out to explore the current debates surrounding the artist's relationship with the island and the impact of colonialism.
National Gallery
+44 0800 912 6958
(nationalgallery.org.uk)
From 7 October to 26 January 2020.


LONDON

Antony Gormley
This powerful solo show examines the work of the leading contemporary British sculptor Antony Gormley. It includes his work, from the 1970s to the present day, in organic and industrial materials, and also his ambitious installations which prompt visitors to consider the body, its own space, and its relationship to the space around it. Early, rarely exhibited works highlight his experimental beginnings, distinctive 'body case' sculptures, concrete creations, works on paper using crude oil, earth, and blood, and workbooks that chart the artist's pursuit of ideas will all be on show. Large scale works, which encourage visitors to engage with their own bodies and navigate the space, include: Lost Horizon I, 2008 (above), which positions 24 cast iron figures on the floor, on the walls and on the ceiling, forcing the viewer to challenge their perceptions; Clearing VII, 2019, which is made of kilometres of coiled aluminium tubing; and Host, 2019, in which a gallery is flooded with seawater and clay; this is the first UK presentation of this elemental work, which has only been exhibited three times since its initial conception in 1997.
Royal Academy of Arts
+44 (0)20 7300 8090
(royalacademy.org.uk)
From 21 September to 3 December.


LONDON

Top Secret: From ciphers to cyber security
To mark the centenary of GCHQ, the Science Museum presents an exhibition that delivers insights into the secretive workings of the UK's Intelligence, Security, and Cyber agency. More than 100 objects and first-person interviews help tell the stories of people who keep us safe and chart the technological changes over the past centuries, leading to digital security challenges today. Second World War cipher machines, secure telephones, an encryption key used by the Queen, and a computer infected with WannaCry ransomware (which hit the NHS in 2017) are among the exhibits, while interactive puzzles give visitors the chance to test out their skills. Elsewhere in the Science Museum, the new gallery Science City 1550-1800 is opening on 12 September. Centring on London's role as a world city, a hub of trade, exploration and scientific endeavour, it brings together instruments such globes and microscopes, including one designed by Robert Hooke (above), explores how evidence was examined, and considers the relationship between science and the monarchy.
Science Museum
+44 (0)20 7942 4000
(www.sciencemuseum.ac.uk)
Until 23 February 2020.


MILTON KEYNES
George Stubbs: 'all done from Nature'

A self-taught painter, printmaker, and draughtsman, the 18th-century artist George Stubbs was also a fine anatomist, engaging in an intense 18-month period of dissection and classification, during which he produced a finished study for 'The Fourth Anatomical Table of the Muscles... of the Horse', 1756-1758 (above). Stubbs is known for his accurate, masterful studies of horses, exemplified in Whistlejacket, 1762, his most famous work, but he also studied human anatomy and had a keen interest in newly discovered animals across the globe, as seen in the range of paintings, prints and drawings on display here.
MK Gallery
+44(0)1908 676900
www.mkgallery.org
From 12 October to 26 January 2020.

NORWICH
Magdalene Odundo: The Journey of Things

For her burnished ceramics, Magdalene Odundo has drawn inspiration from traditions across the world, stretching back some 3,000 years. In the artist's quest to learn more about ceramic arts and crafts, she has travelled widely, to Africa – Kenya, Uganda and Nigeria – to Asia, to Central America, and to Europe. These journeys have made their mark on Odundo's own visual language and her resulting large, often asymmetrical, vessels, with their striking silhouettes that evoke human forms and vivid orange or smooth black finishes. Pieces by Odundo are show with objects chosen for their role in the development of her work. One highlight is Transition II, the artist's largest work, which consists of 1001 suspended pieces of glass and is redesigned for each new venue in which it is exhibited.
Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
+44 (0)1603 593199
(scava.ac.uk)
Until 15 December 2019.

OXFORD
Last Supper in Pompeii

Roman banquets were famously decadent – held in decorated rooms where diners reclined on couches eating delicacies, such as stuffed dormice, and enjoying freely flowing wine. This rich exhibition explores every aspect of Roman gastronomy using many loans from southern Italy: stunning mosaics (above), sculptures, frescoes, and food. The show examines how Roman dining habits evolved, how they produced, distributed, and consumed food and wine, and how dining even played a part
in funerary customs.
Ashmolean Museum
+44 (0)1865 278000
(www.ashmolean.org)
Until 12 January 2020.

OXFORD
Significant historical maps, maps of imaginary worlds, and maps by contemporary artists, Grayson Perry and Layla Curtis, have been brought together in a celebration of cartographic creation, which includes fine examples from the Bodleian's own outstanding collection of more than 1.5 million maps. This exhibition explores the ways that maps – made out of many different media including tapestry and sticks of wood – can be used, whether to administer cities, deceive attackers, draw national boundaries, or show the way to religious salvation. Highlights include: the late 14th-century Gough Map, the earliest surviving map of a recognisable Great Britain; a Tibetan Buddhist thangka (above) showing the Wheel of Life with the worlds of gods, demons and men, all held in the claws of all-devouring Time; and al-Idrīsī's beautiful world map, of 1154, which makes use of Islamic cosmology and geography.
Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until 8 March 2020.

OXFORD
Thinking 3D: From Leonardo to the Present

The challenge of capturing the three-dimensional on the two-dimensional surface of a page is one that has faced both artists and scientists. This is one of many shows that are being held to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, and it looks at how people have approached this challenge over the past five centuries. Drawings by Leonardo are on show, as well as the first printed illustration of a many-sided icosidodecahedron from the Divina Proportione, 1509, the only book that he illustrated. The exhibition charts how new technologies, such as the printing press, photography, stereoscopy and 3-D modelling, have helped develop ideas in anatomy, architecture, astronomy and geometry. Other highlights include anatomical books with flaps and pop-up elements, Galileo's illustrations on the moon based on his observations through a telescope in 1609, and the first geological map of Mars, made using data from NASA's 1971–72 Mariner 9 mission.
Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries
+44 (0)1865 277094
(www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk)
Until February 2020.

UNITED STATES
BOSTON, Massachusetts
Ancient Nubia Now

The region of Nubia in southern Egypt and northern Sudan, known as Kush in antiquity, was home to a series of powerful kingdoms with far-reaching trade networks between 2500 BC and AD 300. This exhibition draws on MFA's strong holdings of Nubian art (the largest collection outside Sudan) to give a rich introduction to the region, its different kingdoms a nd rulers, their capitals Kerma (2400–1550 BC), Napata (800 –300 BC), and Meroe (300 BC–AD 300) and their exquisite artworks. The more than 400 artefacts on display were mostly found during the early 20th-century excavations made by the Harvard University–Boston Museum of Fine Arts' Expedition. Stunning jewels worn by Nubian queens, kingly funerary figurines, statuary from the sacred mountain of King Aspelta, and inscriptions in the still-untranslated Meroitic script all feature, along with fine wares imported from the Mediterranean and from Egypt that highlight Nubia's role in trade.
Museum of Fine Arts
+1 617-267-9300
(mfa.org)
Until 20 January 2020.


CLEVELAND, OHIO
Michelangelo: Mind of the Master

A genius among the draughtsmen of the Renaissance, Michelangelo employed drawing as a vital part of his creative process and used it to particularly great effect in his expression of the human form. The artist burned large quantities of his drawings, but luckily a number still survive. Since 1791, the Teylers Museum in Haarlem has held a collection of these drawings, which came from the collection of Queen Christina of Sweden (1626-1689), who abdicated the throne and moved to Rome. Exquisite drawings, some in red chalk, such as Seated male nude; separate study of his right arm, 1511, (above) loaned from this collection, form the centrepiece of the show, which has been organised by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the J Paul Getty Museum (where it will be from 25 February–7 June 2020) in conjunction with the Teylers Museum. The drawings on display reflect Michelangelo's range as a painter, sculptor, and architect, and include designs for some of his most famous projects, such as the Sistine Chapel, the cupola of Saint Peter's Basilica and the Medici Chapel tombs.
Cleveland Museum of Art
+1 216-421-7350
(www.clevelandart.org)
From 22 September to 5 January 2020.

NEW YORK, New York
The Last Knight: The Art, Armor and Ambition of Maximilian I
In commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the death of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I (1459–1519), this major exhibition examines the part armour played in his life and in promoting his image. Through outstanding examples of European armour, paintings, sculptures, tapestries, stained glass, toys and more, visitors will learn about the importance of armour at the dawn of the Renaissance, the leader's great dynastic plans, and the role of chivalry. One highlight is the recently conserved complete series of 18 sandstone reliefs , which were commissioned by Maximilian for his residence in Innsbruck and which are leaving their home city for the first time.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212-535-7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
Until 5 January 2020.

NEW YORK, New York
Pierre Cardin: Future Fashion

Fashion designer Pierre Cardin (now 97 years old) is well known for the bold, futuristic, Space Age clothing that he created during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, but as this expansive retrospective – drawn primarily from the couturier's archive – sets out to show, his work extends far beyond fashion into furniture, industrial design, and more. Among the highlights are garments from the 1964 Cosmocorps collection, pieces in the self-named Cardine synthetic fabric, and distinctive unisex full-knit bodysuits layered with skirts, vests and bibs.
Brooklyn Museum
+1 718-638-5000
(brooklynmuseum.org)
Until 5 January 2020.

NEW YORK, New York
The Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximilian I
In commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the death of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I (1459-1519), this major exhibition examines the part that armour played in his life and ambitions. Through outstanding examples of European armour, paintings, sculptures, tapestries, stained glass, toys, and more, visitors will learn about the importance of armour at the dawn of the Renaissance, the leader's great dynastic plans, and the role of chivalry. One highlight is the recently conserved complete series of 18 sandstone reliefs commissioned by Maximilian for his residence in Innsbruck, which are leaving their home city for the first time.
Metropolitan Museum of Art
+1 212-535-7710
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 7 October to 5 January 2019.

NEW YORK, New York
The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy
Discovered within the walls of a house in Colmar, northeastern France, in 1863, a small set of exquisite jewellery belonging to a single family tells the story of their changing fortunes in the tumultuous 14th century. The Colmar Treasure (on loan from Musée de Cluny in Paris) consists of more than 300 coins, gilded buttons, brooches, an enamelled belt, fine rings with sapphire, ruby, garnet, turquoise and onyx, and a Jewish ceremonial wedding ring (above). As the richness of these items attest, Colmar's Jewish community once thrived but, when the plague devastated the area in 1348-49, it was scapegoated and they were put to death. Related works from other collections look at the role of Jewish communities in medieval Europe.
The Met Cloisters
+1 212 923 3700
(www.metmuseum.org)
From 22 July 2019 to 12 January 2020.

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania
Mexico and Central America Gallery

The cultural achievements and diversity of societies across Mexico and Central America are celebrated in Penn Museum's reimagined gallery devoted to this region. As well as the differences between the ancient cultures of the area, the gallery also considers their similarities with regards to sport, shared ideas about divinity and political authority. Among the 260 artefacts displayed are Maya stelae, gold objects from Panama and Costa Rica, Aztec sculptures, and the Great Goddess of Teotihuacan. While there is much to learn about fascinating ancient cities, visitors will also find out about the modern region and the traditions of Maya people today. The reopening of the gallery also sees the continuation of the Museum's Global Guides programme, with refugees and immigrants from Mexico and Central America giving insightful tours based on their own intimate knowledge of the region.
Penn Museum
+1 215-898-4000
(penn.museum)
From 16 November.

SAN FRANCISCO, California
Lisa Reihana: in Pursuit of Venus [infected]

New Zealand artist Lisa Reihana's extraordinary, nearly 25m-long panoramic video work in Pursuit of Venus [infected], 2015–17 (detail, above) has just been acquired as part of the de Young museum's contemporary art programme. Reihana's digital scroll challenges the romanticised view of European explorations in Polynesia as presented in Joseph Dufour's early 19th-century French scenic wallpaper Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique (Native Peoples of the South Pacific). Instead, she offers a more complex approach to cultural identity and colonialism. For this, the first display of the work in the continental United States, Les Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique wallpaper and an 18th-century folio with scenes of Captain Cook's exploits in the Pacific Ocean will also be on view.
de Young museum
+1 415-750-3600
(deyoungmuseum.org)
From 10 August 2019 to 5 January 2020.

SIMI VALLEY, California
Egypt's Lost Cities

Marvellous finds from the drowned Ancient Egyptian cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus are on tour across the USA. More than 250 remarkably well-preserved objects, recovered from beneath the waves of Aboukir Bay by Frank Goddio and his team, offer an extraordinary insight into these two once thriving port-cities on the Egyptian Delta, lost to the sea. The exhibition uses exquisite metalwork, gold jewellery and vast statues, such as the stately black stone queen, who is possibly Cleopatra III (left) and stelae, to shed light on the lost cities, their religion and power.
Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Institute
+1 805-522-2977
(www.reaganfoundation.org)
Until 12 April 2020.


WASHINGTON DC
Sacred Dedication: A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece

A splendid gilded wooden sculpture, on loan from the National Museum of Korea, puts the spotlight on image consecration. Carved during the late Goryeo period (AD 918 –1392), Gwaneum (above) is the Bodhisattva of compassion – the most popular deity in Korean Buddhism. It was first installed in its place of worship during the 13th century with a consecration ceremony during which dedicatory materials – sacred texts, symbolic seeds and jewels – were sealed inside the hollow sculpture to transform it into a living body. Recent analysis by the National Museum of Korea has found that it is the oldest surviving gilded wood sculpture in an informal pose from Korea, and gives information about its hidden contents and the rituals of image consecration.
Freer|Sackler
+1 202 633 1000
(freersackler.si.edu)
Until 22 March 2020.

WASHINGTON DC
Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain
While he was a young man, the Spanish Renaissance artist Alonso Berruguete (circa 1488–1561) spent at least a decade in Italy This had a great influence on the dramatic and expressive sculpture he later created when he returned to Spain. For this, the first exhibition devoted to the artist outside his homeland, Berruguete's best-known works, his painted and gilded sculptures, take centre stage, but close attention is also paid to his skill as a draftsman and a painter, seen, for example, in Salome, (above), which he painted in Italy circa 1514–1517.
National Gallery of Art
+1 202 737-4215
(nga.gov)
Until 17 February 2020.


WASHINGTON DC
Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence

Andrea del Verrocchio was a versatile and innovative painter and sculptor in Renaissance Florence who counted among his pupils Leonardo, Pietro Perugino, and likely Sandro Botticelli. He had a tremendous influence on the development of later Italian art and was able to deftly handle a variety of media – oil paint, bronze, clay, metalpoint, chalk, and pen and ink. Featuring the latest technical research into the artist's materials and techniques, this exhibition explores an impressive array of Verrocchio's masterful paintings, drawings and sculpture, such as Alexander the Great, circa 1480–85, in Carrara marble (above ).
to highlight his versatility.
National Gallery of Art
+1 202-842-6511
(www.nga.gov)
From 15 September to
12 January 2020.

CANADA


MONTREAL
Egyptian Mummies: Exploring Ancient Lives

Developments in X-rays, CT (computerised tomography) scanning, and high-resolution 3D-imaging techniques have allowed researchers to study delicate ancient Egyptian mummies in non-invasive ways without removing any of their wrappings. At the British Museum, these analyses have revealed details of the lives and deaths of six people who lived along the Nile between 900 BC and 180 AD, shedding light on their age, beliefs, and diseases. These six mummies, including a Roman mummy of a child in a gilded case (above) dating from circa AD 40–60, and their stories are explored in this touring exhibition, which is making its North American premiere in Montreal.
Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
+1 514-285-2000
(mbam.qc.ca)
Until 2 February 2020.

DENMARK
COPENHAGEN
The Road to Palmyra

At the Efqa Spring in the midst of the Syrian Desert, the ancient city of Palmyra was once a thriving community. Now, sadly, it is more widely known because of the appalling destruction of is buildings and artefacts by
Daesh. An oasis city, halfway between the Euphrates and the Mediterranean, it was once a multicultural centre, a place for exchange and trade on the eastern fringes of the Roman Empire. The ancient city's most famous artefacts are its sculpted tomb portraits, such as one of a grand lady decked out in jewellery known as The Beauty of Palmyra. More than 100 of the Palmyrene funerary portraits from the Glyptotek are on show with other artefacts from the Roman Empire, 19th-century photographs, and paintings of the site, providing a wide-ranging view of this alluring city's history.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptoteket
+45 33 41 81 41
(glyptoteket.com)
Until 1 March 2020.

FRANCE
LENS
Poland: Painting the Soul of a Nation

On 3 September 1919, France and Poland signed an agreement 'relating to emigration and immigration', which led to the arrival of large numbers of Polish workers in France, particularly in the mining region in the north. To celebrate this centenary, the Musée du Louvre -Lens in northern France, the National Museum of Warsaw and the Adam Mickiewicz Institute, are presenting a show of 19th-century Polish art, with many paintings on loan from Polish National Museum. Most of the works date from 1840 to 1918, when Poland was divided between the Russian empire, the Austrian empire and the kingdom of Prussia. Artists like Jan Matejko, Jacek Malczewski, Józef Brandt, Józef Chełmoński, Olga Boznańska present a vision of Polish identity, drawing on the country's history, landscape and rural living.
Louvre Lens
+33 3 21 18 62 62
(louvrelens.fr)
Until 20 January 2020.

PARIS
Leonardo da Vinci

It was in France that Leonardo da Vinci died 500 years ago and to mark this anniversary, the Louvre has brought together paintings, drawings, manuscripts, sculptures, and objets d'art for a major retrospective of the artist's career. Special attention is paid to Leonardo's paintings in the Louvre's own collection, as the exhibition sets out to show how important he considered painting to be and, with recent scientific examinations and conservation treatment of Saint Anne, Saint John the Baptist and La Belle Ferronnière (Portrait d'une dame de la cour de Milan) (above) give us a clearer view
of his technique.
Louvre
+33 (0)1 40 20 53 17
(louvre.fr)
Until 24 February 2020.

PARIS
The Alana Collection: Masterpieces of Italian Painting
Works such as Lippi's Saint Ubald et saint Frediano, 1496 (above) are in the Alana Collection, which was built up by Alvaro Saieh and Ana Guzmán and is currently housed in the USA. It has never been publicly exhibited, but it holds an impressive set of Italian works, from 13th-century paintings to Caravaggesque compositions. Paintings, sculptures, and objets d'art – including works by Fra Angelico, Lippi, Bellini, Tintoretto, Veronese, and Orazio Gentileschi – are on loan to the Musée Jacquemart-André, where they provide an ample overview of the riches of the private collection.
Musée Jacquemart-André
+33 1 45 62 11 59
(www.musee-jacquemart-andre.com)
From 13 September to
20 January 2020.

GERMANY
BERLIN
Berlin's Largest Excavation. Research Area Biesdorf

Between 1999 and 2014, archaeologists excavated 22 hectares of land in Biesdorf, Berlin and uncovered evidence of 10,000 years of settlement in the district along the small river Wuhle, including 84 wells and a prehistoric deer mask (see other examples n pages 42 to 47). This exhibition presents some of their finds while delving into the ways archaeologists carry out their investigations. There will even be the chance to watch live excavations carried out by students from the Free University Berlin working on blocks of earth recovered from the site during fieldwork.
Neues Museum
+49 30 266 42 42 42
(www.smb.museum/en/museums-institutions/neues-museum/home.html)
Until 19 April 2020.


BERLIN
Strong Figures: Greek Portraits from Antiquity

Greek portraits of specific, real individuals have had a profound impact on Western art history, influencing traditions of portraiture today. These ancient portraits did not have to be true to life, and they often carried inscriptions identifying their subjects, who appear according to cultural types, with their age, status and affiliation. Marble portrait busts of poets, philosophers, kings and queens, such as Portrait of Queen Berenice II of Egypt who reigned in 246-221 BC (above), and figures of state are on view with reliefs, vases paintings (including a unique Attic painting of the poet Sappho), and other artefacts, which cast light on the tension between socials ideals and the portrayal of real figures.
Altes Museum
+49 30 266424242
(www.smb.museum)
Until 2 February 2020.


WEIMAR
The Bauhaus comes from Weimar

As the art world celebrates 100 years of the Bauhaus, a new museum devoted to Walter Gropius' influential art and design school opens its doors in its home-town of Weimar. This permanent exhibition draws on a collection of Bauhaus works begun by Gropius in the 1920s with pieces selected from 13,000 objects that trace the development of the school and invite the visitor to consider the question Gropius put: 'How do we want to live together?' Works include a slatted chair by Marcel Breuer, furniture by Mies van der Rohe, and Dragonjar (above) by the ceramicist Wilhelm Löber's (1903–81).
Bauhaus Museum Weimar
+49 3643 545400
(www.klassik-stiftung.de/bauhaus-museum-weimar/)
Ongoing.

ITALY
MILAN
Spitzmaus Mummy in a Coffin and other Treasures

The brilliant Texan filmmaker Wes Anderson (whose films include The Royal Tenenbaums, Moonrise Kingdom and Grand Hotel Budapest) has teamed up with the writer and illustrator Juman Malouf and, together, they have chosen more than 500 diverse objects from the collections of the Kunsthistorisches Museum and Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna. They include artefacts from ancient Egypt, such as the 4th-century BC shrew (spitzmaus) mummy (that lends its name to the exhibition), Greece, and Rome, Old Master paintings, coins, musical instruments, armour, natural history specimens, and more. The exhibition has been expanded with additional objects for its run at the Fondazione Prada, and considers the many aspects of a collection, the reasons for its creation and how its objects are housed, presented and experienced.
Fondazione Prada
+39 02 5666 2611
(fondazioneprada.org)
Until 13 January 2020.


SYRACUSE
Archimedes in Syracuse

One of the most celebrated scientists of the ancient world, Archimedes lived and worked in Syracuse (the capital of Magna Graecia) on Sicily. He was killed during the Second Punic War (for which he designed and built war- machines) when Roman forces captured the city after a siege. This exhibition immerses the visitor in the 3rd-century BC Syracuse, with reconstructions of the Euryalus fortress, the theatre, and the temple of Athena, and showcases working models of the devices attributed to Archimedes, such as a hydraulic screw, burning mirrors, a water clock, a steam cannon, and a mechanical planetarium that was taken to Rome as booty after the
fall of the city. But although the subject is ancient, the design of the exhibition (above) gives it a contemporary feel.
Galleria Civica Montevergini
+39 093124902
(www.mostraarchimede.it)
Until 31 December 2019.

NETHERLANDS


AMSTERDAM
Rembrandt-Velázquez. Dutch and Spanish Masters

The year 2019 sees two big anniversaries in Dutch and Spanish art: it is the 350th anniversary of the death of Rembrandt and the 200th anniversary of the Prado Museum in Madrid. To mark both of these milestones, the Rijksmuseum and the Prado have come together for a celebration of the magnificent paintings produced by Dutch and Spanish masters during the 17th-century, a period dubbed the Golden Age for painting in both
the Netherlands and Spain. With Spanish and Dutch works hung together in pairs according to themes, the exhibition invites the viewer to consider the similarities between the paintings from each country, as well as the differences. Works by Rembrandt, Velázquez, Murillo, Hals, Vermeer and Zurbarán, whose Agnus Dei, 1635–1640 (above) is in the show. Their works demonstrate how the artists approached realism, religion, wealth, composition, and light and shadow.
Rijksmuseum
+31 20 674 7000
(rijksmuseum.nl)
Until 19 January 2020.


AMSTERDAM
Jewels! Glittering at the Russian Court

For the second jubilee exhibition celebrating 10 years of the Hermitage's Amsterdam outpost, a dazzling array
of jewels have left St Petersburg. These include stunning work by Cartier, Lalique, Tiffany and Fabergé and a fabulous late 18th–early 19th-century gold and silver watch, decorated with enamel, glass, pearls, by Léonard Bordier (below left). There are also portraits of Catherine the Great and other royal family members, ball-gowns, and imperial costumes that reflect the glittering world of Russian high society over two centuries.
Hermitage Amsterdam
+31 20 530 8755
(hermitage.nl)
From 14 September to
15 March 2020.

DEN BOSCH
Van Gogh's Inner Circle: Family, Friends and Models

Van Gogh's relationships – at times turbulent and fraught – are a subject of great interest to many. This exhibition, which includes his private letters and documents, as well as paintings, drawings and sketchbooks, delves into the artist's family relations, love-affairs, and friendships with artists like Paul Gauguin, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Paul Signac, and Emile Bernard. Special attention is given to Van Gogh's bond with his brother Theo, and the exhibits include, touchingly, condolence letters sent to Theo by Camille Pissarro, Toulouse-Lautrec and Gauguin, as well as intimate still lifes and portraits, such as Still life with Bible, 1885, and Madame Roulin Rocking the Cradle (La Berceuse) 1889 (above).
Het Noordbrabants Museum
+31 73 687 7877
(www.hetnoordbrabantsmuseum.nl)
From 21 September to
12 January 2020.

DELFT
Pieter de Hooch in Deft: From the shadow of Vermeer

Working in the 17th-century, the Dutch painter Pieter de Hooch is often rather overshadowed by his contemporary Vermeer. This exhibition, the first retrospective in the Netherlands devoted to de Hooch centres on the paintings featuring splendid interiors and courtyards he produced in Delft between circa 1652 and 1660, Many on loan from leading European and American collections. They include The Mother, 1661–1663 (above).
Museum Prinsenhof Delft
+31 15 260 2358
(www.prinsenhof-delft.nl)
From 11 October to
16 February 2020.

LEIDEN
Cyprus: A Dynamic Island

The history of the island of Cyprus stretches back more than 12,000 years. Its location means that it has been a hotbed for cultural exchange and trade between countries of the eastern and western Mediterranean. Bearing witness to Cyprus' rich history and diverse influences are a fabulous array of artefacts, 300 of which are on loan from the national collections of Cyprus. They include: gold jewellery, imported from Phoenicia, exquisitely decorated pottery, a royal throne inlaid with silver, and terracotta portraits, such as one of a woman, dating from 625–600 BC (below). Rijksmuseum van Oudheden
+31 71 516 3163
(rmo.nl)
Until 15 March 2020.

EVENTS

UNITED KINGDOM
LONDON
Asian Art in London
Leading international dealers, auction houses, and prominent museums and institutions celebrate the riches of Asian art during this annual event, with a programme which features exhibitions, auctions, lectures, and receptions.
31 October–9 November 2019
Multiple venues
(www.asianartinlondon.com)

Gresham College Lectures
Charles I: The Court at War

Simon Thurley
Museum of London
6 November, 6pm

Powell and Pressburger: The Matter of Britain
Ian Christie
Institut Francais London,
11 November, 6pm
Kim Hunter and David Niven (above) starred in Powell and Pressburger's A Matter of Life
and Death, 1946.
(To book go to www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/matter-of-britain)

How the English Learned to Hate Catholics
Alec Ryrie
Museum of London
20 November, 6pm

A History of the Eye
Joanna Bourke
Barnard's Inn Hall,
21 November, 6pm

Physics: Its Birth in Greek Ionia
Edith Hall
Barnard's Inn Hall,
28 November, 1pm

The Role of Kew and Colonial Botanic Gardens
Jim Endersby
Barnard's Inn Hall,
2 December, 6pm
Most of these hour-long lectures are free, on a first-come, first-served basis, a few require tickets – bookable on the website. These talks can also be watched online.
(www.gresham.ac.uk/attend)

Leonardo: The Virgin of the Rocks
In a three-week course, art historian Katy Blatt will conduct a close study of Leonardo's two versions of The Virgin of Rocks. She will place the works in the context of the artist's life, examining how the commission for the painting can shed light on Leonardo's scientific, philosophical, and psychological transformations.
National Gallery
Friday 15, 22, 29 November 2019
(www.nationalgallery.org.uk/events/courses)

Rothschild Foundation Lecture Series
For the Royal Academy's second annual lecture (supported by the Rothschild Foundation), the artist Marina Abramović will talk about her 50-year-old career, the body as material, her relationship with the public, and her vision for the future. After her talk, Abramović will be joined by Tim Marlow, Artistic Director at the RA, for a Q&A.
Royal Academy of Arts
18 November, 7pm
(www.royalacademy.org.uk)

London Art Week (winter)
Held at multiple locations in St James's and Mayfair, the winter edition of this art fair promise to be a glittering occasion. Antiquities, Old Masters, modern, contemporary and decorative art will be on show and for sale at three auction houses and the galleries of 50 international dealers, including Colnaghi, Sam Fogg, Ariadne, and Forge & Lynch Ltd who are offering a stunning Iznik tile, 1570–80 (above) with a unique provenance. It was once in the collection of Ambroise Baudry (1838-1906), architect to Isma'il Pasha, the Khedive of Egypt and Sudan from 1863–79.
Multiple venues
1–6 December 2019
(www.londonartweek.co.uk

VARIOUS LOCATIONS
Andante Study Days
The Secret World of Spies in London
Boris Volodarsky, 8 November

Henry VIII
Suzannah Lipscomb
Hampton Court Palace
15 November

Life and Death in Middle Egypt
Joyce Tyldesley
University of Manchester
21 November
(www.andantetravels.co.uk)

FRANCE
PARIS
Fine Arts Paris

Now in its third edition, Fine Arts Paris offers a range of exhibitors, including 10 new galleries, showing Old Masters, modern paintings, tapestries and antiquities. This
year's guest museum is La Piscine–Musée d'Art et d'Industrie André Diligent de Roubaix, which will present a exhibition of its choice objects. There will also be behind-the-scenes tours of other museums and, on 14 November, a new work will be created by Italian street artist Andrea Ravo Mattoni.
13-17 November
Carrousel de Louvre
(www.finearts-paris.com)

 







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